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04/20/2014 @ 03:54 PM
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Tri-state Rodbuilders Workshop 3/29 near Dubuque, IA

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Tri-state Rodbuilders workshop in Peosta March 29, 9-4!

Held at the Swiss Valley Nature Center – 13606 Swiss Valley Rd – Peosta, IA 52068.
https://maps.google.com/maps?q=Swiss+Valley+Nature+Center+++++13606+Swiss+Valley+Road&ie=UTF-8&ei=Ci8RU_qhGOPhyQH42oCoDg&ved=0CAkQ_AUoAQ

Join the fun as the traveling fishing rod building event returns to its roots near Dubuque. If you have been to the workshop at Wickiup Hill you realize what a great learning experience these events can be for those interested in building custom rods. We should have a good line up and should cover quite a few topics. Ed Karwacki will be presenting a demonstration on dying wood handles, Al Engling will be doing a presentation on Butt Cap Inserts, Mark Blabaum will be presenting inlaying objects into grips with casting resin. Andy Wolfram will be presenting skinning foam cores with carbon fiber. I may have one more presenter on Morton Guide Placement, but haven’t verified that. Scott Kleppe will have American Tackle prizes and Microwave Guide set ups for several complete kits to give away. The presentations will benefit builders of all skill levels from beginners to professionals.

Please send an RSVP to Mark Blabaum @ Hellsangler@live.com or let us know here on the Tri-State Rod Builders Facebook page if you will be attending, to plan ahead for food or to contact us for more information. The workshop is free – goodwill donations accepted for lunch. Bill Pulk from Midwest Rod and Reel will be there to sell components, also if you would like to place an order with Bill, he’s offering a 10% discount and will bring the components to the gathering saving you shipping. You can contact Bill at Bill@midwestrodandreel.com or you can call him at 612-720-5268. Bill’s web site is http://www.midwestrodandreel.com/ .

I’d like to also offer a table or two for attendees to bring some of your unused or unwanted components to swap or sell, I’d like to run that through the lunch hour. I’m providing lunch and will be accepting a goodwill donation for the food. There is no admission and the day is free to any that would like to attend, please RSVP to let me know how much food to bring.

I’m planning on opening the doors at 9:00 am for a meet and greet and will start off the presenters at 9:30.

Swiss Valley Nature Center 13606 Swiss Valley Road - Google Maps

maps.google.com




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Fall Walleye Fishing

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Fall Walleye Fishing, Fall Fishing
Article by guest poster: Cody Brown

While hunting and steelhead fishing takes the prime interest of many outdoorsmen in the fall, for me fall is walleye time. As any die hard angler will tell you fall is definitely a time to get out on the water. All species of fish are on overdrive when it comes to feeding this time of year. The reason being is that fish are building up their fat reserves for winter, this is no different with the elusive Walleye. With this happening those who are willing to brave the weather and sacrifice some sleep have a great opportunity at some Walleye.

I like to get out just before sun down to as late as 2 or 3am and possibly even sunup if I’m feeling adventurous. Just being out on the water will not fill the live well, Walleye are very structure oriented fish so your first task should be to locate any possible fish holding structure. This can be rip rap shorelines, sunken islands, drop offs, and many other types of structure. My preference in the fall usually focuses on rocky areas and especially rocky windblown points. The reason being, that this is the only consistent type of hiding structure readily available this time of year for bait fish and other food sources. By this time of year weeds that would have served as a home for these food sources earlier have now died off pushing them into the rocks.

Now that we have found our structure we must now select a bait or lure to use. As most Walleye fisherman will tell say it is hard to beat a jig. I am a big believer in Northland Fishing Tackle Jigs and use them religiously. I usually use the Northland Fireball jig with a bigger profile artificial such as a 4″ Gulp minnow. With a jig I use a snap jigging approach which consists of simply popping the jig forward on a retrieve or troll. If your not that into jig fishing you can also try shad style Crankbaits or Stickbaits. Just remember natural looking baits for clear water and bright baits for dirtier water. With shad style baits its hard to beat a traditional shad rap size 5 or 7 and a Salmo Hornet. These two lures alone have contributed to many tournament wins in national walleye circuits. For stickbaits I prefer Storm Lures Thunderstick Jr’s, #9/#11 Rapala Minnows, and #12 Rapala Husky Jerks. These baits work good for me year round. Whether you choose a shad style Crankbait or a Stickbait both lures work great casted or trolled. If trolling shoot for a speed anywhere from 1.5-3 mph. You may find that on certain days you may need to go faster or slower than these speeds. Also at night you might want to consider using planer boards to reduce scaring fish if fishing shallow. If casting switch up retrieves until you get something to work. Anything from a simple retrieve to a stop and go retrieve can work.

