Scent Crusher2016-10-05T03:06:14-05:00

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  • BigDud1983BigDud1983
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    Post count: 916

    So I am a scent freak and broke down and bought the closet. Just wanted anyones opinion on here who’ve used it your thoughts. I try not to buy into gimmicks and did months of reaearch and watched videos before bitin the bullet. Its running now as I type this. What are your thoughts if you own one. I know some of you may not believe in this stuff just wanted first hand experience from you guys. In hindsight I probably should’ve asked here before buying but for some reason never crossed my mind until rite now.

    Thanks guys for any feedback.

    Good luck to all who head out Saturday and be safe.

    Dustin

    AvatarDGorman
    Participant
    Post count: 1851

    I bought an ozone go at the deer classic and I’ve been really impressed with it. I’ll most likely never have an ozone generator in the tree with me, but I’m pretty well convinced pre treating your gear is a great idea. At some point I’ll probably end up with the bag or the closet, just not in the budget this year.

    Avataraaronm
    Participant
    Post count: 339

    not trying to start an argument because I am a believer in using whatever you thing works, however personally I don’t purchase stuff like this because there is not factual data that says it really works. how can you truly say this stuff works? a deer didn’t smell you down wind, that has never happened before? I have deer all the time down wind from me that carry on about there business. again not trying to stir the pot, just giving my two cents. purchase and use if you believe but I am the old fuddy duddy that says hunt the wind.

    Avatarrevup
    Participant
    Post count: 1112

    FYI – Too much exposure will breakdown rubber.
    Other than that, I know hog farmers that use it to get the stink out of their trucks and clothes.
    It works, but it does seem to leave a chemical type of smell behind…… that smell tends to dissipate after a while, after removing your clothes from treatment.

    AvatarDGorman
    Participant
    Post count: 1851

    Quote by: aaronm

    not trying to start an argument because I am a believer in using whatever you thing works, however personally I don’t purchase stuff like this because there is not factual data that says it really works. how can you truly say this stuff works? a deer didn’t smell you down wind, that has never happened before? I have deer all the time down wind from me that carry on about there business. again not trying to stir the pot, just giving my two cents. purchase and use if you believe but I am the old fuddy duddy that says hunt the wind.

    The reason I’m sold on it is I went to cabelas a few weeks ago, and before I headed back I grabbed a couple burgers at Pete’s for the ride home. I set the greasy onion smelling boat they came in on the rear floor of my truck when I was done. I forgot to take it out when I got home, and didn’t drive my truck the next day. When I opened the door Monday morning my truck smelled like greasy onion b.o. it was terrible. When I got to work, I plugged the mini generator into the outlet and when I was done for the day you would never have known about the smell. Does it remove everything 100%? Of course not, nothing does, but I believe it is a valuable tool and can be a very helpful addition to your scent control regimen, which also includes playing the wind.

    AvatarKinley23
    Participant
    Post count: 112

    I had this conversation with a buddy of mine last night. He asked “does scent away work?” My response was…unless you store your gear in a scent controlled bag or area, wash down with scent control products, scent control your pickup or hunting vehicle, and spray down in field. Then no. Even then it might not work 100%. The time and money spent on these scent products can be made up by walking 15 extra minutes to a spot with good wind. With that being said, the area I hunt does not have straight line winds coming through. Maybe if I used scent control, swirling wind wouldn’t be a problem for me. I would rather spend the extra money on warmer layers or another hang on before buying some scent control.

    AvatarLundImpact1675
    Participant
    Post count: 260

    While I don’t disagree that some of these tools work in a vacuum re: while clothes are in the closet, in the scent bag, sealed in plastic, etc…, IME we can’t eliminate our smell 100% and disregard wind direction when deciding where to hunt.

    I tried military surplus carbon suits years ago with mixed results, and I don’t believe the scent blocker/scent lok suits, ozonics, etc…, on the market today survive long past first contact in nature either, because the human body is constantly sloughing skin cells, producing mouth odors, excreting oils, etc… Residual odors in vehicles, dog/pent dander, vehicle exhaust, perspiration, etc…, all may go unnoticed to our noses, but are certainly detectable by animals.

    To complicate matters, anybody that has ever sat around a campfire can attest that wind directions constantly change subtly and this is just as true while you are in the stand or on the ground. And let’s not forget that morning and evening thermals can also test the patience and resolve of many a seasoned hunter that thinks they are in an “ideal” location.

