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  • Avatarwader
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    Post count: 265

    I have a number of folding knives but no fixed blade. I have no real use for one, but I’m looking at getting a good all around survival knife just to have. Any suggestions? I’ve looked at the buck 119,120 and 124. Probably not a true survival knife, but leaning toward the 119. Anyone have another suggestion?

    Wader

    AvatarBrad Phillips
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    Post count: 3187

    High carbon type blades can be struck with a flint (on the spine) to make sparks if needed. Google bushcraft knife. Lots of options out there, and some can be had pretty cheap. Mora would be an example of a cheap, but handy knife to mess around with.

    I do have a 119, nice knife and has been used to gut plenty of deer. I have been using a Puma that is a little smaller and easier to carry.

    Avatartracyiowa53
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    Post count: 444

    The best survival knife is the one you have with you when you need it.

    Avatarwader
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    Post count: 265

    Thanks for the replies, guys. Good tip on the high carbon. I’ll google bushcraft knife and see what I come up with.

    Wader

    AvatarMaverick
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    Post count: 4709

    Check out Bark River Knife and Tool or Fallkniven. They make some quality hunting/bushcraft/survival knives. They have some high carbon steels available too.

    Avatarfirepoggy
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    Post count: 129

    Ka-bar is another option

    AvatarPaulB
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    Post count: 1047

    I highly recommend Mora Knives. they come in several styles of steel and are very inexpensive. I have several in vehicles and other odd spots as the best knife is the one you have with you.

    Avatarcody
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    Post count: 384

    becker bk16. i have 2 of them. best bang for the $$$ for a production knife.

    Avatarscherrman
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    Post count: 366

    I did a lot of research on survival knives a few years ago and went with the Ka-Bar BK-22. I thought it was the best knife for the money at the time. It’s pretty heavy duty and can to a lot of different things.
    https://www.amazon.com/KA-BAR-Companion-Polyester-Pocket-Sheath/dp/B00BT49UVG/ref=pd_lpo_200_bs_t_2?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=2RR95X9RYBN3KQGHT012

    AvatarPaulB
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    Post count: 1047

    https://www.amazon.com/Morakniv-Companion-Outdoor-Military-4-1-Inch/dp/B004TNWD40/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1484759095&sr=8-1&keywords=mora+knives

    these are very good. full tang and you can find videos of them being used to split wood. I have used them for several season a deer butchering and the respond well to almost any method of sharpening and hold an edge for a really long time.

    AvatarDILLIGAF
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    Post count: 219

    Columbia River Knife and Tool (CRKT), Cold Steel, and Benchmade all make good knives that would suit your purposes. CRKT has some interesting serrations on some of their knife models. I can’t remember what they’re called. Veff serrations maybe?

    AvatarTeamAsgrow
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    Post count: 9152

    Randall model 18 knife, good quality blade you can pass to your great grandchildren.

    AvatarBrad Phillips
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    Post count: 3187

    Rambo or Cody Lundin ???? I guess that would be a good direction to start.

    AvatarBrad Phillips
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    Post count: 3187

    Quote by: PaulB

    https://www.amazon.com/Morakniv-Companion-Outdoor-Military-4-1-Inch/dp/B004TNWD40/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1484759095&sr=8-1&keywords=mora+knives

    these are very good. full tang and you can find videos of them being used to split wood. I have used them for several season a deer butchering and the respond well to almost any method of sharpening and hold an edge for a really long time.

    Batoning ??? Might as well have a hachet or kukri machete B)

    AvatarCRIA1576
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    Post count: 582

    I’ve been researching the different types of steel and cross matching to the better knives available for the last couple years. What I’ve learned, and the reason why I haven’t pulled the trigger yet, is because there is way more to it than just aesthetics. You need to determine the characteristics of the steel you want first and go from there on your search.

    If you are looking for a good all around bushcraft knife that can also serve as a hunting and camp knife, you may indeed want to go with one with a high carbon blade. A very popular high carbon steel is 1095HC with rockwell hardness of 58-60. If you run out of matches or just like to go traditional when starting fires, a high carbon blade can be used on a ferro rod to throw sparks. A quality 1095 high carbon blade is also very easy to sharpen and will have very good edge retention. The only real downfall to these types of blades is that they will rust if not treated with a coating or maintained regularly with some oil. TOPS knives sells 1095 blades exclusively and are 100% made in the USA. They have every style of blade you can imagine, and run anywhere from $120-200+ depending on size/intended use.
    https://www.topsknives.com/

    If you are looking for a high quality blade that has extremely high corrosion resistance, but isn’t stainless, you may want to go with one with D2 tool steel. These blades have arguably the best balance in strength, edge retention, and corrosion resistance, for a reasonable price. CFK cutlery has a large selection of knives in this category with D2 steel blades, and most can be had for less than $100.
    http://www.customforgedknives.com/

    The Morakniv brand is extremely well known, and they offer very functional and popular knives for less than $50. To another poster’s point, you can buy several of these and throw them in your pickup, tackle box, backpack, etc…, and have an aresenal of very good and serviceable blades. Although Mora knives are almost exclusively made from stainless steel, the heat treat and hardening process used by Mora effectively nullifies many of the problems associated with other cheap 440 series stainless knives.
    https://morakniv.se/en/produktkategori/jaktknivar-en/

    If money isn’t an issue, there are even better blade steels available including your CPM SXXV series. These are your S30V, S60V, S90V, etc… This material is becoming more popular because of high strength, ability to resist rust, and how well it holds an edge. However, they are extremely difficult to sharpen, if you ever needed to do so. They are incredibly wear resistant, but may require professional sharpening.

    I have spent a lot of time at bladeHQ looking through their glossary when a new knife catches my eye. Below is a link to the glossary and different types of steel with their pros and cons. Hopefully this will make your knife comparison a little more convenient.
    http://www.bladehq.com/cat–Knife-Glossary–389

    Personally, I have been taking a hard look at the following:
    https://www.topsknives.com/tex-creek
    https://www.topsknives.com/fieldcraft-by-brothers-of-bushcraft
    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01H606V3G/ref=wl_it_dp_o_pC_S_ttl?_encoding=UTF8&colid=1J4T84NJ6OV7L&coliid=IA5U8SGVRIVFK
    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01MS7WW6Z/ref=wl_it_dp_o_pC_S_ttl?_encoding=UTF8&colid=1J4T84NJ6OV7L&coliid=I1OBZ26XLBY4B

    Have fun looking for the right blade and good luck!

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