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  • AvatarVScott
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    Post count: 48

    That bull barrel Ruger is a hard gun to beat but I’m guessing the lever action is fun to use as well. An hour well spent it looks like.

    AvatarVScott
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    Post count: 48
    in reply to: SURPRISE x 2 #1636696

    Catching the unexpected is always fun and I’ve had similar stuff happen. Up on the Miss I’ve caught both a cat and a walleye while bass fishing with a spinnerbait. Both times that seemed kind of odd. Once on Coralville while fishing for white bass with smaller rattle traps I caught three flatheads in a row. The biggest was a little over 8 lbs. The tackle I was using was less than perfectly suited for that kind of fish. That was a blast though. One more, a dogfish (bowfin) while crappie fishing up on the Miss with a long rod. It was probably about a 2 lb fish but that wasn’t something I wanted to see and thought it was going to break my rod. I know someone that has a 5 lb+ dogfish mounted on the wall, what a hoot…

    AvatarVScott
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    Post count: 48

    I have a .222 Remington 788 that I purchased new shortly after that model was discontinued in the early 80’s. It really is an awesome gun and qualifies as a “tack-driver” with custom loads. It has a Bushnell 3-9×40 on it, nothing fancy but it works for me. I wouldn’t have any concerns at all shooting PD’s at 200 yds.

    AvatarVScott
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    Post count: 48

    No preference here, both are good. As mentioned it just depends on the situation. I don’t use “worms” as much as I used to and usually lean towards other plastics. If I do use a worm my favorite is a Zoom Mag II, a 9.5” worm. Using just the back half of that same worm is also a favorite trailer for bass jigs. As far as equipment needed I believe they both pretty much fall into the same category. When using jigs however I usually go to a slightly heavier rod but everything else is the same.

    AvatarVScott
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    Post count: 48

    Dirt
    I have no idea what kind of fuel pump they put in, the invoice doesn’t specify. The check engine light never comes on, a good thing I think. I changed out the plugs the very morning the pump went out. Cap and rotor were replaced two years ago and there’s obviously a little corrosion inside but not bad. Buffed that stuff up a little and the top of cap is fine. The wires are four years old but after checking the spark at both ends they seem fine? I certainly appreciate all of your input.

    AvatarVScott
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    Post count: 48

    I have a ’94 Silverado (5.0L) and it has almost 249,000 on it. Just a couple months ago the fuel pump went out but not without warning. It started hesitating when I would take off from a stop and got progressively worse over a several day period. It wasn’t until I went to the parts store to get a fuel filter that it finally went dead. That was the first time I’d had that truck towed. It had about 70,000 (?) on it when I got it in 2004 and I never once changed the fuel filter. It was always one of those things that I’d say I would do myself later and never got around to it. $500 plus tow later a lessen was learned. That may have been the original fuel filter for all I know? Of course that’s an after thought. Had I actually changed out that $13 part once in a while I’m guessing all would be well to this day. A couple of fuel lines were in pretty bad shape and of course the filter were also replaced. I work nights so my wife picked up the truck from the shop for me. Later she told me how great it seemed to be running before it died about three blocks from the shop. So they redid that and told her that the first pump they put in was apparently defective. I suppose that can happen but found it kind of odd. However she didn’t think it ran as good coming home the second time. It still hesitates a little coming out of a stop but is easy enough to throttle trough. Very similar to when the pump started going bad but to a lesser degree. It’s consistent and not any worse than two months ago. Maybe Dirt can offer some insight? Regardless, I personally wouldn’t replace a fuel pump if it’s working ok. With that age of vehicle with that many miles there will no doubt be plenty of other stuff to spend your money on in the near future.

    AvatarVScott
    Participant
    Post count: 48

    IMO getting as much exposed hook as possible is key. Don’t bury your hook in the bait and only hook enough to keep the bait on. With gills especially that’s not much at all making them the ideal cutbait so you’re already on the right page there. Razor sharp hooks are a must and that’s something I believe is often overlooked by a lot of anglers in general. Do the old thumbnail test and you’ll find that most standard hooks need to have a file taken to them. If you get hung up on something even for a short moment the hook should be checked and may have to be replaced.