    Can these products potentially give you an extra split second to draw and shoot before getting busted? Maybe, in some examples, but I don’t think this is a guarantee, and I certainly don’t think they should EVER replace good woodsmanship or influence the decision to hunt a set with a mediocre wind. Now if my career as a paid professional hunter depended on successfully harvesting deer on video, and the products were given to me or significantly marked down, I would absolutely use them. However, for most of us I don’t think there is much ROI on these products.

    After 20 years of bowhunting, my tips for success include the following-
    1. Wash your clothes in either brand name unscented “all natural” detergents or with the cheapest “deer” soaps on the market.
    2. Dry the clothes without fabric softener or use one of those fresh earth dryer sheets.
    3. Pack the 100% dry clothes in a tote with a tight lid or a very large storage zip bag.
    4. Put your outer layers on outside your pickup after the truck is turned off.
    5. Always try to keep the wind in your face, rub some mud or manure on your boots, crush some evergreen boughs or berries on your clothes, and sit very still in your tree or blind.
    6. Use your full range of eyesight to detect movement before moving your head or turning your shoulders.
    7. When a deer comes in, don’t forget to breathe and do not make eye contact.
    8. Finally, if you can see a deer’s eyeball from any angle, it can see you, so don’t move. Their eyes are built to detect movement, and their ears can rotate almost 360 degrees. You are far more likely to spook a deer by moving or making noise before they smell you, and you must be patient and wait for the right moment to draw.

    Good luck to all the hunters getting out this weekend!

    Joe

    AvatarTrapCyclone
    Participant
    Post count: 2552

    Quote by: LundImpact1675

    While I don’t disagree that some of these tools work in a vacuum re: while clothes are in the closet, in the scent bag, sealed in plastic, etc…, IME we can’t eliminate our smell 100% and disregard wind direction when deciding where to hunt.

    I tried military surplus carbon suits years ago with mixed results, and I don’t believe the scent blocker/scent lok suits, ozonics, etc…, on the market today survive long past first contact in nature either, because the human body is constantly sloughing skin cells, producing mouth odors, excreting oils, etc… Residual odors in vehicles, dog/pent dander, vehicle exhaust, perspiration, etc…, all may go unnoticed to our noses, but are certainly detectable by animals.

    To complicate matters, anybody that has ever sat around a campfire can attest that wind directions constantly change subtly and this is just as true while you are in the stand or on the ground. And let’s not forget that morning and evening thermals can also test the patience and resolve of many a seasoned hunter that thinks they are in an “ideal” location.

    Can these products potentially give you an extra split second to draw and shoot before getting busted? Maybe, in some examples, but I don’t think this is a guarantee, and I certainly don’t think they should EVER replace good woodsmanship or influence the decision to hunt a set with a mediocre wind. Now if my career as a paid professional hunter depended on successfully harvesting deer on video, and the products were given to me or significantly marked down, I would absolutely use them. However, for most of us I don’t think there is much ROI on these products.

    After 20 years of bowhunting, my tips for success include the following-
    1. Wash your clothes in either brand name unscented “all natural” detergents or with the cheapest “deer” soaps on the market.
    2. Dry the clothes without fabric softener or use one of those fresh earth dryer sheets.
    3. Pack the 100% dry clothes in a tote with a tight lid or a very large storage zip bag.
    4. Put your outer layers on outside your pickup after the truck is turned off.
    5. Always try to keep the wind in your face, rub some mud or manure on your boots, crush some evergreen boughs or berries on your clothes, and sit very still in your tree or blind.
    6. Use your full range of eyesight to detect movement before moving your head or turning your shoulders.
    7. When a deer comes in, don’t forget to breathe and do not make eye contact.
    8. Finally, if you can see a deer’s eyeball from any angle, it can see you, so don’t move. Their eyes are built to detect movement, and their ears can rotate almost 360 degrees. You are far more likely to spook a deer by moving or making noise before they smell you, and you must be patient and wait for the right moment to draw.

    Good luck to all the hunters getting out this weekend!

