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  • AvatarRuger 204
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    Post count: 197

    Take a look at the Girsan MC312

    If you want the inertia drive at a fraction of the price then check it out!

    AvatarRuger 204
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    Post count: 197

    I just tried to make a post and I don’t see that it took.  Maybe I was flagged as spam as well?

    AvatarRuger 204
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    Post count: 197
    in reply to: Coyote Dogs #1600586

    Where abouts a are you talking?
    If you would rather, just send me a personal message.

    AvatarRuger 204
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    Post count: 197

    Calling only?

    AvatarRuger 204
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    Everyone is about right from my experience. I watched my vet and she taught me to do it so I can moving forward. But if you get into dogs…you will need a vet often, at least i do coyote hunting. You tend to get on the frequent flyer program and cost is usually or can be negotiated and or reduced for the club member which keeps us coming back to make sure it gets dont right.

    good luck with the liter and hope it works out!

    AvatarRuger 204
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    in reply to: Injured dog #1619916

    I run coyote hounds and they just get beat up…sticks impalement, fences, thorns, ice, fights, etc…I have a frequent flier card with my vet of choice.
    They also heal pretty good.
    if you can stop the bleeding and get it glued, thats great.
    generally, they heal on their own.
    you can give some Cephalexin to keep infections down (week or so).
    I use Vetericyn on cuts and tares to keep surface infection down.

    Ears and face generally bleed like crazy, but since they bleed so much…very rarely do you get infections…more coming out than going in on those deals.

    We had a male dog get his penis bit pretty good in a battle not to long ago, about like you are describing. he is healing fine on his own with some cephalexin. However, no one wants to mess with a male dogs penis that’s only mission in life is to catch a coyote. gets a bit western but he is doing great.

    AvatarRuger 204
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    Quote by: Tally+Ho

    As a livestock producer and ground owner. I run hounds for coyotes. I fix more electric fence during the 2 shotgun seasons than the rest of the year from deer being chased thru and ect. I know for a fact farmers in my area rather see a couple of hounds run thru his pasture than a couple of 4×4 pickups fly up on the road with AR-15 sticking out of the window blazing away by his cattle. Seen more animals spooked by rifles and slug shooters than dogs on game! Just my 2 cents.

    On behalf of coyote houndsman or just myself…thank you Tally Ho.

    I run hounds on coyotes. On average a race could last 1-25 miles after its jumped and that could cover 1-10 square mile sections. Sometimes they can run big circles for miles. The dogs have the right away from the conversations I have with my C.O. I have worked hard to stop by all the farmers in the areas I hunt and my group has a lot of respect with local livestock farmers from what I can gather. There have been a few times when the farmer didn’t like the idea for fear that the cattle would spook as was mentioned in previous statements and this can happen for sure. However, most farmers have farm dogs and farm dogs bark and hang around the cattle so most cattle know what a dog and a bark is. In those situations, I ask the farmer to ride along with me to see how it goes through his ground and or as long as he wants to go. My dogs are raised on farms and wont bother cows, hogs, chickens, cats..etc. We do that on purpose for this particular reason.

    On one occasion recently, I took the land owner for a ride along and we watched the coyote run right through his cattle heard trying to lose the dogs and then we watched the hounds run through the herd on the track not bothering the cows at all. Actually the cattle were bothering the dogs and coyote than vice-versa. The farmer thought that was great because he had lost two calves to coyotes previously this year. The coyotes dragged the calves across the fence and killing them where the cows couldn’t protect them. The dogs bother the cows as much as coyotes bother the cows by running through a herd. Every cattle farmer I know greatly appreciates the idea of thinning out coyotes and almost every time they like the idea of running and catching them with dogs than shooting rifles/shotguns across the field. That will stir up livestock more than dogs barking from my experience. If you figure the dogs run 15-25 mph on track…they move through a section and or herd so fast, the cattle don’t experience the disruption for long.