    AvatarVScott
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    Post count: 48
    in reply to: Cut bait #1789552

    Gills are the best because of their tough skin. Of course they have to be legally caught before hand and then put on ice right away. I guess I’ve never used the head and always favored the first cut behind that. About a ¾ to1 inch cut on a suitable sized gill that ends up about 3.5-4 inches long is almost perfect. A 4/0-5/0 straight shank through the top skin fully exposed will hold on just fine. You don’t want it to spin in the current assuming your fishing a river. That’s a key factor and why I’ve never used the heads. Shad are just down right disgusting and I won’t touch the darn things. Chubs get soft and aren’t very durable. Green sunfish are ok but not ideal, they also have kind of a soft skin.

    AvatarVScott
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    Post count: 48
    in reply to: bike fisherman #1914540

    I used to do the bike/fishing thing and had what I thought was a perfect setup, light and simple. A trapshooting pouch w/belt will accommodate a couple of smaller Plano’s plus whatever. Ideal for bank fishing and easily strapped to the handlebars. One-piece rod strapped under the bars and seat.

    AvatarVScott
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    Post count: 48
    in reply to: Survey #1930251

    Flathead: 19 lbs Cedar River
    Channel: 12 lbs Cedar River
    Bait: cutbait (fresh gills on ice)

    IMO liver, shrimp, stink and such are only good for smaller “eating size” fish. Larger fish want some meat. Flatheads willl eat the big cutbaits too.

    AvatarVScott
    Participant
    Post count: 48
    in reply to: Reloading #2039984

    Viking_hunter brought up the reloading manual and if you don’t already have one that’s the first thing you need to get. The “how to” and “what you need” stuff is all in there. Most of the essentials have already been mentioned. Underlining a couple items definitely get a bullet remover. You’ll need that when setting up your seating die. A hand-primer is the only way to go. I have a Lee but would assume they’re all pretty much the same. You can feel the primer being seated correctly and tell if primer pockets are starting to expand.

    AvatarVScott
    Participant
    Post count: 48

    It’s been so long since I’ve posted on this site that I forgot my username/password and had to start over. Regardless, when I saw this thread I felt like putting in my two cents.

    I live in CR and used to fish the river for cats on a regular basis. I never kept anything and had no interest in “eating size” fish. So I can’t offer much for catching those. However for catching larger fish I thought the way I did stuff worked pretty well.

    Nothing but cutbaits from ice out through the entire season. Stink baits, shad guts and all that other stuff in my opinion is only good for smaller fish. Not to mention just plain disgusting. The chubs or big shiners that you might be able to get in a bait shop are ok but get soft pretty fast in warmer water. The best bait without a doubt is a cut bluegill. The only way to legally acquire gills for bait is go bluegill fishing. I’ve got a “honey hole” where those can be jerked out of the water in short order, most of the time… Those should be put on ice immediately and you’re good for the next day.

    The nice thing about gills is the fact that their skin is really tough. Cut off the head, never used that, and then about an inch section next to put on the hook. That’s usually
    about a 1”x 3”-4” piece, perfect. Using a 4/0 or 5/0, hook through just a small piece at the top so your hook is pretty much completely exposed. That skin is so tough the bait is never going to fly off.

    Slip rigs using a bead and usually a couple of rubber bobber stops allow for easy leader length adjustment. Depending on how fast the water is moving that’s usually 4-10 inches. You don’t want your bait spinning in the current.

    20-25 lb Big Game line is what I have on my cat rods but on slightly heavier reels than a 5500. A person needs some stout equipment to pull even a five-six pound fish against strong current when there’s a bunch of junk right behind where the fish could go if it was given too much line.

    The seven-minute rule, if you don’t catch anything within that time frame move. If there are active fish in the area they’ll usually smack you within the first two-three minutes.

    90% of all the bigger cats (channels) I’ve caught have come from water four feet or less. No current, no fish, active fish are going to be around moving water. Flatheads like cutbaits too but usually in deeper water. Again, there must be moving water.

    A bigger channel isn’t going to screw around and will double over your rod almost instantly. Flatheads seem to be a bit more lazy, I could always tell the difference.

    I should also mention Coralville flatheads. Crankbaits. That’s kind of fun even when you’re going after whites.

    A little wordy, but it’s spring.

Viewing 12 posts - 31 through 42 (of 42 total)