Forum Replies Created

Viewing 3 posts - 1 through 3 (of 3 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • AvatarDanceswithSkunks
    Participant
    Post count: 5
    in reply to: Trees and Shrubs #1816627
    Up
    0
    Down

    Red Oak are native to lower elevations up North. They do better in low areas near streams and waterways.
    Red Oak produce acorns yearly while White Oak produce every other year. Acorn production is very finicky. A stand of Oak in one area may have little if any acorns while 5 miles away a woodlot full of Oaks could be dropping so many acorns it would be hard not to step on one.

    Sawtooth Oaks would be my choice for an Oak. Sawtooths will begin to produce acorns when they reach 7 years of age in good areas, fertile with adequate rainfall.

    I don’t plant Oaks. I fertilize existing Oak. Hammer eight 2 inch pipes in to the ground around the tree at or just short of the tree’s crown radius. Pour water soluble fertilizer in the pipe. The tree you are fertilizing will determine what depth you need to sink the end of the pipe to.

    Many hunters concentrate all of their effort on food. Food plots and Oaks are subject to weather, insects and disease. Deer will utilize a wide range of vegetation as food. It is much easier to make a list of what deer won’t eat than what they will eat.

    I would plant cover species. Softwoods, Cedars, Pines, Yew, Arborvitae etc. A deer’s preferred food source will change. Cover won’t. Cover for the most part is a once and done planting with minimum cultivation, fertilization etc. and will always be there barring disease, insects and storm damage. Button Brush is an excellent choice to plant along streams. I plant several hundred every year along trout streams here to reduce/stop bank erosion.

    AvatarDanceswithSkunks
    Participant
    Post count: 5
    in reply to: micro food plot #1817494
    Up
    0
    Down

    Only need three things for a micro plot. A rake, Roundup, and Rye. For $50 you could put in a half acre. Rake away the leaves and twigs spray Roundup, I use a SOLO Backpack sprayer, then wait 6 to 10 weeks and plant the Rye. Spraying is best done during Fall along with adding Lime for proper pH. Once the Rye is established, Oats and or Fescue can be added. Turnips will last well in to Winter.

    AvatarDanceswithSkunks
    Participant
    Post count: 5
    Up
    0
    Down

    50 pounds is about average for a Yote where I hunt. But then again I’m East of the Miss. My largest was a 98 pound male that was a Yote German Shepard cross. We run them with dogs.

Viewing 3 posts - 1 through 3 (of 3 total)