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  • flyfishr
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    in reply to: Weight of boat #2082275
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    We have a 161 Smokercraft with a 85hp johnson. The trailer, boat, motor, with a full tank of gas and all the fishing gear weighs between 2000 and 2100 #. The most important part is you don’t want to go over 10% of the total weight for tongue weight. In other words 2000# (total trailer, boat, motor, full tank of gas & gear) equals 200# tongue weight or slightly less.

    flyfishr
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    Yep sounds like the rubber bushing that is pressed on to the hub and into the prop is shot. If you want to use the boat over the 4th of july weekend why don’t you take the prop off and take it into a marine shop nearest you that works on Merc’s and see if they have one that will fit your motor and then see if they can repair your old one. It never hurts to have a spare prop for emergencies.

    flyfishr
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    Sounds like the 1st of Sept you could have a squirrel shoot and feed. 😉

    flyfishr
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    Quote by: iowavf

    It’s a hook latch for either a side or floor of a trailer and you can move them as needed and you put the hook of the rachet strap in the ring. Usually on a closed traler.

    This is the correct answer we used ones similar to this to tie windows up and secure the load on semi trailers with avex strapping at the window plant before it closed.

    flyfishr
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    in reply to: basspro shop #2084368
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    I might add that this is the second store for Bass Pro in Iowa

    flyfishr
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    in reply to: excess deer meat #2084559
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    What about the HUSH program? Might try contacting a C.O. and see if they would take it.

    I see nothing wrong with taking as many deer that you can get tags for as long as it will be used. I took 9 (all does) myself during the 2008-09 season. 3 I had processed for myself (almost all gone 😥 can’t wait till next season gets here) , 3 I gave to HUSH & 3 I gave to a cousin. And I still, along with my other hunters haven’t even made an impact on the deer numbers in my area.

    flyfishr
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    in reply to: $580.68 Deer Tag #2085117
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    Quote by: sep0667
    I understand where your coming from and you know your stuff and that’s great that you let residents hunt your land. But it just doesn’t sit right with me that someone from out of state can own the land across the street from me and only show up once a year to hunt it while I’m here the whole time. If you have the money all the power to you, its yours you should be able to do what you want with it right? but it just doesn’t seem right to me. This is just my opinion and it really doesn’t matter what I think in the whole scheme but I’m sure there are plenty of others that agree with me.

    Yes and we have enough of these NR land owners in our neck of the woods that do the same thing sep0667. And I think this is contributing to our herd population getting out of whack cause all they want to do is shoot bucks and not only that but when nobodys hunting there it gives all the deer a sanctuary to hide in.

    flyfishr
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    Bean leaf beetle.

    flyfishr
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    Yep like others have said, there are 2 relays (1 for up and 1 for down) under the motor cover. We had this happen on our “78” Johnson 85 hp motor. To get by until we got home we just switched them back and forth. Now on our motor they are located on the back of the motor at the top, 1 on the leftside and 1 on the rightside. They are 1″ x 1″ square and about 1 1/4″ tall and black and hang upside down. When we got home I took the bad one to NAPA and he had one. I think it was around $23. Went home and tried it and that did the trick so I called and had him get me another one and now have the old one that was still good for a spare.

    flyfishr
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    in reply to: DANG!!! #2086559
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    Aw horse feathers, dadgumit, I give up I keep hitting the wrong dang keys. Dang me anyways 😆

    flyfishr
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    Jefro, Thats a interesting statement.

    flyfishr
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    It’s not the price of gas($2.15). It’s the fact that we do not have a job & the economy is in the crapper. Also if you are retired, depending on S. S. & intrest income from savings. The intrest is less than half what it was & half the savinge are gone.

    flyfishr
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    Otter has nailed it. We don’t let many or if any hunt phesants or quail due to the fact we don’t have a very good poputlation of either. Hoping that by doing this will help the population increase and I think that it has as we are seeing and or hearing more roosters and hens. The quail on the other hand are still few and far between.

    But a bad attitude will get you a flat no and maybe never. State laws say you can hunt the dirt & gravel road ditches thats the law. As far as the ditches go I don’t care as long as they are going to park get out and walk the ditch (Or if they have a disability and have the neccesary provisions to hunt the ditch within the law.) and and use a little common sense and stay away from my cattle if they are near there and stay 200′ from my inhabited farmstead.

    But the ones that drive the roads watching for a bird or birds and then jump out when one is spotted and shoot at it from the road or don’t even bother to get out, and shoot from within the vehicle (breaking the law) Those are the road hunters and they are the ones I detest. Actually my term for this last group is slob hunters.

    flyfishr
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    in reply to: Fly Fishing #2088605
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    The excitement of a northern hitting the fly and then running with it trying to drag the flyrod out of your hands can’t be described. One word of advice though know where your stripped line lies and where your fingers on the stripping hand are grasping the line.

