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  • Avatarfishnmylifeaway
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    Post count: 171

    OK so ive been made aware that taking pictures on railways is illegal. In iowa is there a set distance from the tracks that is the easement? or does it depend on the track company? Ive tried searching a little on it but can seem to find a “set” answer. I figured id better find out for sure before i go out and get in trouble!

    Avatardkwolf
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    Post count: 3697

    Unfortunately, it’s not consistent, even among a single rail line. Ask any surveyor, and one of the things they hate the most is having to work up next to the railroad. Legal descriptions filed by the railroads were poorly written and often difficult to interpret.

    The best bet is look around you – look for a fence, or definitive change in the land use. (They won’t allow a farmer to farm inside of their right-of-way, etc.) Barring that, if you kept 50′ or so from the centerline of the rail, I would think you would be okay. Keep in mind that the RR right-of-way crosses the road right-of-way as well – ask the people of Manson about that. Couple years ago the RR police (yes, the railroad is the only private entity in the US with it’s own fully legal police force) sat in town, and wrote seat belt violation tickets to anyone that drove across the railroad crossing that wasn’t buckled up.

    Avatargrizzwald660
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    Post count: 592

    Yeah the railroad cops are no one to make mad 😡. They’re all business!

    Avatarstevenoak
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    Post count: 1172

    I have owned half a dozen properties that boarded rail. 50′ from center is pretty standard. But have seen long lost easements for expansion. 50 years ago when I was a kid we use to hunt rr tracks all the time. Great for quail and rabbits. Great thing if you miss, they just kept moving ahead of you. Seem like the 70’s was when it became a big deal. Think liability was the biggest issue.

    Avatarhuntingirl
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    Post count: 4040

    Rule of thumb for photographers is 50ft from center; you can typically see a clear definition of what is considered the no go line by the way the ground is being used. If you plan on photographing on a railroad despite the dangers do not publish it for the public to view. Railroad companies will press charges if they can determine where you took the photo.

    Avatardkwolf
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    Post count: 3697

    Quote by: huntingirl

    Rule of thumb for photographers is 50ft from center; you can typically see a clear definition of what is considered the no go line by the way the ground is being used. If you plan on photographing on a railroad despite the dangers do not publish it for the public to view. Railroad companies will press charges if they can determine where you took the photo.

    Ressurrecting an old thread, but huntingirl is exactly right. When my job puts me alongside a railroad, if I’m taking photos of anything, I will purposely include something in the photo that removes all doubt that I’m standing outside of the railroad ROW.

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