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  • AvatarCRIA1576
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    My older Hoyt “cam and a half” shoots full length Cabelas carbon arrows and 100 grain heads around 275 fps. I’ve shot spitfire 3 blade and rage 2-blade, and both put big holes in deer and blood trails were consistent and short. However, I’ve also used muzzy 4 blade and thunderhead 3-blade with the same results with similar shot placement.

    Over the years I’ve hit a few deer in the shoulder with both mechanical and fixed heads at less than 25 yards and at steep downward angles. In these situations, I have lost more than I have recovered. Those were bad shots and shot placement will always trump head design. That being said, I think a guy can improve his odds at mitigating animal loss from a liver or gut shot with a larger diameter broad head.

    However, I don’t think hedging penetration results against a shoulder or spine shot should be considered best practice. If you don’t have the angle, it is best to wait for a better opportunity than risk inflicting a slow, painful, suffering death for a glorious animal.

    The other key factor to consider is price. In some cases you can get 6 fixed heads for the same price or less than the new mechanicals. Again, IME, the performance difference is not worth the extra investment.

    Finally, another thing to consider is broadhead vs. field tip performance, and this is really more of a conversation around convenience. For maintaining form and muscle memory, I shoot field tips during the off-season. When I shoot my muzzy 4-blade heads, I have to make minor sight adjustments to correct POI. Once the season rolls around, I completely switch out my bullet points to 4 muzzy practice blades and am good to go. These can be hard on targets and on each other if you shoot too tight of groups. However, following the KISS principle and saving a little money is still more important to me than all the hype around the mechanicals.

    Just my $.02.

    Good luck!

    AvatarCRIA1576
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    Almost 20 years of bow hunting have taught me the following:

    1. First two weeks of November I can expect to see a ton of deer checking and chasing. It can be very difficult to get shots and deer movements are very unpredictable. This is an extremely exciting time to be in the woods, but not necessarily the “best” time to kill a mature deer. Lots of guys kill bruisers from the 7th-10th, and this is a really good time to get kids and newbies in the woods to get them hooked!

    2. Last two weeks of November, especially the last week, I can expect to see less hectic and more predictable activity as most of the does are bred and resume their normal routines. HOWEVER, I can also expect to see a greater number of truly mature bucks from my own and neighboring properties on their feet ALL day long; searching out the last hot does. 5 out of 6 P&Y deer I have been fortunate to kill with a bow were all taken after the 15th of November, and all were taken after 10am. This is also an ideal time for aggressive calling/rattling and spotting & stalking mature bucks in open fields, fencelines, and CRP.

    Looking at the calendar, I will likely start vacation the middle of the week of 11/16 and contue until the middle of the first week of December; assuming first shotgun is 12/5.

    Good luck!

    AvatarCRIA1576
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    Dang!!! Those are some very nice groups for a hand cannon! I think I am going to throw in the towel on my open sights and get a mount and scope for my .45LC. Its time to let the Ruger roar! LOL!

    Thanks for fixing the Linebaugh link too. 😉

    AvatarCRIA1576
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    Deer like that don’t get past me without an arrow getting released in the direction of their vitals. For me it is about shooting mature bucks, and I will never be a guy that passes a deer like this.

    Regarding score, I would agree that he is somewhere around 140 +/-. You don’t really get an idea of beam length from the forward facing angle, and deer in velvet always look a lot heavier than they may actually turn out in hard bone. As a result, his tines will definitely be shorter and his overall mass reduced by the end of the month.

    If he is a 9 and not a ten I woud hedge around 135-140 gross and if he does have another point he may be 140-145. Regardless, with a good shot and hopefully short blood trail, he would look super in either a head/shoulder mount or European skull mount. 🙂

    AvatarCRIA1576
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    in reply to: binoculars #1603645
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    For bowhunting and yote hunting I like an 8×42 as the 10×50 are too big and clunky. I have used fully multi-coated, fog/shock/waterproof Bruntons, Bushnells, and Nikons in this price range, and the Nikons are significantly better in all areas IME. Their glass is much clearer, they draw more light, the magnification knob is much more crisp and less blurry, and they are more rugged. I’ve also had zero problems with fogging, contrary to the Bruntons and Busnells.

    I have owned my current pair of Nikons for around 5 years, and they have ridden in my backpack, on my dashboard, and flopped around in the backseat with the dog without any issues. My top end for riflescopes and binos is around the $2-250 mark, and in this price range the Nikons are hard to beat.

    Good luck!

    AvatarCRIA1576
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    Dont forget about the female lion killed by a deer hunter during shotgun season near Marengo along IA River corridor in 2009.

    http://www.fieldandstream.com/blogs/hunting/2009/12/iowa-deer-hunter-bags-mountain-lion

    AvatarCRIA1576
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    I use H110 for my .45LC reloads and it is a very reliable and good handling product. I also have a Redding single stage press, and the carbide dies are the bomb. No lube and no sticking to worry about.