    I’ve got 5 spinning outfits……..what do you find me fishing with 95-99% of the time, a flyrod. I have 4 of them.

    flyfishr
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    Not to change the subject here, but I noticed what looks to be part of a LM rollcage in the righthand side of the pic Maceman. Does it belong to anyone I know since I help a friend out who has a LM with pit duties occasionally?

    flyfishr
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    I understood exactly what Maceman said & meant. It didn’t bother us at all & yes we have ditch hunted. It seems to me that some just want to interpret things the wrong way.

    flyfishr
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    I said road hunters. I did not say ditch hunters. We have never had a problem with ditch hunters. There is a big difference.

    flyfishr
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    I think you will find a lot of farmers who have a bad experience’s with road hunters. I know we have.

    flyfishr
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    in reply to: calf killer #2090304
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    Quote by: Brad+Husman

    Interesting topic and yes I believe yotes will pick off new born calves. I saw a study once on the impact of coyotes on wild sheep pop in Arizona once, can’t remember what species of sheep but it gave the coyotes a big % of the drop in surviving offspring. The main reason I thaught I’d respond I noticed a couple of guys wondering why farmers are dumping there deads. A few reasons of late is a new law forbidding the processing of any beef from cattle over 36 months of age, so local rendering companies either won’t pic them up or charge a high fee because they have to remove the brains and spinal cord before they process the animal. The law is in place to keep the spread of mad cow [ chronic wasting diesease] from spreading. Which the only three documented cases in the U.S. were traced back to Canada. Second most companies have increase their rates any way so some guys are opting to dispose of their own.

    chronic wasting disease is not mad cow disease or scrapie.

    Chronic wasting disease:

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) of mule deer, whitetailed deer, elk (wapiti), and moose. TSEs are caused by unusual infectious agents known as prions. To date, CWD has been found mainly in cervids (members of the deer family). First recognized as a clinical “wasting” syndrome in 1967 in mule deer in a wildlife research facility in northern Colorado, USA, it was identified as a TSE in 1978 and has spread to a dozen states and two Canadian provinces.[1] CWD is typified by chronic weight loss leading to death. There is no known relationship between CWD and any other TSE of animals or people. Although there have been reports in the popular press of humans being affected by CWD, a study by the CDC failed to find any relationship.[2]

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), commonly known as mad-cow disease (MCD)

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), commonly known as mad-cow disease (MCD), is a fatal, neurodegenerative disease in cattle, that causes a spongy degeneration in the brain and spinal cord. BSE has a long incubation period, about 4 years, usually affecting adult cattle at a peak age onset of four to five years, all breeds being equally susceptible.[1] In the United Kingdom, the country worst affected, more than 179,000 cattle have been infected and 4.4 million slaughtered during the eradication programme.[2]

    It is believed by most scientists that the disease may be transmitted to human beings who eat the brain or spinal cord of infected carcasses.[3] In humans, it is known as new variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD or nvCJD), and by February 2009, it had killed 164 people in Britain, and 42 elsewhere[4] with the number expected to rise because of the disease’s long incubation period.[5] Between 460,000 and 482,000 BSE-infected animals had entered the human food chain before controls on high-risk offal were introduced in 1989.[6]

    A British inquiry into BSE concluded that the epidemic was caused by cattle, who are normally herbivores, being fed the remains of other cattle in the form of meat and bone meal (MBM), which caused the infectious agent to spread.[7][8] The origin of the disease itself remains unknown. The infectious agent is distinctive for the high temperatures at which it remains viable; this contributed to the spread of the disease in Britain, which had reduced the temperatures used during its rendering process.[7] Another contributory factor was the feeding of infected protein supplements to very young calves.[7][9]

    Scrapie

    Scrapie is a fatal, degenerative disease that affects the nervous systems of sheep and goats.[1] It is one of several transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), which are related to bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE or “mad cow disease”) and chronic wasting disease of deer. Like other spongiform encephalopathies, scrapie is caused by a prion.[2] Scrapie has been known since the 18th century (1732) and does not appear to be transmittable to humans.

    The name scrapie is derived from one of the symptoms of the condition, wherein affected animals will compulsively scrape off their fleece against rocks, trees or fences. The disease apparently causes an itching sensation in the animals. Other symptoms include excessive lip-smacking, strange gaits, and convulsive collapse.[3]

    Scrapie is infectious and transmissible among similar animals, and so one of the most common ways to contain scrapie (since it is incurable) is to quarantine and destroy those affected. However, scrapie tends to persist in flocks and can also arise apparently spontaneously in flocks that have not previously had cases of the disease. The mechanism of transmission between animals and other aspects of the biology of the disease are only poorly understood and these are active areas of research. Recent studies suggest that prions may be spread through urine and persist in the environment for decades.[4]

    flyfishr
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    in reply to: baby rabbits #2090602
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    We don’t mind seeing a few bay rabits around.

Viewing 20 posts - 1,201 through 1,220 (of 1,243 total)