Home Forums Hunting Predator/Varmint Hunting my calling tally…update

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  • Avatarbuckthelab
    Participant
    Post count: 343

    number of sets made: 40+

    coyotes killed: 0

    shots fired: 0

    coyotes seen: 0

    number of animals that might have been coyotes barking at me when I stood up to leave: 1

    hours wasted: many

    I don’t know how you guys do it but I am ready to give up. 🙁

    AvatarKeokukCoboy
    Participant
    Post count: 791

    number of sets made: 40+

    coyotes killed: 0

    shots fired: 0

    coyotes seen: 0

    number of animals that might have been coyotes barking at me when I stood up to leave: 1

    hours wasted: many

    I don’t know how you guys do it but I am ready to give up

    No one can say that your not dedicated. I hope some of the guys will chime in and help you out. There’s lots of things that can go wrong. Can you give us a little description of how your hunting what type of terrain, cover. Are your calls mouth calls or electronic. 40 plus sets you would think a person would at least see a few. Do you hunt different areas ect. ect. Don’t give up and don’t consider your time wasted. Consider them school hours. Frustrating….You bet .I’m also in a slump but I haven’t been out much and when I have I’ve seen zilch. If you can, think about hooking up with someone in your area for a couple of hunts. Good luck n stay in the game!!

    Avatargundog870
    Participant
    Post count: 412

    Have any calls for sale?

    ihuntducksalot72ihuntducksalot72
    Participant
    Post count: 1438

    buck,

    What sort of area are you calling? Are you calling areas with enough cover the coyotes can feel comfortable moving in to the calls in the daylight? I’d say that would be the first thing that comes to mind. Also, is there enough hills, terrain, and other cover that you can get in without spooking the coyotes? Most sets are blown before they ever start because the area people are calling doesn’t have enough cover for the coyote to come in, or its too flat and feature less and the chances of the hunter getting in and not getting pegged is pretty slim. After that I would say the next big reason for not getting a coyote on a set, was getting in fine, calling one up, but either getting pegged on stand before you see him, or just never seeing the coyote you called. You might be suprised how many you’ve had in at times and just never saw. About all you can do about this is set yourself up where your hidden, but have a very good veiw of the area and hold still!

    How are you playing the wind? At your back, at your face, crossing your face? And how is that wind blowing into the section? When setting up you need to be sure that your scent is not only not blowing into the area the coyote may approach from, but try to walk in and set up so it isn’t blowing into areas of cover where you expect the coyotes to be at before you approach. Playing the wind for coyotes, isn’t an perfect science, sometimes you just can’t beat it, but taking care to pay attention will give you the best chance for success. The wind will take your stink somewhere, it just has to, but set up so its affecting the least amount of the area, (ie not blowing into the section or cover) and is crossing your face at some angle that allows you to see an approaching coyote in the cover your watching before it can scent you. This gives you the best chance of not getting winded before you start calling. When you set up watching the cover you expect the coyote to approach in, Make sure you will have a chance to see the coyote in the cover before he winds you. They will almost always try to circle down wind several hundred yards to get a sniff of what they are hearing.

    Also, how much are you calling and what sort of calls are you using? Mouth calling works just fine, but the biggest mistake I used to make was calling waaaaaaaaaay too much. You get that feeling you have to really woo them in and talk and talk to them, but you really don’t. When you make a set, start up, make a couple howls or some distress, and sit around for 10-15 minutes before you do much more. Your distress really only need to be short series too. Usually a handful of squalls, 10 to 15 seconds max will do. If there is a coyote near and he hears that and is in the mood to respond through a hunger, territorial, or just plain curiosity response, that will do. Any more calling doesn’t help and isn’t going to call in the ones that weren’t coming. More calling just makes for a greater chance the one thats coming pegs you. My sets are usually 30 minutes, I will usually open with a howl this time of year, then make some distress noise at 10, 20, and 27 minutes. (not exact, just something to give you an idea) The only time I call a lot or let the caller run more is when I’m night calling. I’ve found they are not bothered by it and have even found constant calling to be of a benefit at times.