    One more thing… Regarding the “speed kills” comment, there is some very interesting conversation on this subject as it relates to big bore handguns. I recommend reading some of John Linebaugh’s writings for additional perspective.

    http://www.customsixguns.com/writings/common_sense_handgun_hunting.htm

    One example of the “knock out” theory…

    “Now Taylor was hunting Elephant, Rhino, Cape Buffalo and other dangerous game, plus was using rifles of immense power compared to our sixguns. This I will agree on. But by using this formula, that I believe is absolutely as perfect as humanly possible, to measure a projectile’s effect on a critter, one can realize the power and potential the big bore sixgun possesses. This formula will also show how the said sixgun with it’s big-bore and heavy slugs rates with the popular rifle caliber’s used by many hunters today. Here is a quick comparison:

    .44 Magnum 240 gr. slug at 1400 fps : .430 X 240 X 1400
    divided by 7000 = 20.6 Knock Out (KO)
    .270 Winchester 130 gr. slug at 3100 fps : .277 X 130 X
    3100 divided by 7000 = 15.9 KO

    Interesting huh! It was shocking to me too. Now, you say, there is a bug in the works here ‘cuz you’re comparing a fast high-speed expanding slug against a heavy slow solid type slug. I agree, there are some variations we can argue ‘til the end of time and never solve the problem. But of the dozen or so deer and antelope I have taken and seen taken with a sixgun, the results compared to a comparable rifle are disgustingly similar. The front area on the big slugs do thing I don’t think anyone, no matter how much game he shoots in his lifetime can explain fully or accurately.”

    AvatarCRIA1576
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    in reply to: Saylorville #1603660
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    Whether fishing from shore or a boat, look for current breaks where the main flow is diverted around around a large rock, brushpile, or other obstruction. These areas cause eddies or slackwater behind them where all predator fish will lie in wait for bait. When they are actively feeding they may be immediately behind the obstruction or on the edge of the main flow; darting out to snatch prey items as they come downstream and then returning to the break. When they are more neutral or off the feed, target the main body of the eddy in the slack water itself. From a presentation perspective, from a boat an angler has the advantage of casting crank baits, jigs, spinner rigs, etc…, above the obstruction and guiding the baits along the face of the break. This can also be done with a slip float; letting it follow the break and then move back upstream with the eddy. Fishing breaks in this fashion can often deliver a nice mixed bag, especially below Saylorville and Red Rock where large walleyes, stripers, catfish (channels and flatheads), northerns, and crappies feed heavily.

    If you have a boat, motor up river; marking steep drop offs and underwater structure that hold fish with buoys or with waypoints on your electronics. For these areas you have the options of anchoring above the feature and dropping baits behind the boat to the fish, drifting over them, or trolling upstream across these areas. Depending on the species you are after, vary your presentation appropriately. For catfish specifically, the Whisker Seeker spinner rigs are deadly both troling and anchored up letting the current drive the action.

    I hope this helps and good luck.

    AvatarCRIA1576
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    I have a 9′ flat bottom aluminum Jon that I would let go for $200. PM or text me if you are interested- 515-201-2954.

    AvatarCRIA1576
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    100% agreed on all points. Dad and the Boy Scouts always taught us boys to leave the trail better than you found it. Unfortunately there are a few whose laziness gives all sportsmen and women a bad name. This goes for the detritus that you mentioned in the public hunting/shooting areas to leaving dead fish, night crawler boxes, wrappers, fishing line, botttles, cans, etc…, along the shores and marinas of public fishing areas and rivers. What really makes me angry is when this trash is within inches or feet of trash can or dumpster.

    Wake up people and take what you brought in and then some out with you when you leave. 😡

    AvatarCRIA1576
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    I have a Ruger Bisley BH in .45 LC that I have worked up some pretty stout handloads. I am sure the gun shoots much better than I am capable with open sights, but for me it is still a <50 yard gun.

    For those of you veteran wheel gun hunters, i would appreciate advice on the following:

    -What is your preferred grip for the hard kicking hunting loads? My Bisley has a near vertical grip, but I have not been able to find any pachmyr or similar syle replace stocks for it, and it is a bit slippery. Any tips would be great.

    -When hunting, what is your preferred position and rest? Seated with elbows on knees, seated with bi or tripod, etc…? If using a bi or tripod, where do you engage the rest? Supporting your wrists, supporting the barrel, etc…?

    If I can get comfortable at 100 yards, I would forever put my muzzleloader away and never clean another one again…

    Thank you in advance for the support!

