coydog2019-07-19T04:18:20-05:00

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  • Avatarcoydog
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    Post count: 102

    I heard that. Hope they multiply like roaches. I want one.

    Avatarcoydog
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    Post count: 102

    Not to stray far off the topic. But over my hunt years, Jim. I’ve seen 3 wolves here in central Iowa. 1st wolf was seen circa; 1972. Just SouWest of Rhodes, Ia. 2 of our coyote hounds caught that wolf around 1/4 mile off of the gravel. All 3 fought hard on a hillside. At least once or more times. That wolf had each dog’s head in his mouth. My Dad’s hound weighed 110lbs, he was very large for his breed & built stocky. the other hound was a Walker Hound around 60lbs give or take. Willard & I topped the high hill. Here came both hounds staggering back in the deep snow. Both hounds had puncture wounds on their head/muzzle, neck, chest & shoulders. We packed the wounds with snow. That wolf was huge. A salt & pepper color.

     

    2nd wolf I seen late one night as I rounded a sharp turn on a gravel road. 2 miles South of Marshalltown, Iowa. Wolf was following a beat down deer trail on the hard pack snow. Wolf stopped 1/2 through a spread barbed fence & looked at my vehicle. I suppose I was less than 50′ from it. A large & beautiful wolf. Smoky black in color.

     

    3rd wolf I seen Winter of 04? If I recall.  I seen it 2 miles due East of Green Mountain Iowa. Wolf was very large, long lanky legs. It was a dirty cream color, with a brownish/tan saddle marking on it’s back.

     

    I hope to catch one on camera. Before I get to old to hunt anymore. There are a few nomadic wolves who do pass through Iowa. A rare sight to behold, no doubt.

    • This reply was modified 1 month, 3 weeks ago by Avatar coydog.
    • This reply was modified 1 month, 3 weeks ago by Avatar coydog.
    Avatarcoydog
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    My thoughts are along those same lines, Jim. Who knows Iowa’s pop? But no doubt, it is expanding. I have yet to hear of “mass Iowa lion killings” Finding a fresh track, let along seeing one on permissioned ground. Will be most rare. But I still have hope. Because, I’m relentless.

    Avatarcoydog
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    Jim, I spoke with an experienced lion hunter from AZ some yrs back. As I was gathering 1st hand knowledge of lion behaviors. Trying to obtain as much lion behaviors as I could to get an edge on them. He claimed the lions he was aware of that have an established territory. They will run a circuit on their land roughly on 2 wk interval. When he told me that I thought maybe that was etched in stone? Because I had heard that very thing from a farmer 10 miles south of me. He had seen  similar 2x. But my experience has been they are most irregular. Regularly…irregular in their travels if you will. To date I have spoken with 70+ people who have seen a lion. Including the Counties of; Hardin, Jasper, Tama, Marshall, Grundy & Story. A handful of those people. Have seen a pr of lions & or a female with 2 subs in tow. Now days when someone claims to “know” about their travel patterns. Makes me squint if you get my drift. haha

    Lion I seen around 12 Winters ago. Was sitting between some standing corn & a fence line 3/8 mile out. Lion was facing the Minerva creek to it’s North. I seen that lion around 2.5 miles due West of Albion Iowa.

    Info I have gathered over those last 12+ yrs is. There is/was a female up in Hardin County & 1 in Tama County. With a large male covering those counties. Including Marshall county. I believe the lion I seen West of Albion was the male. Lion was huge. Some kid in M’town will probably tag one with his cork gun. Before I get the chance. No matter. I still hunt hard for my opportunity. It’s all good.

    Avatarcoydog
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    Well happy retirement! When you get there, Jim. Last handful of yrs. Been seeing low coyotes numbers. Of course I’ve been mainly looking in north Marshall & Western Grundy Counties. There is a older guy Marshalltown Trapper. Who hammers the coyotes hard every year. So I expect the low numbers are because of his take. I ran into him one day. He had a pile in the back of his truck. I’ve been seeing low 30’s for a number of yrs now. Not like the late 70’s early 80’s. They were thick back then. I think I seen 81 one Winter if I recall now? I do miss hammering on them I must say. End of last Winter I spotted a sleeping pair out near the 1/4 mile. So tempting so tempting B)

     