    I think a lot of issues people have calling, come out of what we see on predator calling DVDs and TV shows. Most of them are shot out west on coyotes that might as well be different creatures. They are much more aggressive, hungry, and less wary of people due to less contact in the big areas they live which makes them way more callable. You watch the show, they walk out, plop the caller down, fire it up and let it run continuous cycling through various sounds, until the coyote, or usually two, or three or even four run in, usually hard charging into the open area right in front of the caller. This just doesn’t work well in our area, but when you want to learn and watch a video that’s what you see. I know I fell into this trap when I was newer. Took me a while to find out that its just more of a finess game.

    Around my area there are about 3 groups of houndsman chasing coyotes, a couple groups that spot and stalk/push them, a couple other callers, and most of the locals/farmers/hunters out chasing other stuff will shoot at one if they are out and about and see one. Thats a lot of pressure, and the bold animals that don’t take care don’t last long. The ones that are left are the ones that aren’t going to break open territory in the daylight often to come to a call, aren’t going to deal with much racket from an approaching caller and still respond, and are sure gone if they catch a wiff of you. I’d guess that’s the coyote most callers are dealing with. Knowing this upfront can help you craft your game to allow you to still get one some coyotes. Don’t give up! I’ve had my slumps here and there, but there is nothing more exciting in the hunting world than calling in a big coyote and putting it down!

    AvatarBushFamilyNine
    Participant
    Post count: 354

    Maybe it is just bad timing? Did you do any road scouting before you hunted these sets?

    I saw more coyotes today in west central Iowa in this crappy weather before 10 AM and after 4PM than I have seen all last year. Some of them were within 100 yards of the road along waterways where the fog was thick.

    Avatardigbyodell
    Participant
    Post count: 2

    Quote by: buckthelab

    number of sets made: 40+

    coyotes killed: 0

    shots fired: 0

    coyotes seen: 0

    number of animals that might have been coyotes barking at me when I stood up to leave: 1

    hours wasted: many

    I don’t know how you guys do it but I am ready to give up. 🙁

    I am in the same boat… We have tried just about everything we had read/seen… I have hunted with the wind in my face/back/side.. to no avail..

    Talked to a farmer and he said he had yotes coming up to his house harassing his house cats.. We went out and couldn’t even get a yote to yip back…

    I live near Dubuque and am about to throw in the towel…

    AvatarDWC
    Post count: 77

    If I remember right Randy Anderson said on one of his original calling videos that he gets asked a lot how many sets he sees yotes on. I think he said 3/10. Thats a dude that I would consider a pro and he’s hunting in some awesome areas. Don’t be like so many that watch these shows on tv and when they try it for themselves it’s not quite so exciting. I”ve went 30 plus stands in a row before and saw nothing at all. Then, just when you think you have absolutely no idea what you’re doing…BAM one almost runs you over after you howl twice. Moral is-keep trying.

    Avatarmr.icefishing
    Participant
    Post count: 726

    I’m gonna take my new foxpro out for the 1st time tomorrow. We’re gonna do a couple of coyote sets and then try for some coons. I’ll post how it goes.

    scruffyscruffy
    Participant
    Post count: 2421

    I started calling back before the internet, back before dedicated predator magazines, tv shows, etc. There was the information on the back of the call package and the occasional field and stream article, and that was about it. I didn’t even know anyone that called coyotes, or remember why I started. In my first few years of calling I called up a few with a boom box and a baby cottontail tape and it took a long time before I called one in with a hand call, and even longer to get it killed…

    I could have tossed in the towel, but never considered it. It was fun just getting out and hunting. And it was a great challenge and when I called one in it felt like a great accomplishment as well as a great wonderment. It took time, years and years, but I eventually learned what made for a successful stand for me in the area I hunt. I learned the “hard way” by todays standards with dvd’s, magazines, the internet. But today there’s all kinds of contradicting information and also this illusion that it’s easy to consistently call a coyote, at least here.

