Home Forums Miscellaneous Iowa Outdoors Cookbook — Recipes Wet Brine/Cure Ratio

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  • AvatarRutHunt
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    I’m wanting to use a wet brine on a pork loin to make canadian bacon on the smoker. I understand the process but I can’t find any consistency to the amount of pink salt #1 to use in the brine. While the dry cure looks pretty standard the wet brine amounts I’m seeing are all over the board. It’s not something I want to get wrong for sure. Has anyone does this and can share what ratio of pink salt #1 to 1 gallon of water I should be using? I expect I’ll have two 4-5 pound loin halves in the container at once when I start.

    AvatarTeamAsgrow
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    http://ruhlman.com/2011/02/canadian-bacon-brining-basics/

    This is the recipe that I have used in the past. After doing a little looking you are right it is all over the board for the amounts needed.

    Ruhlman’s recipes are usually pretty fail safe.

    AvatarTIMMY
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    This is where I started, my pink #1 ratio is still the same.
    real simple curing brine:

    for every 1 gallon of water, add:

    1/3 – 1 cup sea salt (depending if you’re on a lo-salt diet)
    1 cup granulated sugar or Splenda®
    1 cup brown sugar or Splenda® brown sugar mix
    1 tbsp cure no. 1 pink salt

    stir thoroughly until clear amber color, pour over meat, inject if necessary to cure from inside-out as well as outside-in

    weight down with a partially filled 1 qt or 1 gal. ziploc bag or bags to keep meat immersed

    Curing times vary with meat, but generally overnight to 2-3 days for chickens and turkeys, 8-10 days buckboard bacon, 10-14 days belly bacon, pork shoulder, whole butts, 3-4 weeks whole hams, 10-20 days corned beef (fresh beef roasts, briskets, rolled rib roasts, etc.) If whole muscle is more than 2″ thick, then inject so it can cure i/o as well as o/i, and/or in and around bone structures, etc.

    You can add any other flavorings you’d like, this is just the basic curing brine. 1 heaping tablespoon of cure is about 1 ounce. The maximum concentration allowed safely is 3.84 ounces per 1 gallon of brine (24 lbs.per 100 gallons: 16 oz. x 24 = 384 ounces, 1/100th is 3.84 ounces). You can experiment with different concentrations as long as you keep it between those parameters:

    Hope this helps

    AvatarTIMMY
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    Would also like to put up a disclaimer.

    PINK #1 IS NOT TABLE SALT !!!! If used in the wrong way it can make people sick. It is used for curing meat, not as a seasoning. Take the time, do some research before using it. Learning how to use curing salts will open up a whole new world of smoking meat. Good luck and enjoy !!!

    Avatarcoyoteman
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    Quote by: TIMMY

    This is where I started, my pink #1 ratio is still the same.
    real simple curing brine:

    for every 1 gallon of water, add:

    1/3 – 1 cup sea salt (depending if you’re on a lo-salt diet)
    1 cup granulated sugar or Splenda®
    1 cup brown sugar or Splenda® brown sugar mix
    1 tbsp cure no. 1 pink salt

    stir thoroughly until clear amber color, pour over meat, inject if necessary to cure from inside-out as well as outside-in

    weight down with a partially filled 1 qt or 1 gal. ziploc bag or bags to keep meat immersed

    Curing times vary with meat, but generally overnight to 2-3 days for chickens and turkeys, 8-10 days buckboard bacon, 10-14 days belly bacon, pork shoulder, whole butts, 3-4 weeks whole hams, 10-20 days corned beef (fresh beef roasts, briskets, rolled rib roasts, etc.) If whole muscle is more than 2″ thick, then inject so it can cure i/o as well as o/i, and/or in and around bone structures, etc.

    You can add any other flavorings you’d like, this is just the basic curing brine. 1 heaping tablespoon of cure is about 1 ounce. The maximum concentration allowed safely is 3.84 ounces per 1 gallon of brine (24 lbs.per 100 gallons: 16 oz. x 24 = 384 ounces, 1/100th is 3.84 ounces). You can experiment with different concentrations as long as you keep it between those parameters:

    Hope this helps

    Exactly what I use when making my bacon. 1 TBS per gallon is what I use for whatever I am curing.

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