Why Vacuum Seal Ammo?2016-10-09T19:11:31-05:00

Home Forums Hunting Firearms Why Vacuum Seal Ammo?

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  • AvatarKev-Cat
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    Post count: 1030

    Was in a gun shop today and overheard a couple guys saying they store their ammo for the long-term by vacuum packing with a Food Saver. I hadn’t ever even thought of it. I’ve always just kept mine in a controlled temperature with as low of humidity as possible.

    The only reason I could think of that makes it sound okay to me is if it is sealed in a fairly dry location and then transported and/or stored in a wetter environment.

    I’ve only thought the variables to degrade ammo were temp and moisture.

    To me, vacuum sealing ammo would just reduce the amount of surrounding air but it sure wouldn’t lower the humidity more than where it was sealed. I’ve just watched on You-tube of people doing this too.

    Question: Why vacuum seal ammo? What am I missing?
    Thanks.
    Kev

    Avatarbaccusboy
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    Post count: 404

    Waste of time and money.

    Use sealing Army ammo cans, and throw in a dessicant pouch. Ammo has kept like this for decades, with no issues.

    Avatarhunter94
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    Post count: 1058

    It’s real popular with the “prepper/shtf” community. I suppose it keeps more moisture out and gives the ammo a longer shelf life if you stockpile 10’s of thousands of rounds that you cant/ wont use up within a couple years. I thought of taking those miniature Gatorade bottles or powerade bottles (20oz), stuffing 22lr in there, and taping off the cap. Then put them in my 50cal ammo cans. Supposedly you can fit 500-550 rounds in a 16 ounce bottle according to some forum posts ive came across. Seems less awkward to stash bottles of ammo rather than those vacuum sealed packages. Plus the bottles are reusable. Open, dump ammo out, put lid on, and tape shut. Done.

    AvatarTrapCyclone
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    Post count: 2552

    I have been using an ammo crate with a cheap desiccator thrown in. While I haven’t had it long enough to know how much of a difference it makes, it does have an o-ring seal around the lid and, if you so choose, you can put a padlock on it to help keep the kiddos, et al. out. I feel this is much better than what I had been doing previously which was basically just storing the ammo on a shelf in my garage. I figured the extreme hot and cold swings between summer and winter probably were not good for the longevity of the ammo. Here is an example of what I use:

    http://www.mtmcase-gard.com/mtm-ammo-crate.php

    Avatarisu22andy
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    Post count: 326

    πŸ˜† I had some mystery bird shot shells in the door of my hunting truck, all the writing was wore off, they were all rusted and corroded, been rained on , in and out of heat and cold for the last 7-8 years. I pulled them out this weekend, wiped em off, and shot three of them, all of them went bang and ejected.

    AvatarTeamAsgrow
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    Post count: 9151

    Quote by: isu22andy

    πŸ˜† I had some mystery bird shot shells in the door of my hunting truck, all the writing was wore off, they were all rusted and corroded, been rained on , in and out of heat and cold for the last 7-8 years. I pulled them out this weekend, wiped em off, and shot three of them, all of them went bang and ejected.

    I have some in a shell holder in my waders that are pretty crusty and they haven’t hiccuped yet…

    I think it is preppers wasting time and showing off to their chronies that they can store stuff and make sure it is ready for the zombie apocalypse…

    AvatarSR Dave
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    Post count: 170

    Quote by: isu22andy

    πŸ˜† I had some mystery bird shot shells in the door of my hunting truck, all the writing was wore off, they were all rusted and corroded, been rained on , in and out of heat and cold for the last 7-8 years. I pulled them out this weekend, wiped em off, and shot three of them, all of them went bang and ejected.

    If what you claim is accurate and true,,,,,,,,,,,, Then I am truly glad you are still here and able to post your story. As for myself, there won’t be any rusted and corroded shells going thru any of my guns.

    ECFirearmsECFirearms
    Participant
    Post count: 1346

    Quote by: Kev-Cat

    Was in a gun shop today and overheard a couple guys saying they store their ammo for the long-term by vacuum packing with a Food Saver. I hadn’t ever even thought of it. I’ve always just kept mine in a controlled temperature with as low of humidity as possible.

    The only reason I could think of that makes it sound okay to me is if it is sealed in a fairly dry location and then transported and/or stored in a wetter environment.

    I’ve only thought the variables to degrade ammo were temp and moisture.

    To me, vacuum sealing ammo would just reduce the amount of surrounding air but it sure wouldn’t lower the humidity more than where it was sealed. I’ve just watched on You-tube of people doing this too.

    Question: Why vacuum seal ammo? What am I missing?
    Thanks.
    Kev

    Take a look at the Sporting Arms and Ammunition Manufacturers’ Institute (SAAMI), it is an association of the nation’s leading manufacturers of firearms, ammunition and components.

    The SAAMI recommendations. http://saami.org/PDF/SAAMI_AmmoStorage.pdf

    IMHO Vac sealing is a bit over the top. Heat, cold, and moisture are going to be your biggest worries and Vac sealing solves one of these issues.

