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  • TeamAsgrow
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    I just used Flickr to post my first pic with it. I had to make the picture viewable to the public. I am wondering if there is a setting within google cloud that would allow public viewing so it could be shared on this site.

    TeamAsgrow
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    Quote by: TeamAsgrow

    Did anyone take a bite from the heart of their first Deer? The group I was with said it was tradition and if you don’t it is bad luck. One of my friends didn’t take a bite and hasn’t had very good luck since…

    Here is the evidence of me taking a bite of the deer of my first deer.

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    Quote by: Whip

    I have the same question? Also can I upload photos from my verizon cloud?

    I tried to upload from my google cloud and it would not work properly. I have flickr back up my pics on my phone and have not tried to upload with it yet.

    TeamAsgrow
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    Did anyone take a bite from the heart of their first Deer? The group I was with said it was tradition and if you don’t it is bad luck. One of my friends didn’t take a bite and hasn’t had very good luck since…

    TeamAsgrow
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    I was a late bloomer to deer hunting. December 2005, nothing really special of a story. We were pushing through an ox bow slough. A deer got up and headed to me. I missed with the first 4 slugs in my gun. I told myself to focus and the last one hit. Didn’t deer hunt for another couple yhears after that. Shot another with my shotgun and really didn’t care for it. Fast forward a couple years, drinkikng with some buddies I bought a bow off eBay and have been a bow hunter since!

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    Quote by: llewellinsetter

    If one shot makes you dead more shots will make you deader!

    Make sure it is the deadest it can be, keep shooting.

    One of my original Turkey hunting mentors always shot a turkey an extra time on the ground to make sure it wouldnt go anywhere!

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    Quote by: Whip

    TeamAsgrow But I have seen birds recover from a shot, so I keep shooting until they hit the grass!

    I feel the same way about elk, upland birds and ducks keep pouring it on.

    My current dog isn’t near the hunter as my last, but either way I dislike watching my dog take a 1/4 mile retrieve when I could have shot the bird again and had a 45 yd retrieve!

    Plus I shoot cheap shells I keep burning them up :mrgreen: :mrgreen:

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    The lighter the line and longer the pole will also increase distance without whipping your minnow off the jig by trying to cast like a mad man.

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    Quote by: TrapCyclone

    Quote by: TeamAsgrow

    Both will kill dead (or deader for some of you :mrgreen: ). Some areas require non-toxic shot. If you are a duck hunter and have a load your gun already patterns/shoots well, then it will work for pheasants. Goes back to practicing with the load. I usually shoot #2 steel. I shot a rooster right before Christmas, he got up to my right side and I shoot worse heading to my right. I got him with the first shot and he would have fallen but I shot again to knock him down so he didnt skid out onto a pond with questionable ice. He was not dead when we got to him, but he had a broke leg and two broken wings, he would have died shortly from the amount of pellets in his guts. I don’t think Lead would have killed him dead compared to the steel I was shooting. Either way, we got him, my positioning which led to my shooting stance was my primary reason for having to shoot twice in the air. But I have seen birds recover from a shot, so I keep shooting until they hit the grass!

    This is one of the reasons why I like Federal Prairie Storm. When using standard 2 3/4″ lead or steel loads many times the bird will hit the ground merely injured and, depending on the type of injury, either takes off running or needs something extra to be put down. However, when I shoot them with Federal Prairie Storm loads, more often than not they drop dead right out of the sky and are dead on the ground when I retrieve them. Hence, the term “dead right there.” So I don’t mind paying a little extra if I feel it is going to help me avoid putting crippled birds on the ground.

    A bunch of guys commenting on Field and Stream agree with me, that they get some extra knock-down power from Prairie Storm. https://www.fieldandstream.com/answers/hunting/bird-hunting/hunting-pheasants-quail-and-grouse/anyone-tried-federals-prairie-storm- Of course there are some negative reviews as well and this may be from some guns not patterning well with that load. My experience has been very positive.

    Here’s another good review with some tests on ballistic gelatin which shows that the Saturn-shaped flitestopper pellets leave larger wound channels than round pellets. Also reviewed is the hexagonal-shaped shot from Winchester which the author states also produces larger wound channels and fewer crippled ducks.

    http://www.gundogmag.com/gear-accessories/all-shot-is-not-round-pellet-shapes-shake-up-industry/

    regardless of how he died…he tasted great

    TeamAsgrow
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    Quote by: jrbert

    Quote by: tracyiowa53

    Quote by: TeamAsgrow

    Winchester, and all ammo manufacturers are in the market to make money. If they put a pheasant on the box people are going to buy that to pheasant hunt and pay twice as much. Look at all of the “new” premium ammo options…it is dizzying. Buy some shells, if they pattern good, shoot them. Aside from turkey hunting, I rarely pattern specific ammo for other wing shooting. Keep the ranges reasonable and you should be ok. My go to pheasant load, is whatever is in the glovebox/vest/whatever I can load into my gun.