    AvatarCRIA1576
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    in reply to: First Blood! #1604404
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    Cool and thank you for the recommendation.

    AvatarCRIA1576
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    Those are some fine cats indeed. I also have felt and seen the power of a Mississippi river cat strike. During early June on pool 4 north of Wabasha, MN, a guy can catch monster ‘gills on redworms along the railroad rip rap on the MN side. A few years ago we were fishing this pre-spawn pattern and anchored the boat less than 10’ from the rocks on a steep dropoff in a current break. Since we were IA boys fishing with a MN catfish hater, we had to try and double up on a mixed bag and slime his boat up some with some cats. So, we dangled slip floats and red worms on the bank side to entice the ‘gills out of the deep rocks, and threw a smelly cheese bait the locals call “munga” on the channel side with 3/4 oz. slip sinkers and snelled slip-stink worms.

    To say this trip was an absolute ball would be the understatement of the year! Very often a guy would be landing a 9-10″ bull on his UL when a cat would double his other rod over and nearly pull it in the deep water channel. We only had 4 rod holders for 4 guys and 8 rods total, so it got pretty hairy a few times. It was amzaing how a 3-5# channel cat and 5-7mph current combined to strain our gear. Many times we thought Catfish Hunter himself had taken the bait until we got the fish boatside and saw the actual size fo the fish.

    While we approached limits on the big ‘gills, we let all but a few pan fryer cats go back to swim again.

    Good luck and tight lines!

    AvatarCRIA1576
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    in reply to: First Blood! #1604412
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    That’s awesome! Nice work!

    I may have to try this out sometime. I use a Hoyt Ultrasport for whitetail hunting. It is several years old, but spits full length shafts around 290 fps. Do you guys use the muzzy solid fiberglass fish arrow and trocar head? Also, is it better to use the “jar” type line holder or a regular fishing reel?

    Thank you!

    AvatarCRIA1576
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    This is another subject where as outdoospeople we are best to support a singular view, rather than divisive special interests. We need to step back and not lose the forest for the trees. We should all be rallying around a banner that demands more habitat for the good of all species. Any argument to the contrary assumes that less fallow ground and the same amount or expanded row crop = neutral or no impact to pheasants. That is a ludicrous and uninformed opinion. That is akin to saying I can grow the same number of pheasants on bare, plowed ground as in a field of tall grass. Or that pheasants are just as susceptible to raptor predation in tall grass as they are in bare, plowed ground. Come on people…

    Everyone on this thread that bird hunted in the 80’s and since then can go on and on about this or that “observation”. We all hunt different areas in Iowa and the topography, weather, and number of acres in row crop vs. CRP vs. swamp vs. slough vs. drainage ditches vs. etc… are highly variable. My family has spent most of our lives hunting Story and Hamilton counties, and the one thing that has impacted our opening day success and access/availability to hunt birds, more than anything else, is habitat loss. The thousand acres of sloughs, creeks, fencelines, and abandon acreages have been tiled, filled in, torn out, plowed under, and farmed. It is hard to even recognize the area anymore compared to when we were kids. The bottom line is that if there is no habitat, there are no places to hunt, AND no birds. Period. As a result, the one constant that can be easily controlled is habitat, and the probability of having more pheasants is much higher in an area with more, not less.

    History has proven that given the incentive, farmers in Iowa will coalesce around programs that will either help OR hurt habitat. The one positive I have personally observed this year is that the CRP program no longer has a strict requirement that land has to be highly erodible to qualify. In this year’s program a farmer could enroll any piece of property in the program, and if done prior to a deadline, even earn a handsome $100/ac signing bonus. The 80 surrounding my acreage is good, mild, flat, ground and was sowed down this spring. I stopped and talked to the guy doing the work and he said their seeding business had more than doubled this year. On this particular farm the owner is making $400/ac for the next 10 years plus the $100/ac signing bonus in year one. PLUS, for the first time in 12 years owning my acreage, i now have pheasant and quail mommas with broods crossing my yard most mornings to get out of the wet grass. To think that one year cant make an impact on local bird numbers is false, given that there are some birds in the area that survive over the winter.

    Only 67 days until opening day… 🙂

    AvatarCRIA1576
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    in reply to: Rough Fish #1604540
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    My relation has had good luck below the Brushy Creek spillway from the bank.

    I have also seen carp by the thousands sucking air in Iowa City on the Cedar by the sewer plant discharge.

    Pretty much any creek or small river with decent visibility should be good this time of year. You may want to try North or Middle Coon and their tributaries.

    AvatarCRIA1576
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    Agreed on all points with “LL”.

    In 20 years of bowhunting I have learned these lessons the hard way.