    I’m still learning a bunch. I keep detailed records and continue to fine tune my calling, continue to add tricks to the bag of things I can do in this or that situation, etc. The more I learn about coyotes, the more I learn I don’t know about them. So they’ll never get boring or “easy” to call. I’ve been averaging a couple dozen callups and spotted coyotes a year with 65-70% of them ending up dead. I don’t know how many stands I do a year, but it’s a lot. And like I said, I’m amazed at how much I learn every year!

    You’re just on the beginning of that curve. If the enjoyment of coyote hunting isn’t getting out and hunting, seeing the sun rise or set, seeing all the other critters out and about, blowing on a call or working a remote, then you’ll have many stands that give little to no enjoyment. If the enjoyment comes mostly from killing a coyote, or at least calling one in, you’re going to disappointed many trips back home. If that’s the case, I’d quit also, there are other things to do that would probably be a better fit for your time. Life is too short to spend it frustrated on your free time. Find something you truly enjoy.

    Or maybe all the dvd’s, this and that, has you focused on the kill and you haven’t stopped and smelled the roses. Maybe the next time out, do everything to kill a coyote, but sit back, take a deep breath, and soak up and enjoy the time outdoors. If you call in a coyote then it’ll just be a bonus.

    If you go back to your vehicle after soaking it in, feeling the same, no enjoyment, ready to give it up, then do that. Go try something else. If you change your mind, the coyotes will still be there if you come back to the sport.

    This might sound calloused, but like i said, life is short and you should do something enjoy in your time off. Just because it looks fun or whatever on TV or looks like a challenge or has cool toys, doesn’t mean it’s for you.

    later,
    scruffy

    jimneyjimney
    Participant
    Post count: 2007

    I second that. There is no substitute for putting in your time and dealing with the learning curve. My hunting partner and I had many trips calling before we got our first dog. Then there were many lulls and lots of time in between for quite some time. It’s still not a sport where you go out and expect to get one 50 percent of the time. But over time your success should go up. As mentioned above you are in the beginning of the learning curve. Keep plugging away and you will figure it out.

    AvatarLovetohunt
    Participant
    Post count: 43

    I have had some very dry coyote runs myself its frustrating but you have to then regroup and try to study what you have done wrong, what you can try different. While most coyotes follow certain rules of their species with the adaptation of humans there are variations to this. What I am trying to say is try all kids of things even ones that may sound like no way …. I love the hunt whether I shoot or not keep at it!!!

    Avatardigbyodell
    Participant
    Post count: 2

    Sat morning while walking back to the truck, one of the guys said “the yotes around here might be call shy” That got me thinking…

    Sat on here last night reading for hours and hours…

    Went out this morning by myself.. Was thinking about the “call shy” comment… I got out in the woods about 6 am… put Charlie (my decoy) out about 40 yards slinked back to a pill of downed trees and sat there motionless for about 15 minutes.. listening to nature in all its glory.. I let out a locator yip and sure enough from out in the distance I hear a couple yotes yip back… I sit there for about 10-15 more minute and off in the distance I see a yote walking through the timber… to far off for a shot and figure he is circling around to try to get down wind of me… After about 20 minutes of seeing him/losing him in the tree line up he pops within 150-175 yards..

    Needless to say Whitewater Canyon is one less yote this morning 🙂 I don’t care if I wouldn’t have been able to put a round into him, just the thrill of knowing what I(we) where doing wrong is enough to rejuvenate my love of hunting these Wile E lil critters…

    Over calling, I think was our problem!!

    Avatarduckboy53
    Participant
    Post count: 83

    What does everyone suggest for a howler? I have an electronic caller, but would like a more realistic sound for howling and yips.

    ihuntducksalot72ihuntducksalot72
    Participant
    Post count: 1438

    I think it’s pretty hard to beat a Dan Thompson howler. I like mine.

    I also use a primos hot dog occasionally that I keep as an extra, and I use a couple varieties of diagphram howlers. I’ve never been a big fan of the howls that have come on my callers or the way they sound, so I usually make them myself. Your on the right track finding yourself a howler and learning some coyote speak!

    AvatarKeokukCoboy
    Participant
    Post count: 791

    As far as a howler I took the barrel off my R Anderson and stuck the mouth piece on the end of a cowhorn..I love it

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