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  • northwoodsbucks
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    Hi Guys,

    After hunting grouse and pheasant over my Brittany for 12 years we finally had to put him down this spring. I had been considering putting off adding another bird dog for a bit, but I decided that I am going to get another pup. An English Setter this time. Below are some questions I am considering.

    1. Get one that is born October and would come home in December or a spring pup. This is what the trainer I will use recommended as he will be ready for real training by early spring and about a year old. He also said house training is easier in the winter. Or get a spring pup which in my past experience was easier for house training and socialization.
    2. A training collar. I liked my old tritronics G3, nothing special but worked great. I replaced with with a Garmin delta which was total garbage. I was going to switch to dogtra, the one with the beeper and trainer, but the garmin alpha with the GPS has some appeal as well. I hunt in northern MN and WI a lot and a lost dog worries me with the wolf population there. It is a bunch more money, but on the other hand I look at a training color as a 10 year investment and it is is top quality and works well the extra $ for the GPS might be worth it.
    3. I want to raise birds to train with, however my training ground is a mile or so from my house, I dont think call back quail will return that far after being released. Would homing pigeons be a more effective option?
    Greg 57
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    I used pigeon to train my lab and yes they would return to the guy I bought them from, lol.

    Later on I would cut their flight feathers to where they could fly short distances. This would give the dog and me some extra training to get the dog to hold after the flush. May not have been best for the bird.

    I used one drop of pheasant scent on some birds and would do the same with quail and duck because I hunted all three.

    A trainer I new told me that pigeons don’t have much scent and to use “only one drop” because you didn’t want the scent to be to wet.

    I made this mistake when placing retriever dummies in the field. All I can say is use as little of the bottled scent as possible.

    Also the fight feathers will grow back and the guy gets his birds back when your done with them. Or you could just cage them and bread them. The young will stay.

    HTH

    Anonymous
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    First of all, I send my condolences on the loss of your partner. To answer some of your questions, I would suggest the following.

    1. When you get a dog is a matter of personal preference but also, that of opportunity. If a litter is ready to go in winter, you may need to strike when the iron is hot. I prefer to have a dog a year old before exposing them to actual field conditions. However, this is highly dependent on the individual dog and his maturation. I actually hunted my longhaired Weimaraner at 5 months because he was ready. The result was successful retrieving and pointing. Not all of my dogs have been ready.
    2. Training collar. This again is a personal choice. I use the Garmin Pro 70 which is a very basic collar. Friends with excellent dogs use the SportDog collar. One thing to think about- do you want to spend all of your time manipulating electronics or focus on hunting? That being said, in dense grouse country, a GPS collar gives additional security.
    3. Pigeons will work great for training purposes. I would actually suggest them over quail given your access to land.

    Good luck with your English Setter. They are dependable, hard working dogs. My first dog was a Setter who was an exceptional hunter and friend for nearly 16 years. Check back in and let us know about your progress!

    Bevvie
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    Dog training is the application of behavior analysis which uses or Do the test for environmental events of antecedents and consequences to modify the dog behavior, either for it to assist in specific activities or undertake particular tasks, or for it to participate effectively in contemporary domestic life.

    • This reply was modified 9 months ago by Bevvie.
    • This reply was modified 9 months ago by Bevvie.
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