    β€œSecond Amendment – Either you are helping pull the wagon, getting a free ride in the wagon, or trying to take away the wagon. Which one are you?” -- IAShooters

    Avatarwalleyewilly
    Participant
    Post count: 196

    Quote by: isu22andy

    πŸ˜† I had some mystery bird shot shells in the door of my hunting truck, all the writing was wore off, they were all rusted and corroded, been rained on , in and out of heat and cold for the last 7-8 years. I pulled them out this weekend, wiped em off, and shot three of them, all of them went bang and ejected.

    I did this pheasant hunting a few years back with old corroded shells. The second of 3 was lodged in my barrel when I pulled the trigger a 3rd time. Halfway down my barrel split open like a banana peel. Not worth it

    AvatarKev-Cat
    Participant
    Post count: 1030

    Quote by: ECFirearms

    Quote by: Kev-Cat

    Was in a gun shop today and overheard a couple guys saying they store their ammo for the long-term by vacuum packing with a Food Saver. I hadn’t ever even thought of it. I’ve always just kept mine in a controlled temperature with as low of humidity as possible.

    The only reason I could think of that makes it sound okay to me is if it is sealed in a fairly dry location and then transported and/or stored in a wetter environment.

    I’ve only thought the variables to degrade ammo were temp and moisture.

    To me, vacuum sealing ammo would just reduce the amount of surrounding air but it sure wouldn’t lower the humidity more than where it was sealed. I’ve just watched on You-tube of people doing this too.

    Question: Why vacuum seal ammo? What am I missing?
    Thanks.
    Kev

    Take a look at the Sporting Arms and Ammunition Manufacturers’ Institute (SAAMI), it is an association of the nation’s leading manufacturers of firearms, ammunition and components.

    The SAAMI recommendations. http://saami.org/PDF/SAAMI_AmmoStorage.pdf

    IMHO Vac sealing is a bit over the top. Heat, cold, and moisture are going to be your biggest worries and Vac sealing solves one of these issues.

    Thanks for posting that link about the storage of ammo. Good read! I have also quit re-chambering the same loads over again since it was causing damage to the set of the bullets in the brass. Thank you.
    Kev

    Avatarmaxx
    Participant
    Post count: 2493

    Quote by: ECFirearms

    Quote by: Kev-Cat

    Was in a gun shop today and overheard a couple guys saying they store their ammo for the long-term by vacuum packing with a Food Saver. I hadn’t ever even thought of it. I’ve always just kept mine in a controlled temperature with as low of humidity as possible.

    The only reason I could think of that makes it sound okay to me is if it is sealed in a fairly dry location and then transported and/or stored in a wetter environment.

    I’ve only thought the variables to degrade ammo were temp and moisture.

    To me, vacuum sealing ammo would just reduce the amount of surrounding air but it sure wouldn’t lower the humidity more than where it was sealed. I’ve just watched on You-tube of people doing this too.

    Question: Why vacuum seal ammo? What am I missing?
    Thanks.
    Kev

    Take a look at the Sporting Arms and Ammunition Manufacturers’ Institute (SAAMI), it is an association of the nation’s leading manufacturers of firearms, ammunition and components.

    The SAAMI recommendations. http://saami.org/PDF/SAAMI_AmmoStorage.pdf

    IMHO Vac sealing is a bit over the top. Heat, cold, and moisture are going to be your biggest worries and Vac sealing solves one of these issues.

    Ya but it solves the hardest one to control, moisture. It is pretty easy to control temp in a house but most houses are not set up to control moisture. They do it somewhat naturally with AC but they are not control specifically for it.

    AvatarTeamAsgrow
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    Post count: 9151

    We are talking about ammo not an open bag of Doritos…

    Avatarmaxx
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    Post count: 2493

    I am not saying I do it. In my business I deal with AC and controlling Humidity so I was just making a point. Most people do not understand humidity at all.

    AvatarTeamAsgrow
    Participant
    Post count: 9151

    Quote by: maxx

    I am not saying I do it. In my business I deal with AC and controlling Humidity so I was just making a point. Most people do not understand humidity at all.

    I understand your point, but even in a house with normal humidity fluctuation, I wonder what the difference in shelf life would be from a factory box of shells vs. a vacuum packed box? Would most shooters have used that ammo before it got to the point of being ruined from a home’s normal humidity? Either way, I think that we are talking about a period of many years.

    ECFirearmsECFirearms
    Participant
    Post count: 1346

    Quote by: maxx

    Ya but it solves the hardest one to control, moisture. It is pretty easy to control temp in a house but most houses are not set up to control moisture. They do it somewhat naturally with AC but they are not control specifically for it.

    There are other less expensive and reusable options to help control moisture compared to buying a vacuum sealer. One of the better methods for extending the service life of your ammunition is to use ammo cans with a good seal and take a few new desiccant packets and place them in the ammo can. The great part about using silica gel desiccant packets is that they can be recycled and reused by simply putting them in an oven on a 150 F degree setting for a few hours. The ammo cans can be cleaned and reused repeatedly.

    β€œSecond Amendment – Either you are helping pull the wagon, getting a free ride in the wagon, or trying to take away the wagon. Which one are you?” -- IAShooters

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