Home Forums Miscellaneous General Banter Panasonic Drills

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  • nater3nater3
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    Post count: 2038

    My 12V Makita batteries have quit holding a lengthy charge so I am looking to buy a new drill. The cost of new batteries is way too much on my current drill. In all of my research, the Panasonic 15.6V drill keeps coming up as the best drill for the money. I am having a hard time buying a Panasonic drill as I have never really heard about them. Does anyone own one of these or have any experience with them?

    Avatarbock
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    Post count: 53

    The company I work for bought some 18 volt ones a few years back and the ones they bought burned up within 3 months. The gears on the one I had actually started smoking. In my opinion there not worth the money. My Dad bought the new Makitia 18 volt lithuim ion combo at Menards awhile back, not a bad combo for the money for around the house use.

    Travis

    Avatarshaley
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    Post count: 2568

    We use the Panasonics at work, I’m honestly quite impressed by them. I personaly own Makita and De walt cordless drills and no problems there either. If you just need a little something for home use the little 10 volt Bosh are neat little units to but require 1/4 hex drill bits.

    Avatarbock
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    Post count: 53

    Shaley what do you do? We used them a lot for drilling into steel, and drilling holes using hole saws into pipe. Its a lot of abuse on any cordless drill but if they dont want to spend the extra money and buy a corded drill for the job thats there problem, we will just keep buring them up.

    Avatarshaley
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    Post count: 2568

    Carpenter, I can see where you’ll burn up any cordless abusing them that way. A good corded 1/2″ drill is cheaper anyway but can only use what your given. The only downfall of the Panisonics are their weight, they are heavy.

    nater3nater3
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    Post count: 2038

    I definitely don’t want to spend more than $200 on my next drill. I have heard the new Dewalts aren’t near the quality of the old ones. I know that I want a 14v or larger this time around. I can get a dewalt for $200 but have the concerns about hearing their quality has declined since being bought by Black and Decker. What is a reasonable amount of years to expect drill batteries to last with only limited home use? I have had my drill for six years so I am not saying that I am completely surprised that my batteries don’t hold a very good charge anymore, but am just wondering.

    Avatarshaley
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    Post count: 2568

    The less you use them the less they last.

    nater3nater3
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    Post count: 2038

    Shaley,
    I am not doubting you in the least because I am clueless, but that doesn’t seem logical to a tool idiot like me. Why does a battery last longer if you use it more?

    AvatarTysonT
    Participant
    Post count: 6669

    Because they function better and have a longer life when fully discharged and recharged, such as in a construction or recreational builder environment; Rather than just being charged and let to slowly drain over time, then occasionally recharged. Like someone would do if they only did a few household repairs a year. There is probably some scientific reasoning behind it, but I just call it “the nature of the beast.”

    Avatarshaley
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    Post count: 2568

    Nii Cad need to be used to keep their charge longer, if you don’t use them their either laying in the box discharging or sitting in a charger cooking. They are designed to be cycled to get the best life out of them. Hope that made some sort of sence.

    Avatarkenhump
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    Post count: 12770

    Not all batteries are ment to be on a charger longer than a few hours, while others can be left on a charger 24/7.
    A battery can go dead on some of the smart chargers. What happens is when the battery is fully charged, the charging circut shuts down and will not restart until tha battery is unplugged then replugged. 😉

    Avatarjrocker
    Participant
    Post count: 1666

    The way I understand it Panasonic develops the batteries used by most cordless manufacturers. I cant personally speak for the quality of their tool, but the few people I know who have them have been satisfied. I use a Crafstman impact every day at work and I would recomend it to anyone. The amount of work I can do w/ one is before it wears out is pretty impressive for the price.

    Also I just hapenned to read the directions on the back of one of the batteries on fr. It said to completely drain the battery before the first charge. After that it should go on the charger at the first sign of diminished performance. After the battery is charged it should be removed from the charger immediately. Once a month it should be left on the charger overnite.

    nater3nater3
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    Post count: 2038

    Alright I will demonstrate my lack of knowledge. What is the difference between a driver/drill and an impact drill?

    Avatarjrocker
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    Post count: 1666

    A drill/driver issimply a drill. An impact is a driver only that works kinda like a pneumatic impact like mechanics use. The impact is hands down the most efficient way of running any sort of fastener. I can run a 3in. screw into a microlam and not even slow it down! IMO if you want the new cordless for drilling and screwing you need the drill. But if you are gonna use it primarily for fasteners the impact is the only way to go!

    Hope that helped.

    AvatarProbass
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    Post count: 208

    You may want to look at Ridgid brand at Home Depot. I have a 18 volt it is heavy but made like a tank. Also the batteries are replaced free for life as long as you keep your receipt. They run this special on the ridgid cordless equipment from time to time. Hope this helps.

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