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  • AvatarDshradel
    Participant
    Post count: 2

    Hey everyone,

    So a little intro I have fished my whole 27 years of life. But mainly it was worm and bobber, and sometimes a chartreuse grub and jig head. But more recently I decided I really wanted to get into bass fishing…. it’s been difficult. There is a lot that I am learning and I feel like I am starting to get it, but then every time I go out to fish I either catch nothing or get a couple of bites but lose the fish to possibly not setting the hook hard enough. What are some beginner tips and maybe some locals that are good to learn. I am in Johnson Co.

    Thanks ahead of time,
    Drew

    topH20terrortopH20terror
    Participant
    Post count: 1361

    Use spinnerbaits/buzzbaits, plastic worms, poppers, crankbaits close to shoreline cover (rocks, trees, brush, etc.) Plan on losing some lures and have fun.

    Fish ponds to increase your success.

    Bass fishing is my specialty. 😉

    medicdanomedicdano
    Participant
    Post count: 4987

    Watch bass fishing shows then go fishing!! Bill Dance and anything Kevin Van Dam does will be the most educational.

    Avatarscherrman
    Participant
    Post count: 366

    There are two lures I catch most of my bass on all year. The Red Eye Shad lipless crankbait and the Chatterbait. I like the orange craw color with the lipless crank but other colors work well too. Many colors work with the chatterbait as well but I have a lot of luck with black/blue and make sure you put some kind of trailer on it. My last two personal best bass were on the chatterbait.

    Spinners baits and plastic worms work very well also.

    Avatarkenhump
    Participant
    Post count: 12769

    I found this.
    “Thank you for using the Iowa DNR website. Unfortunately the Alabama Rig as it is with the five lures is not legal. According to the Fisheries Bureau you can remove three of the hooks and have the same principle of a line look like a school of fish to attract others. As long as a rig only has two hooks it would be legal. Clarification provided by Iowa Department of Natural Resources.”

    AvatarDshradel
    Participant
    Post count: 2

    Thanks for the advice. I’ve been mainly using plastic worms because it seemed like a good start. And from what I hear pretty reliable. My main lake is MacBride, but I am beginning to lose confidence in it…. is there a better place to get more practice with more bites? Not looking for a hog or anything like that, but at least somewhere I can get a little more consistent bites that will help me learn the feel and cadence that I need to fish with? I know a lot of people say ponds, but I always worry if they are fish-able ponds or not.

    Avataroaxaca
    Participant
    Post count: 294

    Try the Iowa River wherever there is riprap and some current. Below the dam, downstream at the train pillars, any place a bridge crosses over, etc. I like rebel crawdads and various creature baits (often mimicking crawdads) on a jig. Also, if there are any big feeder creeks or streams, they can hold some nice fish as well.

    Avatarspeng5
    Participant
    Post count: 2928

    Quote by: Dshradel

    Thanks for the advice. I’ve been mainly using plastic worms because it seemed like a good start. And from what I hear pretty reliable. My main lake is MacBride, but I am beginning to lose confidence in it…. is there a better place to get more practice with more bites? Not looking for a hog or anything like that, but at least somewhere I can get a little more consistent bites that will help me learn the feel and cadence that I need to fish with? I know a lot of people say ponds, but I always worry if they are fish-able ponds or not.

    Dshradel you have a PM, check your inbox on this site.

    AvatarIowaAnglers
    Participant
    Post count: 635

    I agree with topH20terror. Ponds will be much easier to start fishing. My go to bait at all times is the senko. It catches fish really easy. I usually make long casts around the shore and pick up the easy biters. Senko wacky rigged will guarantee you a fish. I recommend some braid. I would go with 20lb suffix 832 braid my favorite. The 20lb suffix 832 braid is thin in diameter. It is .009 in diameter which is equivalent to 6lb mono test which would allow you to make a smooth distant cast. You wouldnt have to worry about breaking off as much either. Favorite color for senkos. For clear water i use watermelon redflake and green pumpkin. If the water is a little murky, i always go with black and blue. With the weather being really warm, find some shade and make casts in the shade. I hope this helps. If you have any questions feel free to message me i can help you out.

    AvatarVScott
    Participant
    Post count: 48

    Everything that has been mentioned is good advice. However one thing that hasn’t been mentioned is equipment. If you don’t already have casting equipment you need to get some. Spinning and casting outfits both have their places. A lot of bass fishing techniques (but certainly not all) really require casting gear.

    Avatarscherrman
    Participant
    Post count: 366

    Quote by: VScott

    Everything that has been mentioned is good advice. However one thing that hasn’t been mentioned is equipment. If you don’t already have casting equipment you need to get some. Spinning and casting outfits both have their places. A lot of bass fishing techniques (but certainly not all) really require casting gear.

    I love my baitcasters but there isn’t one technique I use that I couldn’t also use on my spinning reel.

    Avatarbigbuckhunter88
    Participant
    Post count: 1141

    Quote by: scherrman

    Quote by: VScott

    Everything that has been mentioned is good advice. However one thing that hasn’t been mentioned is equipment. If you don’t already have casting equipment you need to get some. Spinning and casting outfits both have their places. A lot of bass fishing techniques (but certainly not all) really require casting gear.

    I love my baitcasters but there isn’t one technique I use that I couldn’t also use on my spinning reel.

    Technically yes, but throwing frogs in pads or grass or jigs in mats or wood are much easier with the a casting set up.

    Avatarscherrman
    Participant
    Post count: 366

    Quote by: bigbuckhunter88

    Quote by: scherrman

    Quote by: VScott

    Everything that has been mentioned is good advice. However one thing that hasn’t been mentioned is equipment. If you don’t already have casting equipment you need to get some. Spinning and casting outfits both have their places. A lot of bass fishing techniques (but certainly not all) really require casting gear.

    I love my baitcasters but there isn’t one technique I use that I couldn’t also use on my spinning reel.

    Technically yes, but throwing frogs in pads or grass or jigs in mats or wood are much easier with the a casting set up.

    Certainly more beneficial with a baitcast reel but does not require. I fished those techniques on spinning gear just fine up until a few years ago.

    Avatarwebspec_admin
    Keymaster
    Post count: 18880

    Coming from someone who just started bass fishing last summer I know the struggle. It seems there is so much out there to use and different ways of using it. I have had a lot of luck throwing craws and senkos Texas rigged. Super easy to use. I’ve also had a lot of luck this year on chatter baits, which are just as simple to use, just chuck them out and reel it back in, keep your rod tip low. Caught my first 4# bass on a chatterbait just a week ago.

    It helps to ask questions. A good friend of mine has helped me out a lot, so if you know someone to go out with that would be my best advice. Otherwise, like others have said, look up videos on youtube, facebook fishing pages, etc.

    Avatargone bassin
    Participant
    Post count: 371

    If I had to use only one technique every time out bass fishing, it would be a Texas rigged plastic, hands down. As mentioned, Senkos are always killer. You can’t go wrong with a curl tail worm too. Don’t be afraid to use big baits. Even smaller fish will inhale a 10″ worm.

    One thing that I don’t think was mentioned – Bass are near bottom a great deal of the time. Yes, they will suspend, and you can use lures that will get them to come up to the surface or near surface to bite; but day in and day out, especially in these hot summer conditions we have now, they will most often be relating to bottom and tight to any cover that offers some respite from the warm surface temps.

    Also, try to hit prime times. Around sunrise and sunset is a general rule to really get out there and fish. That’s when they are more inclined to hit topwater type baits. My 2 cents!

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