    Agreed, in the 70’s when pheasant hunting I could only afford the cheapest shells available and they all killed lots of birds. Never patterned a shotgun, but when I took up turkey hunting where you’re looking for that tight pattern, I tried several different models, but never really had a big difference show up, so again I bought the ones that were the cheapest and they also killed birds, the only ones not killed were the ones when I personally made a hurried/bad shot. My first box of “turkey” shells was a box of 25 Federal 1 1/2 oz. # 6 shot, 2 3/4″ long shells, everyone I used killed a turkey. Everyone has their own way of doing things, so go with what works for you.
    Good hunting, have fun.

    x2. Shoot straight and the ammo will do the rest.

    One question, though, that I do have is overall is steel or lead better for upland?

    Both will kill dead (or deader for some of you :mrgreen: ). Some areas require non-toxic shot. If you are a duck hunter and have a load your gun already patterns/shoots well, then it will work for pheasants. Goes back to practicing with the load. I usually shoot #2 steel. I shot a rooster right before Christmas, he got up to my right side and I shoot worse heading to my right. I got him with the first shot and he would have fallen but I shot again to knock him down so he didnt skid out onto a pond with questionable ice. He was not dead when we got to him, but he had a broke leg and two broken wings, he would have died shortly from the amount of pellets in his guts. I don’t think Lead would have killed him dead compared to the steel I was shooting. Either way, we got him, my positioning which led to my shooting stance was my primary reason for having to shoot twice in the air. But I have seen birds recover from a shot, so I keep shooting until they hit the grass!

    TeamAsgrow
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    Nice job on a great buck! I like the doublle throat patch

    TeamAsgrow
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    Quote by: TrapCyclone

    Quote by: llewellinsetter

    Quote by: TrapCyclone

    Bottom line, I like the more expensive shell I currently use and expect I will keep using it. I also have a reason to do some patterning tests to see how one pattern compares to another just to have a better idea of why one shell may be better than the other.

    Bottom line, if I take the time to better my odds by patterning my gun and find out I can get better performance out of a less expensive shell, I will buy the less expensive one EVERY, SINGLE, TIME.

    But this goes back to my original point. How do you know your better pattern is actually going to kill more birds? For one, maybe the pellets you are using are not capable of impacting vitals. Deke also brought up another great point, namely that the length of the shot string also has an influence on how many pellets actually hit a moving target.

    I understand that patterning your gun is important and it would be beneficial to do that to better understand what is happening. If some cheaper shells look great on the patterning board, when shooting at clays, and in the field then there’s nothing wrong with using those. Some of us just like using more expensive shells and feel it is money well spent.

    Shell manufacturers appreciate your commitment to their new, improved and expensive ammunition.

    TeamAsgrow
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    Quote by: TrapCyclone

    I may be over-thinking things, but I also don’t think the pattern is the be-all, end-all of determining whether a given load is better. Even if you have a dense pattern and get, for example, seven pellets on target from a good pattern as opposed to two pellets from an irregular pattern, this isn’t going to matter if none of those seven pellets are capable of penetrating through and impacting some vitals. Maybe I get only two pellets from my irregular patterning load, but if those two pellets are enough to penetrate the bird’s feathers and have a killing effect then that shell is going to get me more birds.

    Bottom line, I like the more expensive shell I currently use and expect I will keep using it. I also have a reason to do some patterning tests to see how one pattern compares to another just to have a better idea of why one shell may be better than the other.

    The OP was comparing two loads of # 6 shot. If one of those loads puts 7 pellets into a pheasant sized bird vs 2 pellets, it is easy to tell which will kill the bird better. Granted if we shot a dense pattern of #9 shot and put 7 into a bird vs an irregular pattern of #2 pellets into a pheasant with 2 hits than yes that would make a huge difference…

    TeamAsgrow
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    Quote by: TrapCyclone

    Quote by: llewellinsetter

    Quote by: TrapCyclone

    It sounds like the best answer to the OP’s question is to pattern the gun with each load to find out which shoots better then use the results to determine whether the more expensive shells are worth the added cost. My answer is my real-world experiences show that that in some cases the more expensive and fancier loads have worked better in my gun in terms of hit and “dead right there” birds. That said, I definitely plan to go to the patterning board this off-season to get some actual comparisons of the pattern density and distribution between the various shells that I use.

