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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 264 total)
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  • Avatardingmo
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    Post count: 426

    Most consignment shops take a healthy cut off the sale price. Unscrupulous ones will low ball you, buy the guns themselves and resell them (had this happen to me once).

    The approach you take depends greatly on the kinds of guns. Recent manufactured guns in good shape are easy to place a value on. Rare or really old guns can be harder to value ( and also sell). Run of the mill guns are best sold locally. Rare or exotics are usually best sold online, more buyers willing to pay a premium. In either case, often a local gun dealer (FFL) will assist with the transaction for a fee.

    A local auctioneer is a great route as well if you find one who sells lots of guns. They will also take a cut of the sale price – percentage varies greatly. I’ve seen beat up guns sell for much more than similar new ones. If the guns are a sideline of the auction, I’ve picked up some great deals.

    Pretty easy to sell yourself and will return the most $. Go to Gunbroker (or similar) to determine what the guns are selling for – use the completed auction search to see what they actually sold for; not what they were listed for. List on this forum or similar (gunlistings.org or Armslist.com are free ads). Put in conditions that buyers must be legally able to own – I prefer they have a CCW or Permit to Acquire for my protection. Do a bill of sale (provides proof who you sold to). Meet buyers in a public place to keep safe and or take a buddy with you.

    Happy to lend a hand – sent you an email with contact info.

    Avatardingmo
    Participant
    Post count: 426

    Had mine three years. After first year, bought a pair for my son. They are comfortable to walk on in my Mucks – decent orthotic. The sets I bought were the orange ones. Three position heat: Off, Medium and High. Weird how they work; my feet didn’t get hot – but I noticed they weren’t cold even in below 0 temps sitting in a tree.

    I recharged them after each day while my boots were on the dryer (recommended!). Careful pulling them out, easy to rip off felt tabs.

    Noticed this year that mine aren’t working. My son also said his don’t work this year, but he walked many more miles on his than I did. Was thinking about buying a replacement set, but $100+ for two years will buy a bunch of the chemical toe warmers that work as good.

    Avatardingmo
    Participant
    Post count: 426

    Congrats Miller! I’ve done a few antelope hunts – Whip is right. The better the meat is cooled down and processed the more palatable it is. I hunted around Newcastle – both goats we took we at the processor within an hour of field dressing, temps in low 50s. The meat was excellent! A bit different than our corn fed deer, but we liked the sage flavoring.

    We hunted public land exclusively – be careful to research how much public land available in the area you select. The second year I hunted we ended up with our third choice. Very little public land – just one long narrow strip. I was looking at a decent goat at 200 yards, but didn’t shoot because it was mid-80s in temp and we were 5 miles from the truck. I’m too old and lazy to think that was a good idea. The two youngsters with me ended up shooting goats that far away and pretty much drug the hide off of them getting them back to the truck. 3-4 hours later at the processor; the animals smelled a bit gamey… I passed on invitations for the BBQ!

    Antelope in WY are a great intro to big game out of state hunting. No guide required. I do recommend a good GPS, esp. one with landowner boundaries marked. Land out there is really a checkerboard; lots of public land looks good but has no public access. I’ve heard landowners can get testy for trespassers – just like we get in Iowa.

    I need to get back out and hunt mulies or elk…

    Avatardingmo
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    Post count: 426

    Thanks for your helpful replies – I guess deer and humans both like to take the easy trails.

    twdenney – Really? Can you be constructive or helpful? People like you are why the site loses good posters.

    Avatardingmo
    Participant
    Post count: 426

    I’d suggest a muzzleloader as well since you can control the loads. If you opt for a shotgun, ensure it has enough weight to help minimize recoil. I bought my son a Mossberg 20ga youth combo – nice and light – kicked like a mule, esp. with slugs.

    Avatardingmo
    Participant
    Post count: 426

    The guns are all from a few years ago. The case the firearm was seized in has to be finalized and then a holding period before the guns can be sold. Most are likely 3+ years after the crime. In this period, the guns are stored. Keep in mind the guns are not cleaned, inspected, etc. I’ve seen some pretty rough guns at this auction go for premium prices – often more than new.

    Avatardingmo
    Participant
    Post count: 426

    Reminds me of one of my favorite stories. When my son was 13, he shot his first deer with a Remington 308 during the late season when you could use rifles in southern Iowa. We gutted the deer and left the pop up blind up about 100 yards from the gut pile. He went back to the blind the next day and he shot 3 crows with the 308 – two of them with one shot!

    Avatardingmo
    Participant
    Post count: 426
    in reply to: Tikka Advice #1574453

    I’m a fan. Hard to find a rifle that consistently shoots MOA or better with factory ammo. Good light package. Stock feels chintzy, but workable. Hard to go wrong with a Tikka.

    Avatardingmo
    Participant
    Post count: 426

    Remington 1100 or 11-87 are both decent and come as left handed and can be found as used deals. Benelli makes left handed guns, but they are pricey.

    Found a link to a story on left handed shotguns: http://www.gundogmag.com/gear-accessories/9-best-left-handed-shotguns/

    Avatardingmo
    Participant
    Post count: 426
    in reply to: Bow Coaching #1582669

    I’m in Slater. No good buddies who bow hunt, except my son.

    Avatardingmo
    Participant
    Post count: 426

    Guess I don’t need to go to Nebraska to fish…

    Avatardingmo
    Participant
    Post count: 426

    Out of state landowners do not get landowner tags. They are required to submit to the draw and pay nonresident fees.

    Avatardingmo
    Participant
    Post count: 426

    After paying principle and interest on the loan, taxes on the ground and upkeep (mowing, diesel, tractor maintenance, fence repair, cutting trees, etc to comply with CRP rules) – I’m wondering why I need to pay anything to hunt land I own…

    Avatardingmo
    Participant
    Post count: 426

    For all day fishing out in full sun – hard to beat Maui Jims. Not cheap, but your eyes will love them. No eye strain or headaches.

    Avatardingmo
    Participant
    Post count: 426

    Message sent. Thanks for making it easy!

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 264 total)