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  • AvatarWallyman
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    Post count: 887

    I’ve handled these knives. They’re expensive, but good. I honestly didn’t buy one. I just got a Buck 105. It’s my favorite utility knife. But if you want the best, Emerson is it.
    http://emersonknives.com/knives/

    Avatarrevup
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    Post count: 1112

    Here ya go.
    Under $100 and has held up to some major testing by youtubers.

    https://www.amazon.com/Gerber-Survival-Knife-Coyote-22-41400/dp/B000G0HP5C

    also ESEE makes really nice ones that can be found for less than $100

    Avatarscherrman
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    Post count: 366

    Quote by: revup

    Here ya go.
    Under $100 and has held up to some major testing by youtubers.

    https://www.amazon.com/Gerber-Survival-Knife-Coyote-22-41400/dp/B000G0HP5C

    also ESEE makes really nice ones that can be found for less than $100

    That Gerber knife is pretty nice. Back when I was looking for a knife it came down to the Gerber LMF II and the Becker Ka-Bar BK2. I went with the Ka Bar which was only $69 on Amazon at the time.

    AvatarCRIA1576
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    Post count: 582

    Most of Gerber’s knives, multi-tools, etc… are made in China.

    All Gerber products are designed and engineered in Portland, OR where many are produced. We also tap our global supply chain to create a wide range of activity specific gear for wide variety of consumers.

    In my opinion, there are too many good knife makers that design, source, and assemble their blades in the USA at reasonable prices to go with a Gerber, CRKT, or other Chinese backed company.

    Buck and Benchmade are two very good knife makers that have brought all knife production back to the USA. Both have very affordable and high quality blades for the average sportsman. I really like the makeup and look of this Benchmade model with CPMS30V steel.
    http://www.benchmade.com/saddle-mountain-skinner-family.html

    AvatarMaverick
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    Post count: 4709

    Quote by: CRIA1576

    Most of Gerber’s knives, multi-tools, etc… are made in China.

    All Gerber products are designed and engineered in Portland, OR where many are produced. We also tap our global supply chain to create a wide range of activity specific gear for wide variety of consumers.

    In my opinion, there are too many good knife makers that design, source, and assemble their blades in the USA at reasonable prices to go with a Gerber, CRKT, or other Chinese backed company.

    Buck and Benchmade are two very good knife makers that have brought all knife production back to the USA. Both have very affordable and high quality blades for the average sportsman. I really like the makeup and look of this Benchmade model with CPMS30V steel.
    http://www.benchmade.com/saddle-mountain-skinner-family.html

    Yup. Pre 90’s Gerbers were fantastic blades made here. They sold and then sold again, and they have decided to let their quality slip and moved production to China so they can mass produce for places like Wal-Mart and other chain outdoor stores. They put out some OK stuff from time to time, but if you get a chance to handle a vintage made in America Gerber next to a Chinese produced one you’ll see what I am talking about.

    Avatarwader
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    Post count: 265

    Wow….. I appreciate all the responses and input. I’ll be researching all of these suggestions tonight.

    Wader

    Avatarkenhump
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    Post count: 12770

    Quote by: wader

    I have a number of folding knives but no fixed blade. I have no real use for one, but I’m looking at getting a good all around survival knife just to have. Any suggestions? I’ve looked at the buck 119,120 and 124. Probably not a true survival knife, but leaning toward the 119. Anyone have another suggestion?

    Wader

    I carried a 119 many moons. Great knife. Not easy to sharpen. Holds an edge well tho. 420 steel resists rust and stains.

    AvatarCRIA1576
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    Post count: 582

    From the bladeHQ glossary:

    420 (Steel) –
    has about .38% carbon. The low carbon content means that this steel is very soft, and doesn’t hold an edge well. It is low quality, low cost material. Many cheap knives tend to be made of this material because of its cost. Blades made from this material need to be sharpened frequently, and often chip. On the bright side, all 420 stainless steel is extremely rust resistant. This means that one of the best uses for this material is to make diving knives because of their constant contact with sal*censored*er. Sometimes, you will also see 420J. 420J is the lowest quality 420 steel, but is also the most rust resistant.

    420HC (Steel) –
    is used extensively in Buck knives. It has decent performance for comparative cost and has a higher Carbon content than other 420 steels. Contains: 0.46% Carbon; 0.3% Vanadium; 13% Chromium; 0.4% Manganese; 0.4% Silicon.

    If you want to go with Buck brand, they are now selling a wide variety of knives for less than $100 in S30V which is a far superior steel to 420.
    http://www.bladehq.com/cat–Knives–1623#filter:brand:Buck/filter:blade_material:CPM-S30V

    Avatarkenhump
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    Post count: 12770

    I believe the 119 I had was 420hc. I thought it held an edge great.

    AvatarCRIA1576
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    Post count: 582

    Ken- My Dad swore by his black handled 105 purchased back in the 80s, and he took it on many deer and antelope hunts. It is still in the family, and it does hold a good edge with the 420HC. Similar to Mora, Buck’s heat treat and hardening processes contribute to much better than average stainless steel performance.

    That all being said, there are substantially better steels available these days that hold a better edge longer for less than $100. The S30V Bucks are going to outperform the entry model 420HC blades all things being equal.

    As a side note, because the CPM SxxV steels are so hard, I checked with Work Sharp today to see if my power belt sharpener can hone this steel. The tech. that responded back said that the belts will indeed sharpen them, although it may take a little longer on the coarsest grit to get a good bur started.

    Avatarnahdogg
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    Post count: 212

    I dig my morakniv 15$ and shaving sharp out of the box from amazon.

    Avatarcuda
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    Post count: 555

    Any good heavy blade knife and a big plus would be a sharpening stone and ferrous rod too. And know how to use them too. A small knife is good but makes it hard to cut fire wood. Where a big knife will do a lot more work and cutting than a small knife. And a small thin knife will break easier than a big heavy blade. The shape of the knife can make a big difference on what you can use them for. A serrated blade is really hard to chop with and really hard to filet a fish too. So think about how much you can do with just one type of knife. Because you will need to depend on it a lot and it can save your life and others too. If you can not find the right knife for you there are a few people out there that make knives. And can make just what you want. And some can cut threw a steel rod and not chip or get dull. So shop around to find that one knife that fits you just right!

    AvatarBrad Phillips
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    Post count: 3187

    Quote by: cuda

    So shop around to find that one knife that fits you just right!

    I already own a small pile of “just right” 😀 Not complaining at all, just stating facts… I guess I am more of a “knife for a certain purpose type”

    Avatarnorthwoodsbucks
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    Post count: 1519

    ESEE, either the 4 or 6 inch (5 has to thick a blade for my taste).

    AvatarTrapCyclone
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    Post count: 2552

    When I think of a survival knife, the first thing that comes to mind is the knife used by Sylvester Stallone when he played Rambo in the “First Blood” movies! Now that was a kick-ass knife! It basically was a bowie knife with a hollowed out handle with a compass screw cap. It even looks like there are still some replicas for sale out there!

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