    Joe

    I have to agree with just about everything you stated except perhaps point #8. I also use the low-cost scent control stuff such as scent-free detergent, soap, deodrant, and the scent-control spray as they are relatively low cost items that I feel (hope) that these at least prevent me from smelling like a rotten egg to the deer. As for the more expensive items, in my opinion the cost likely outweighs the benefits that you attain. I would rather spend my money on new tree stands and put up more than one so that I can sit in whichever stand is best situated with respect to the direction the wind is blowing that day. That said, if I had money to burn or were offered these products for free I would certainly give them a try as it doesn’t hurt to use anything and everything that will legally help you defeat a deer’s defenses.

    With respect to deer sensing movement in #8 above, while I agree that they are very adept at picking out movement, I do believe that their upwards vision is somewhat limited. I don’t recall the specifics, but I think that while horizontally scanning their environment their vision is limited to approximately 8-10 feet off the ground. Note this is just from side-to-side head movements and without moving their head to look upwards. I can try to find the source if you are really interested in finding out more about this issue.

    AvatarLundImpact1675
    Participant
    Post count: 260

    With respect to deer sensing movement in #8 above, while I agree that they are very adept at picking out movement, I do believe that their upwards vision is somewhat limited. I don’t recall the specifics, but I think that while horizontally scanning their environment their vision is limited to approximately 8-10 feet off the ground. Note this is just from side-to-side head movements and without moving their head to look upwards. I can try to find the source if you are really interested in finding out more about this issue.

    I don’t necessarily disagree, but you have to be cognizant of where you are in relation to the deer’s horizon. If you are downhill from a deer that is approaching, they have a much better FOV. If they are downhill or you are in a very high stand, I would agree the risk is mitigated somewhat. However, you have to remember that as a prey animal, their eyes are located more towards the side of their head for a reason.

    I also truly believe that deer in pressured areas, especially old nanny does, that have spotted hunters in tree stands learn to look up. They may not spook every time, but IME they do begin altering their travel routes to give that suspicious, smelly, blob up in the tree a wider birth. 😆

    AvatarTrapCyclone
    Participant
    Post count: 2552

    Quote by: LundImpact1675

    With respect to deer sensing movement in #8 above, while I agree that they are very adept at picking out movement, I do believe that their upwards vision is somewhat limited. I don’t recall the specifics, but I think that while horizontally scanning their environment their vision is limited to approximately 8-10 feet off the ground. Note this is just from side-to-side head movements and without moving their head to look upwards. I can try to find the source if you are really interested in finding out more about this issue.

    I don’t necessarily disagree, but you have to be cognizant of where you are in relation to the deer’s horizon. If you are downhill from a deer that is approaching, they have a much better FOV. If they are downhill or you are in a very high stand, I would agree the risk is mitigated somewhat. However, you have to remember that as a prey animal, their eyes are located more towards the side of their head for a reason.

    I also truly believe that deer in pressured areas, especially old nanny does, that have spotted hunters in tree stands learn to look up. They may not spook every time, but IME they do begin altering their travel routes to give that suspicious, smelly, blob up in the tree a wider birth. 😆

    I definitely agree with you here. If the landscape is perfectly horizontal then the deer will more than likely be looking generally horizontal in their plane of view. One of my tree stands has a little dip in the landscape in front of it, so if deer are coming toward me on the downward side of that dip they tend to be looking down and they will be less likely to see me. However, if they are coming towards me on the upwards side and tend to be looking upwards then I have to be much more cautious.

    Even if you can see a deer’s eyes when they approach don’t you still have to make some movement in order to get in position to get a shot off or even just to pull your bowstring back? Like if you spot some deer slowly ambling toward your position and there is no one instance where all or most of them have their view of you blocked then how are you going to get in position for the shot if you don’t move? I assume slow and smooth movements would be key?

    AvatarLundImpact1675
    Participant
    Post count: 260

    If its just one or a few deer, usually you can time your draw when they are looking away or head’s are down, assuming they’re not on high alert. You get many more than a few and it becomes super dicey for sure. That’s one of those situations where you have to draw as early as possible and embrace the suck/strain until they reach shooting range. Or, if you don’t plan to shoot, sit very still and let them pass.

    I have been fortunate a couple times to rattle nice bucks up from river bottoms where I had a good FOV of them coming. These deer came in on a string, heads up and alert and ready to fight. I had to draw very early to ensure that when they got in range all I had to do was settle and squeeze the trigger.