These are by no means the only ways to catch Walleye this time of year and anglers should experiment as much as possible. However you decide to go about fall Walleye fishing always remember the guy out fishing always catches more than the guy sitting at home!


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Winter Urban Trout Stock - Lake Petocka

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What: The Iowa DNR will be stocking the lake with 1,500 trout
When: January, 25th
Time: Stocking will be between 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
Where: Lake Petocka

Lunch will be served to the first 225! First come first serve.

Bring the family out for fish, food, and fun!!!


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A Hunt For The Ages!

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Posted for Larry Richards:

Jan 13 2012 I received and email from Bonnet Plume outfitters where I had hunted sheep. "Your wonderful wife has asked me to arrange a moose hunt for you, how does Sept 2013 sound” Think I turned her down? I am at the stage of my life where I do not wish any of the time left away, but I admit to looking forward a lot for the next 20 months as I gathered "stuff" for my next adventure. A heavier sleeping bag, some new boots, a new load for my gun, and a few other necessities were gradually accumulated. A second spot was open, and I twisted Dr. Stanley's arm until he decided to go as well. I think Connie wanted me to stay in "sheep shape", and I managed to stay close.

Sept 18 found us flying by way of Denver, and Vancouver to Whitehorse Yukon. No glitches at security, TSA, or customs were found, and all our gear arrived as well. We were scheduled to fly into base camp on the 20th, so I set out on the 19th to show Bill the sights I knew. As we returned at noon for lunch, we found that we were being sought, and the rest of our group was waiting at the airport for an early flight in to escape weather which threatened to stop flying for several days. A leisurely, night long, packing turned into a frantic rush, as we were ready to fly within 30 minutes. I love these charter bush flights, right above and even between the mountains until we landed on the gravel strip, to be greeted by our hosts and the last group of hunters flying out. We were cautioned not to be dismayed if we did not equal the 71-inch specimen that one had gotten, in that it would approach world record numbers. Some gun sighting, form signing, and companion greeting over we began to head for our respective spike camps. Some by horse, some by plane, some by ATV and me by boat.




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New Hunt Test Venue On The Move

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

New Hunt Test Venue On the Move: Focusing on Education and Newcomers

Lindenhurst, IL – (November 4, 2013) – The Upland Gundog Association (UGA) is an organization that many in the hunting dog and bird hunting communities had never heard of two years ago when they began in 2011. Now, as 2013 is wrapping up, this organization has managed to appeal to bird dog owners, trainers and enthusiasts around the United States and even Canada. With over a dozen hunt test events, and 200 plus individual dogs participating in their venue, the UGA has caught the attention of many hunting dog enthusiasts.

“We are very unique”, said Ryan Eder, UGA President. “Not only is our venue more focused on the common bird hunter, but we are dedicated to educating people about dog training, and ultimately getting more hunters and dog owners in the field with their dogs. UGA hunt tests offer a test format for anyone, from youth or inexperienced handlers (men and women alike), to hunters, hunt testers and even professional gundog trainers”.

The UGA was founded originally as the Upland Retriever Association, with the goal of offering an upland hunt test for retrievers (not many existed at the time). “We recognized a lack of upland hunt test venues for retrievers”, said Ryan Eder, “but as our idea evolved, we wanted to apply our goals to all sporting breeds and offer a hunt test for hunters, by hunters. The same people that wrote the rule book are the same two people that judge the tests, eliminating a lot of political issues that many other hunt test organizations face today”.

UGA hunt test titles are not recognized on pedigrees, but the organization is not so sure they are concerned about that. When asked about getting UGA titles on AKC or UKC pedigrees, Ryan responded, “There are other hunt test venues whose titles will show up on a dog’s pedigree and we fully support those organizations. We even run our own dogs in them! UGA hunt tests are no walk in the park, and if a dog successfully completes one of our Gundog or Advanced level tests it absolutely proves that they are an exceptional bird dog. That is good enough for us”.

UGA is also concerned with providing an affordable venue for bird dog owners to participate in. Most hunt test venues charge between $45 and $65 per entry. To earn your title, most organizations require at least four “passes” (completing the test successfully according to the judge) which could total well over $200 for your title. Here’s the kicker; four passes would require attending at least two events, as they often only offer one test per day on a weekend. In addition to the entry fees totaling at least $200, you have to factor in the travel expenses and time as well. The UGA offers a chance for your dog to earn their title in one day, providing two hunt test runs per event and giving owners a chance to earn their ribbon in one venue for $99. “Dog training and hunting are expensive enough, we wanted to offer a worthwhile hunt test experience for the whole family at a reasonable price”, said Eder.




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Snowshoe Building Course offered near Cedar Rapids

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Deadline to sign up is Nov. 26!