    By the way. The Wolf Lake edition is roughly 1 mile SouEast of Marshalltown, Iowa. I’ll hunt that are hard next Winter. My Dad’s coyote hound tree’d a lion behind Riverview Park in Marshalltown. Summer of 68 or 69? I can’t recall now days. My memory is fading. I can’t believe some believe the IDNR released them. Good grief! The lions have always been here. But appear to be populating now more than in the last 100yrs give or take. I hear tell “They” were eradicated from Iowa. Turn of the century? I had no idea the “entire state was fenced in” back then? who knew…. You know…for “the great lion round-up & extermination” haha

    meow

    • This reply was modified 2 months ago by Avatar coydog.
    Avatarcoydog
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    I always liked hound hunting, Jim. That is how I got into predators in the 1st place Fall of 64.  Hope you do well, Jim on the lions. I didn’t know you were a medic? Seems my quest for a one on one is eternal. I regret passing on the one many yrs ago. Had there not been standing corn it walked into. He would’ve been killed that day. I reckon I’m destined to pay for my error. haha

    Avatarcoydog
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    Oh by the way…meow.

    Avatarcoydog
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    I’m not to surprised, Whip.  Another lion was seen a few days ago.  Around 3:30pm roaming the Wolf Lake edition neighborhood. I spoke with one of the guys who seen it. He said it was huge.

    Avatarcoydog
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    Post count: 102

    The coyote trio, I believe is an alpha pr with a yearling female. Some experts claim on rare occasion. A yearling female is held back to raise next years litter. Other’s claim a female is held back. So the male can breed her & pass on his genes. I vote for the latter opinion. From the short time I observed the trio. Top left is the alpha male, top right is the alpha female. Bottom coyote is the yearling. The yearling acted subdued & looking for direction from the other two coyotes. Welp, that’s my story & I’m sticking to it. haha Couple years ago I got to observe a trio from my sisters living room for a few hours that were across a highway laying down on the edge of a picked cornfield. Two were laying close together with the third one always laying by itself about fifty or so yards away. Always there was at least one with its head up while the other ones slept. Once in awhile they would get up to stretch , yawn, make a couple of circles and lay back down. The wind was always coming from their backside. I often wondered why a female would be selected to be held back to help raise her mothers next set of pups. If she was ready to breed I would think that she would be out looking for a date where another male would be picking her up to go to the prom. On the other side of my theory , I would think if she is held back for breeding purposes and if that’s the case, I would suspect that the male wouldn’t be her dad. I could possibly see this happening if something happened to her dad and her mom got a new male. Just my thoughts on this and I would like to here more on this subject. Thanks

    There is a lot I do NOT know about the coyotes. Even observing them for hundreds of hrs over many years. Some behaviors I only seen but a few times. So claiming they are fact, isn’t necessarily true in all cases. But were true as to what I had seen or how it appeared. Much of their behaviors (most) all coyotes will show the same behaviors eventually.

    Some behaviors which have been text book true. Is the wariness of the old alpha female. Time after time I have watched them. They are pretty consistent.

    One Winter day 3 wk in December. I was observing an old alpha pair with their 5 yearlings. Before they all bedded down in a loose group out near the 1/2 mile. The old male walked up to each pup. Took them by the neck & pushed their head & shoulders down on the snow. While the pups hind legs were still standing. The old female sat idly by watching this un-fold. When the old male got to the last pup out of the litter of 5. The old female came over & they both pushed (her) head down on the snow. I believe all of the pups were male, except for the last pup. They held her there maybe 15-20 seconds or so. The next day & the rest of the Winter. All 5 of those yearlings were gone. I believe the old female was coming into heat. Thus it was time to scatter their litter. That alpha pair would have 5 pups each year that I observed. Two yrs in a row. Their yearlings disappeared end of the 3rd wk in December. (I believe) the reason it occurred. Was due, to the old female coming into heat.

    Avatarcoydog
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    Post count: 102

    Notice that pic where the three are in the cornfield, It seems the one watching the other two with its tail between its legs could be the odd man out in this situation. Or could it be a female offspring left over to help rear the next batch of pups? Any thoughts?

     

    The coyote trio, I believe is an alpha pr with a yearling female. Some experts claim on rare occasion. A yearling female is held back to raise next years litter. Other’s claim a female is held back. So the male can breed her & pass on his genes. I vote for the latter opinion. From the short time I observed the trio. Top left is the alpha male, top right is the alpha female. Bottom coyote is the yearling. The yearling acted subdued & looking for direction from the other two coyotes.  Welp, that’s my story & I’m sticking to it. haha

    Avatarcoydog
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    Post count: 102
    in reply to: Female Reds #2946420

    The above kit is 5wks old. Can walk ok, but still a little wobbly & gets tired rather quick. Kits are born the color above with dark slate blue eyes. Their eyes turn all amber by 8+ wks old. By 10-12 wks old. They typically have their full fur color. At 12 wks old they can survive on their own.