    I always free cast in sections that I have permission for and I got a lot of permission. My reputation precedes me/my group where I hunt and when I knock on the door, most of the times I get “oh yeah..I heard about you guys in town and go right ahead and thanks for stopping by to ask”

    It does happen and sometimes I catch on land I don’t have permission to. In those situations, I get out my plot book and find the owner or someone I know that knows the land owner to call him for me and I get it before walking in to sort it out. I don’t shoot so most farmers appreciate that fact and half of them want to ride along for awhile in which I always entertain. But the interpretation of the law that was told to me by my C.O. is (and I’m paraphrasing of course for you sticklers out there) that if your dogs catch the game on private ground…the hunter has permission to retrieve both the dogs and the game on that ground if they walk in without any weapons. I don’t know how that pertains to concealed carry licenses though…that may be a loop hole but I don’t test my luck in that regard.
    I know my C.O watches and follows this forum. I hope one of them will chose to step in and help to clarify this point for us, that would help to set it straight with how the laws read today around this style of hunting until the day they change.

    Sometimes a hunt does not go as planned and we try to either catch up the dogs and avoid the negativity the best we can. There are lots of other places to go.

    Bad apples in every group, but don’t generalize. I had a gun hunter this weekend shooting at a coyote in a corn field that turned and ran right down the fence line I was parked on for 30 minutes just to see how this was going to play out…he kept shooting as the critter was running right towards me. I think 7 shots in total and I had to lay on my horn to get his attention to stop shooting and I was trying to turn the critter away from me so I was out of the line of sight.

    If you see us on the road and you have concerns, stop and talk to us. You will get a smiling face and we generally appease all concerns to the best of our ability whether your a once acre homestead or a 1,000 acre farmer. This is the attitude you will get from the hound hunter that enjoys the sport, does it legally and wants to ensure the sport remains as it should for the future to come.

    quick tip…buy your new licenses, its a new year now!

    AvatarRuger 204
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    Post count: 197

    Quote by: scruffy

    bipods and shooting sticks eat less dog food though. 😆

    That they do…maybe I should get some bipods

    AvatarRuger 204
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    Post count: 197
    in reply to: Training collars #1620514

    I wont use anything but the Garmin Alpha with the TT10 or TT15 collars. I switched from the TT10 to the TT15 in order to be able to have the bark indicator ability.

    I coyote hunt though any my dogs cover miles very quickly so I need to be able to keep up with them and this system seems to give me that power fairly easily.

    You can track, vibrate, tone and shock from one collar. Pretty nice deal.

    You will pay for it though.

    AvatarRuger 204
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    Post count: 197

    The perfect bi-pod recommendation is 3-4 foxhounds.
    you will find, see and catch more than you could with your bi-pod.
    😆

    Good luck and have fun!!!

    AvatarRuger 204
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    Post count: 197

    I say give it a shot. Its better than sitting on the couch and you never know the adventure you will find when you venture outdoors.

    I agree about the hunting pressure and I agree about the high population of coyotes.

    I used to call on public all the time. I was about 20% successful i would say to be honest. Most of the time, I struck out for one reason or another but I enjoyed every hunt.
    The last couple years, I turned it up a notch. I decided to raise some hounds. I send my hounds in and they find the coyotes for me. Then the race is on.
    Good luck.

    AvatarRuger 204
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    Post count: 197

    Glock G23

    I actually like the following holster for the truck. website link below by Gum Creek

    http://www.gumcreekcustoms.com/chevy-photos-26.html

    AvatarRuger 204
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    Post count: 197

    if you dont mind me asking…what was your best and worst coyote price…
    did you skin them or take them in whole?

    AvatarRuger 204
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    Post count: 197
    in reply to: Need a live trap #1621607

    If you have any more problems…I live in Ankeny and have a live trap. I would take the animals as well. They wouldn’t be back to bother you.
    just let me know

    AvatarRuger 204
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    Post count: 197
    in reply to: Black Friday #1623950

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 169 total)