    Always approach stand from downwind

    Scout your property thoroughly throughout the year and know where the deer are likley to be coming from in the morning and evening and place stands to accomodate these travel routes while factoring in prevailing winds. Almost all of my stands are set on the east side of where I expect the deer to come from, sometimes veering more north or south, and sometimes on both sides if it is a high traffic area. Prevailing winds in IA in the fall range from SW-NW and the exception is when cold (North wind) or warm (South wind) fronts or precipitation (NE or SE winds) are on the way.

    Do not forget about thermals- scent is likely to be carried up in the morning and down in the evening. Consider this plus the wind when deciding on when to hunt your set. You can have the perfect wind, but an evening thermal can still drift your scent downward off a ridge into a bedding area.

    Don’t go out if the wind is marginal. If you are a weekend warriror like most of us, your time is too precious to risk bumping deer on the way in, while on stand, or on the way out. We can’t all hunt 100 days in the fall.

    Keep wind in your face

    Hunt on windy days, especially during November. Higher wind speeds disperse scent more quickly, cover up your sound walking in and while on stand, and in my experience can really get the deer moving.

    DO NOT BELIEVE THE HYPE AND DO NOT SPEND $600+ on ScentBlocker or ScentLock suits. Nothing will make you invisible if the wind is wrong.

    Carry a simple fresh-earth or odorless cover spray, and douse yourself before and during your walk in to your set and after you get settled. If you can find some evergreen boughs or juniper berries, crush the leaves/berries and rub them on your outer layers. This is a very potent and effective natural cover scent and usually is in ample supply in the woods.

    Perform stand maintenance in August or September, and always try to take a buddy. Slips, falls, cuts, and broken bones can happen really fast, and it is important that somebody can call the cavalry. Spray all stand connections, hinges, washers, etc…, liberally with WD-40 or other penetrating oil and the deer will grow accustomed to the smell before prime time.

    ALWAYS tell your wife, buddy, or family member where you plan to hunt on a given day. If your stands are remote like some of mine, you don’t want people searching for hours and hours if something happens to you.

    Always add another tree step or ladder section. If it is a stretch to get on the platform in the summer in one layer of clothes, it will be damn near impossible with layers on…

    BE MOBILE AND ADAPT. If the wind changes dont let it ruin your day. Get down and find a brush pile, thick grass, or evergreen to hole up in… The 3 largest bucks I’ve taken with a bow were all taken from the ground on an impromptu stalk or sit without a blind (160, 151, 144).

    TRY TO SPOT AND STALK. You CAN effectively stalk a deer, especially during the post rut on windy days. Only move when the wind blows and only when the buck is looking away. If you can see his eyes, he can detect your movement.

    Best of luck to you this fall!

    AvatarCRIA1576
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    in reply to: Perch #1604615
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    There are good numbers and size in 12 Mile down by Creston. Much closer than IGL and also an amazing lake for trophy ‘gills and keepers in a variety of species.

    AvatarCRIA1576
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    Big Creek has quality bluegills, and they can be caught from the fishing jetties all around the lake.

    Beaver Lake north of Dexter (20 minutes from W DSM) has good numbers of crappies and bluegills as well as largemouths and bullheads.

    Badger Creek west of Booneville has good panfishing as well.

    Lake Aqhuabi near Indianola has quality panfishing.

    My buddy has been catching quality bluegills at DMACC pond this year.

    Easter Lake on the SE side of DSM used to have decent fishing.

    AvatarCRIA1576
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    in reply to: Pair of jacks #1604618
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    Hey guys, I am new to the site and loving it already.

    The last jack I saw was a couple miles west of the Ames Lincoln Way exit on the south side of 30 by the ISU test plots. I live near Coon Rapids in W. Central Iowa, and we still had several north of town and between Dedham and Carroll in the late 90s. They all seem to be gone now, and the DNR even closed the season a few years ago. It is likely due to a number of factors.

    1. Lack of multi-crop rotation to alfalfa or seasonal grasses- Back in the 50s, 60s, and 70s, the jacks were super thick in the alfalfa fields statewide. They were so numerous that men could club or .22 a dozen or more a night. My Dad and his buddies would take the carcasses to the Ellsworth turkey processing plant where they were ground for mink feed. The skins were then shipped out of state for rabbit line gloves. In the past 35 years the crop rotation has gone from 3 or more crops to only corn and beans in most areas. Thus you have the loss of primary feed for the big bunnies and reduced preferred cover.

    2. Rise of coyotes statewide- the coyote population has grown year over year in many areas virtually unchecked and they are a key jack predator

    3. Pesticide use

    4. Competition for limited resources- cottontails and other rodents are more adaptable and have a more varied diet

    5. Etc…?

Viewing 20 posts - 501 through 520 (of 520 total)