    Avatarcoydog
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    Post count: 102
    in reply to: Female Reds #2946419

    Most Reds pair up in the latter part of November-into January.  A little before the coyotes do.  Coyotes pair up latter part of December-into February.

    What I have read from Biologists, as for the Reds…Gestation is 61-62 days. When either canine actually breeds. Is their call.

     

    I read once a guy claimed when coyotes make a kill. They allow other “non-related” coyotes join in on the feast. Not true IMO. Alpha coyotes are territorial & do not subscribe to free handouts to strangers/trespassers.

     

    Avatarcoydog
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    Post count: 102
    in reply to: Female Reds #2946405

    Above is an old Female I’ve observed for numerous yrs. She lived to be 8+ yrs old. Then suddenly disappeared. Word was she was there at that den site 2 yrs prior. So that would make her roughly 8yrs old. She had an Earthen den right next to a field drive culvert. She used them both. Females are the primary caretakers of their kits. Even while there are young in the den. The female will go on short hunts alone in the late evening & early morning. In the evening about an hr before Sunset. She may take some of her kits out exploring, learning & hunting. Kits are weaned by 5 wks old. But will still suckle after that, if the female stays wet & tolerates their pointed milk teeth. I’ve seen early morning a female come back from hunting. Then stand, staring down the entrance hole & call out her pups. They pour out & start to nursing right away. Like they are starving.

    If by the age of 5 wks old. If the female dies or gets killed. Then the male will take over care of the litter. A few yrs back I knew of 6 active den sites in a 7 mile radius. The age of the litter varied roughly 6 wks best I could estimate. One late litter I seen a number of yrs ago. That occurred mid October & those kits were around 11-12 wks old. That was an oddity to see. I would’ve never thought it true. Had I not seen it.

    A few yrs ago. There were 2 other active dens 1/2 mile from her den. Both of those dens only had 2 kits each. So I believe, those young females were her off-spring. Et their kits were sired by the male to the old female.

     

    Last Spring I observed a litter of 14 kits. Farm lady said the female was at least 7 yrs old.

    • This reply was modified 3 months, 4 weeks ago by Avatar coydog.
    • This reply was modified 3 months, 4 weeks ago by Avatar coydog.
    Avatarcoydog
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    Post count: 102

    “I’ve seen & learned plenty just observing. This Winter rounds off my 54 th year predator hunting. Great memories. All I want now is a lion, the frosting on the cake.”

    I haven’t even been on this dirt 54 years! Like to hear the knowledge.[/quote]

     

    A few things; Red Fox do not have near the sharp eye sight as do the coyotes. They’ll also often dismiss ambient sounds around them. Such as a hunter getting near. Coyotes pay attention to ALL noises. So best to stealth in like a stalking cat. As for the Reds. High pitched noises peak their interest much more than deeper base tones. Higher the pitch sound. The more it will peak a Red’s interest.

    Coyotes; They miss very little. Specifically a local territorial older coyote. A pair of coyotes on the move. 99.9% of the time. The female sets the direction & the pace. Where she goes, he follows. She is also, (most often) the last of the two to lay her head down. She is the wariest of the two. When they bed down for the day. An old female is tops. If a hunter can fool her. That is something. When they dig a den or do a “clean-out” The male does the digging. If she doesn’t like his work. She may not accept that den hole & move on elsewhere.

    Coyotes routinely hug the inner 1/4 mile area of a 1 square mile area. Most all of the time. Both coyotes & the Red’s use the up-wind areas mainly as transition areas. To get from one down-wind area to the next.

    Most coyotes are bedded down for the day @ either pre-Sunrise up until 9-10am. Few stragglers on the move after 10am.

    Coyotes territories are roughly 5-7 square miles in total mass in my old hunt areas. Generally the territory is oblong & they often over lap a 1/4 mile or so. With the neighboring alpha pair. I call that over-lap area. The “buffer area” Because a certain degree of trespassing is tolerated by the local pair. When young coyote pups near Winter. They can often be found on the outer area’s of their parents territories.

    If you call in a pair or stalk a pair. Shoot the female 1st. Because often the male will linger some. Maybe offering a shot on him? Same goes for the Reds.

    • This reply was modified 4 months, 1 week ago by Avatar coydog.
    Avatarcoydog
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    Post count: 102

    Sweet! You are correct! A lot of guys kill them and have no clue about them. I haven’t carried a center rifle in a few years if I call them in shotgun range I learn a lot more.

     

    I’ve seen & learned plenty just observing. This Winter rounds off my 54 th year predator hunting. Great memories.

    All I want now is a lion, the frosting on the cake.

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