    In general, any time I draw the bow I try to be very deliberate, slow, and steady. Sudden or jerky movements put you at increased risk, and I always cringe when I see guys draw too many pound with that big wind up (tilting bow up and then down). I practice drawing as level as possible from knees, seated, and standing to minimize any unecessary movement. That way when you are in the tree muscle memory takes over.

    AvatarTrapCyclone
    Participant
    Post count: 2552

    Quote by: LundImpact1675

    If its just one or a few deer, usually you can time your draw when they are looking away or head’s are down, assuming they’re not on high alert. You get many more than a few and it becomes super dicey for sure. That’s one of those situations where you have to draw as early as possible and embrace the suck/strain until they reach shooting range. Or, if you don’t plan to shoot, sit very still and let them pass.

    I have been fortunate a couple times to rattle nice bucks up from river bottoms where I had a good FOV of them coming. These deer came in on a string, heads up and alert and ready to fight. I had to draw very early to ensure that when they got in range all I had to do was settle and squeeze the trigger.

    In general, any time I draw the bow I try to be very deliberate, slow, and steady. Sudden or jerky movements put you at increased risk, and I always cringe when I see guys draw too many pound with that big wind up (tilting bow up and then down). I practice drawing as level as possible from knees, seated, and standing to minimize any unecessary movement. That way when you are in the tree muscle memory takes over.

    Good advice here. I actually drew down the poundage on my bow for the above reasons. I found I was making too much movement and had to strain really hard to hold it for extended periods if the draw weight on my bow is maxed out. I don’t have quite as much experience as you do, but I’ve quickly learned that I need to get in position and be ready to draw or already have my bow drawn if I see any movement in the distance that resembles a deer. Otherwise there is a higher probability of getting busted if I try to stand up or move in order to make a shot after the deer is already in a position where they could potentially see me.

    Avatarbeetyal
    Participant
    Post count: 219

    I have the ozone go and the gear bag. I haven’t hunted since I’ve had them but so far, I like what they do. The odor that is left after is a smell that occurs naturally in the outdoors, it’s just stronger than what we are used to smelling. Supposedly it won’t spook deer. Again, I can’t say one way or another yet. I can say that I’ve begun smelling that ozone smell outside since I’ve gotten used to what it is.
    The main thing I have seen or read that has me convinced that ozone works is this article from field and stream. http://www.fieldandstream.com/articles/hunting/2014/07/does-it-work-ozone-scent-control-vs-drug-sniffing-dog
    I personally don’t plan to ever use an ozonics unit. I don’t want another thing to carry out there and I can’t believe that it is healthy having ozone basically flooding down on top of you. The scent crusher stuff won’t be running with anybody breathing the direct ozone output so I’m not concerned about it.

    AvatarLundImpact1675
    Participant
    Post count: 260

    Right on brother and that is exactly the right mindset. Native Americans killed millions of deer and bigger game with stick bows shooting 40 pounds or less and chiseled arrowheads. A guy doesn’t need to shoot 70 pounds to consistently kill whitetails at moderate ranges, especially with the phenomenal broadheads available today. It is always better to draw, let it walk, and let down your string than miss the opportunity completely or blow a nice buck out of the area by drawing at the wrong moment. I know there are a lot of guys that use decoys to distract bucks’ attention and increase the odds in their favor. I’ve never had much success personally, but it is definitely worth a try if you’ve never done it.

    Knowing when to draw is one of those things that comes after having a lot of deer under your stand, and you can pick up some good queues from some of the more reputable hunting videos too. Personally, I really liked the Drury videos from about 10 years ago before they got so uber professional.

    Avatarmhock
    Participant
    Post count: 3353

    I personally don’t think it’s worth the $. I do not own one obviously. I agree with Lund with what he said about TV hunters. They have nothing to lose by pimping these items and everything to gain. That’s why we are bombarded with all the broadheads, bows, calls, clothing, cameras, bait, (I mean food plots), etc. Those units that hang above you are not cheap at all. Do they work? I guess I don’t really care personally. I have been deer hunting for 28 years and have always had deer meat in the freezer without spending money on one of these or any scent control of any kind. All this being said, hunt as you wish and use all the products and tactics you feel give you confidence, you want. I would encourage all hunters to do the same. If you aren’t confident in the stand, it’s no fun. Good Luck!

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