Snowshoe Building Class
This winter Linn County Conservation will again offer the opportunity to build a pair of traditional snowshoes. Conservation Education Specialist Chuck Ungs will guide participants through the snowshoe-building process at Wickiup Hill Outdoor Learning Center, 10260 Morris Hills Road, Toddville IA - just outside of Cedar Rapids. Those who have taken the class in the past have been very pleased with the finished shoes and have enjoyed the class. These sets would make a unique gift, functional tools or can be used as a grand decoration.

Participants should plan to attend the evening sessions on Thursday, December 5, 12 and 19. These evening classes will run from 7:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. at Wickiup Hill Learning Center near Toddville. With some time invested at home, kits can be completed around New Year’s. Additional evenings will be needed to varnish the shoes in the evenings at the Conservation Department shop located at 1890 County Home Road in the week following construction, between the Holidays. For best results, two or three of these evenings will be required to varnish the shoes properly.

Participants must pre-register and pay by November 26, so we can order kits. The $185 class fee includes the cost of a snowshoe kit, a binding set and varnish for each participant. To pre-register or for more details and options, call 319-892-6485. Attendance at all three lacing sessions is highly recommended. Kit building typically requires the manual dexterity of someone high school age or older. Class size is limited to 15.


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Second Annual Trout Fishing Derby

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October 5, 2013 - Saturday
after 7:00 a.m. for registration & rules at Manchester Fish Hatchery, 22693 205th Ave. Manchester, IA

Report back with catch BY 3:30 p.m.

Come and experience this second of its kind tournament for Iowa.
Stop by the Hatchery to register and receive the tournament emblem handout (necessary for participation) before
the competition begins. Bring your digital camera and download cord to compete for prizes. Once you’ve caught your prize trout, snap a photo of
your fish with the with the tournament emblem. Return to the Iowa
DNR Trout Hatchery by 3:30 p.m. to be included in
the competition. A light meal and fellowship time follows before
the prizes are awarded. Advanced Registration by 9/23/13 to be eligible for an earlybird prize. All should register by calling 563-927-4141 or e-mail macc@manchesteriowa.org

Limited to 50 participants. Cost:
$25 per registrant, must register by Sept 30 - kids (under 12) can be registered for $5 with a participating adult.

Special Notes: All Iowa DNR
rules and regulations apply. Proceeds will go to fund future stream improvements. Join us on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/DelawareCountyTroutFishingTournament?ref=hl
and check out the website at www.neiatrouttournament.com


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Native American Cultural Day near CR 8/24

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Native American Culture Day at Wickiup Hill Outdoor Learning Center 10260 Morris Hills Rd Toddville
10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Native American Day at Wickiup Hill will be another entertaining and educational day for Linn County residents and visitors. This year, the event will highlight Jerome Kills Small with Turtle Island Storytellers Network. Watch a video clip below with Small presenting "Lakota Children's Stories" at the Native American Conference at South Dakota State University Feb. 20, 2010 at Brookings SD.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Rfup6GzGIc&feature=youtu.be

Admission runs $5 per eprson or $10 per family. No concessions are planned at this time. Please feel free to bring lawn chairs or blankets to watch the Native American dancers.

For more information please call 319-892-6485.


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DOVE HUNTING SEMINAR

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On Saturday, August 10th starting at 8:30AM the Banner Shooting Range Staff and the Red Rock Wildlife Unit Biologist will be providing beginning dove hunters an opportunity to learn about dove hunting in Iowa. The program will review the many aspects of what is needed to participate in dove hunting. Including the following general topics:

· Dove behavior

· Dove hunting regulations

· Equipment (clothing, firearms, ammunition, field accessories, etc.)

· Safety and appropriate hunter behavior in the Field

· Typical dove flight characteristics

· Where to hunt

· Range time (Optional for those who want to pay for range time – 5 stand sporting clays will be set up with simulated dove hunting scenarios)


Participants should gather at the north concession building around 8:15AM with presentation to begin at 8:30.

P 515.961.6408 | BannerRange@dnr.iowa.gov


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Iowa’s 2012 Pheasant Harvest Increased 45 Percent

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Iowa DNR press release



Iowa’s pheasant harvest increased 45 percent in 2012, which was the first increase in harvest since 2005. Hunters harvested an estimated 158,000 roosters, lead by northwest Iowa, and followed by central and north central regions.
Iowa DNR press release


The increase in harvest was expected after the annual August Roadside Survey pointed to a population increase of 18 percent.

“We finally had a mild winter and spring in 2012 and our pheasant population responded,” said Todd Bogenschutz, upland wildlife biologist for the Iowa Department of Natural Resources.

Bobwhite quail, mourning dove, cottontail and squirrel harvest estimates increased as well.

The only decrease in harvest occurred with Hungarian partridge.

The number of small game hunters increased 5 percent in 2012. The harvest estimates are based on a survey of small game hunters.

The 2013 August Roadside Survey is Aug. 1-15, with results available by mid-September


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