Home Forums Hunting Firearms What to add to collection next

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  • Avatarrericsson
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    P/S. It is nice vault, locked and secure. robbie

    oldstylelightoldstylelight
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    Post count: 1943

    I would think dual purpose.

    1. A legal sized pistol for deer hunting, but a fun one to shoot.

    2. A legal deer rifle in Iowa like a 45/70 or a .44 mag. ( I just got a winchester .44 mag lever action marlin and love shooting it.)

    IaCraigIaCraig
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    Seems like a hypothetical cabin fever question. I think you need to take up ice fishing.

    Avatarjnrbronc
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    Or maybe pick up a custom smokeless built by Arrowhead Sporting Goods or some similar gunsmith. It will give you a gun for shotgun or ML deer seasons.

    AvatarIA 9249 AY
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    Quote by: cowboy

    Quote by: IA+9249+AY

    Quote by: TeamAsgrow

    Save for whatever you want, don’t buy a cheaper version because it is cheaper. If you want a clays gun, buy a good one not a stoeger. Buy something the grandkids will eventually love!

    This, buy once and cry once. Springfield Range Officer 1911 (or better) or Tikka T3 (or better) centerfire rifle. Both of those are kind of the bottom end for me. I wouldn’t shy away from a Savage centerfire as a work horse gun. Buy a quality over-under shotgun and never regret saving to get it.

    I have to agree with these guys. I am in a similar boat as you. Was going to get a cheaper full size hand gun, already have a carry gun, but decided to do it right. Looking at a Kimber 1911 CDP.

    Springfield has lifetime warranty and Kimber has 1 year, just saying.

    AvatarJPenny
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    What, no revolvers? I’d recommend a good Smith & Wesson wheelgun for your collection.

    Avatarkenhump
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    TAURUS TRACKER 627SS6, had one and should have never sold it.

    AvatarBacklash
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    Looks to me like you need a larger caliber rifle….308…6.5 creedmore or something along that line.

    I also agree a nice revolver like a Ruger Gp100 or Smith 686 would be a good addition as well.

    Avatarunitool
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    I appreciate and completely understand those who suggest I save up and spend more for quality. I enjoy shooting at the range a few times a month and hunt pheasant several times a year, but I just can’t bring myself to tie up a large portion of my net worth in guns. When I save up a couple grand to spare, I might be willing to spend $4-500 on a new toy that’ll sit in the cabinet 99% of the time. The rest is going into my ROTH IRA. Hence the modest nature of my existing accumulation.

    Can anybody explain to me why over/under shotguns as a whole are so darned expensive? There’s Stoeger and Stevens makes an entry level gun, but there’s more options $3k+ than there are $1000-1500. To me it seems they’re fairly simple machines compared to most other guns – why the premium?

    AvatarTrapCyclone
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    Quote by: unitool

    I appreciate and completely understand those who suggest I save up and spend more for quality. I enjoy shooting at the range a few times a month and hunt pheasant several times a year, but I just can’t bring myself to tie up a large portion of my net worth in guns. When I save up a couple grand to spare, I might be willing to spend $4-500 on a new toy that’ll sit in the cabinet 99% of the time. The rest is going into my ROTH IRA. Hence the modest nature of my existing accumulation.

    Can anybody explain to me why over/under shotguns as a whole are so darned expensive? There’s Stoeger and Stevens makes an entry level gun, but there’s more options $3k+ than there are $1000-1500. To me it seems they’re fairly simple machines compared to most other guns – why the premium?

    My own two cents is to get a 1911 pistol in 10 mm auto. This is useful for personal defense and hunting, just to name a few. There are quite a few manufacturers that have gotten into the game and offer a 10 mm auto version of their 1911 products. A couple that come to mind include Remington, Ruger, Dan Wesson, and then of course, there is the Colt Delta Elite.

    With regards to double barreled shotguns, if you look at the fit, finish, and operation of the low-end models versus the high-end models you will start to notice a fairly significant difference. The high end guns are built to last thousands, if not tens of thousands of rounds before needing any type of upkeep done. Some of the higher price may involve paying a bit for the brand, so it really is up to you to determine whether it is worth paying the higher price.

    llewellinsetterllewellinsetter
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    Double guns are more expensive for mostly two reasons…
    1) they have two barrels, two ignition actions, twice as many parts.
    2) the two barrels should be regulated, meaning the two barrels should have the same POI at roughly 40 yards.

    Sarcasm entails a few things: one of them is intellect, another one is a sense of humor, and a third - not taking things too personally.

    AvatarWoodtick89
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    Y do u need that many guns? Just talkin about that shooting, I only have guns for hunting. Y do people need 20 guns, AR’s & other stupid sht. Not a fan!

    Avatardeaddogwalkin
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    There is a simple reason why some people want or has that many guns. Because they are tools for the job that I want to do. And don’t let anyone tell you that ar’s can’t be used for hunting purposes. Because they are. They are not just the spray and pray. I use an ar to hunt with and do long range target shooting. I will explain it like I have to some of my friends. If you are putting baseboard trim on are you going to use a 2lb sledge hammer or are you going to use a finish hammer. I would use a finish hammer or my air nail. Can I use a 2lb sledge? Yep sure can. But not the best tool for the job. Or would you use a finish hammer to frame a house? Nope. I would pick a framing hammer. Could I use a finish hammer? yep sure could. But once again not the best tool. This is just a couple of examples but a tool is a tool and I will pick the right tool for the job. And guns and or ar-15’s are just tools that I use for a job. And it is the knuckle heads behind the tool that causes problems. Plus my firearms are my investments. That don’t depreciate as fast as other things.
    Sorry for the off topic but back to the OP’s ? I would save up for more of a quality firearm then just adding a firearm to the collection just to add one. They will hold their value more than buying an entry level gun just to increase your collection. Plus they will last a lifetime.

    AvatarTrapCyclone
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    Post count: 2552

    I generally agree with the notion of saving up to get a better quality firearm instead of purchasing a budget gun. However, sometimes you just want to get some skin into the game and for that a budget gun is ideal. Maybe you want a trap gun so you can give trap shooting a try, but the high dollar over and under shotguns cost $3,000 and up! The minimum to get into the game would be something like a Mossberg 500 or a Remington 870 pump action which can be had for a very good price. Or if you opt to start a bit higher you an look for a used Browning BT-99. I wouldn’t really recommend going straight out and buying something that is top-of-the-line without first determining if it is something that you will actually enjoy and really want to invest your time and money in. If you start with a Remington 870 or something similar and decide you like it then you can always upgrade at a later date. I am just saying that depending on your long term goal it isn’t always best to get the most expensive gun you can afford.

    AvatarLarry Richard
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    Post count: 449

    collections for the most part should be functional. that being said , the most functional things should be gotten and stand the test of time. You cannot go wrong with an 870, a model 70 or 700 if you are a Remington fan. A model 12 would be nice, even a mod 52 win or one of the neat browning 22 autos maybe a 10 22 or humpback browning a 101 win over under or even a superpose or citori. gosh this is getting to be a fun experiment. doc

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