    Aside from the pattern itself, the velocity, shape, and material properties of the shot pellets also influence the performance of the load and these are features that can’t really be measured by shooting at a piece of paper. This is similar to the difference between Hornady XTP and SST muzzleloading bullets. The former is a hollow point meant to expand more on impact whereas the latter is intended more for precision long distance shots. These differences in bullet expansion can’t really be ascertained from just shooting at paper. So in my opinion there are some actual differences in performance between plated and non-plated shot as well as spherical and non-spherical shot. I don’t know if actual studies have been performed, but it seems shooting at gelatin with a feather-covered surface in order to analyze how many pellets penetrate as well as their depth of penetration would be one way to go. I am now curious and just might Google it to see what I can learn on the topic.

    Your real world experiences have to many variables to give accurate results. That’s the point of patterning the gun, once you have pattern results then you can discuss penetration, power, etc. It’s no different than patterning a rifle and then giving results on the bullet and charge based on the deer you shoot.

    I am not sure what you mean by “patterning a rifle.” A rifle could be less accurate (i.e., a worse pattern), but have a better bullet and, hence, result in more kills. I would venture that in at least some instances patterning the gun does not itself finally determine whether a given shotshell is better. I am assuming most of us look for a more even pellet distribution over a predetermined area when analyzing the pattern from a shotgun shell. One load could pattern slightly worse (i.e., have a more irregular pattern), but have better killing or knock-down power due to the type of pellets used and, hence, shoot better since you end up with more dead and/or retrieved birds. Whether it is a better pattern, more killing power, or merely a mental effect, my own personal observation is that I get better results with Federal Prairie Storm loads and I feel it is worth the added cost.

    It is hard to separate fact from fiction form all the discussions and online reviews. However, most seem to agree that properly plated shot outperforms non-plated shot. An example may be found here: https://shotgunreport.com/2012/11/26/plated-pellets/

    I agree that plated shot can have better end results. But if a shell does “kill better” but has large holes in the pattern and you wind up missing what is the point? A dense patter will kill better than an irregular pattern day in and day out, regardless if there is more “killing power” magic.

    TeamAsgrow
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    Quote by: TrapCyclone

    Personally I like to give myself every advantage that I can get. Although 28 extra pellets doesn’t sound like much, sometimes all it takes is one extra pellet properly placed through the eye, brain, or something similar. It also isn’t just a matter of bringing a bird down, but making sure he is down for the count after he falls from the sky. While I don’t have scientific studies to back it up, I feel that we get more injured runners when using cheapish 2 3/4″ shells with nothing but round lead pellets than I do when I use 3″ Federal Prairie Storm shells with copper plated and fluted flitestopper pellets. The copper plating and edges on the flitestopper pellets are supposed to make them a bit slicker with more of a cutting edge so that the pellets are more apt to penetrate through the bird’s feathers and reach vital parts.

    With pheasant hunting being so tough these days, in areas I hunt it isn’t uncommon to walk a couple hours just to flush one rooster. Then when that one rooster comes flying by you better be ready to bring him down and then find him once he is down. As the saying goes, I didn’t come this far to miss. So I don’t mind paying an extra $7 for some extra insurance.

    That increased pay load may not matter if your gun patterns the lighter slower load better. I have tried heavier loads that don’t pattern for squat compared to a lighter load.

    Unless you pattern your gun with each of those shells on paper you are just drinking the Kool-Aide that the manufacturers are pumping out. The flight stoppers are notoriously horrible at making tight patterns.

    TeamAsgrow
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    Winchester, and all ammo manufacturers are in the market to make money. If they put a pheasant on the box people are going to buy that to pheasant hunt and pay twice as much. Look at all of the “new” premium ammo options…it is dizzying. Buy some shells, if they pattern good, shoot them. Aside from turkey hunting, I rarely pattern specific ammo for other wing shooting. Keep the ranges reasonable and you should be ok. My go to pheasant load, is whatever is in the glovebox/vest/whatever I can load into my gun.

    TeamAsgrow
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    Good looking buck!

    TeamAsgrow
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    When I saw the thread title, I thought it was gardening spam…

    TeamAsgrow
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    in reply to: Boots #1558389
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    90% of my how hunting is done with uninsulatex danner mountain lites if it is cold I have an 800 gram pair of cabelas pro outiffer boots. I like lace up leather hunting boots over rubber/neo boots.

    TeamAsgrow
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    Yeah, I clearly didn’t quite read your whole post…but now my secret recipe is out there! :mrgreen:

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