Home Forums Fishing Trout Fishing I vote C&R Only in all IA trout streams from last stocking to first stocking

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  • stick500stick500
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    Post count: 457

    Quote by: SR+Dave[]

    Again, as a wintertime angler, why can I not eat a few trout same as the summertime angler?

    Because they aren’t being replenished every week. Once the fish are taken out of our little stretches in these mild Fall climates, what’s the point of fishing for the rest of the winter?

    That’s the whole point of my argument.

    AvatarTrapCyclone
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    Post count: 2552

    This kind of begs the question — why do they stop stocking trout for the winter in the first place? Rather than add more regulations I would be more interested in having the DNR do some winter stocking or, at the very least, spreading out the existing stocking schedule so that some trout are stocked in the winter as well. Maybe their mortality is too high for winter stocking, but I wouldn’t think so seeing as the urban trout stocking program goes on throughout the winter months.

    AvatarSR Dave
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    Post count: 170

    Quote by: stick500

    Quote by: SR+Dave[]

    Again, as a wintertime angler, why can I not eat a few trout same as the summertime angler?

    Because they aren’t being replenished every week. Once the fish are taken out of our little stretches in these mild Fall climates, what’s the point of fishing for the rest of the winter?

    That’s the whole point of my argument.

    So you are saying when I buy a trout stamp it should only be good for catch and release?

    If your desire is to have plentiful trout in the steams all year long, why not lobby to adjust the stocking schedule to all year long? Why deprive winter anglers their opportunity to take a trout or two for the pan? Seems a bit unfair to the guy who only fishes the streams in the winter.

    Avatarspeng5
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    Post count: 2928

    Quote by: TrapCyclone

    at the very least, spreading out the existing stocking schedule so that some trout are stocked in the winter as well.

    I’d be interested in the pros and cons of that as well. I am of the thought that several streams don’t need the amount of stockings they get. Many times I have gone to a stream that has been stocked DAYS ago, and still caught tons of fish with relative ease. Either there aren’t as many people going on stocking day as they think, or those that do are inept, because these aren’t hard fish to catch. Sure places like Backbone and Bailey’s are always gonna need more fish, but maybe they could cut back on what they put at more out of the way places. The out of the way places already don’t have much traffic, due to being out of the way. Plus those looking for meat only would especially stop going there once they hear stocking numbers will decrease.

    llewellinsetterllewellinsetter
    Blocked
    Post count: 2514

    This entire thread is why some trout fishermen have a bad name.

    I love fly fishing and C&R as much as anyone but as long as the public is supporting put and take fishing by buying a trout stamp there should be no specific restrictions on those streams that receive stockings. Should we not be able to stock the ponds in winter either? Iowa will never be a trout destination and will always rely on the trout stamp funding to maintain a fishable population. As soon as you start messing around with complicated regulations that exclude people from fishing you will start losing fisherman and funding. If you want to designate specific streams as C&R only they should be off limits to stocking for population and should rely on natural production which will never gain in population. NE Iowa id a nice trout fishery but it will never be a sustainable wild trout fishery.

    Sarcasm entails a few things: one of them is intellect, another one is a sense of humor, and a third - not taking things too personally.

    Avatarmbchilton
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    Post count: 511

    Iowa has made big strides toward becoming a wild trout fishery in the last 20-30 years. Browns are doing great and will continue to improve. Attention is now on finding a brook trout that will work well in Iowa. It’s not going to happen quickly, but if we find a strain of brookie that takes off as well as our browns you’ll hear more people make the case that we stop stocking rainbows in those streams and enact more protections for the fish.

    llewellinsetterllewellinsetter
    Blocked
    Post count: 2514

    Quote by: mbchilton

    Iowa has made big strides toward becoming a wild trout fishery in the last 20-30 years. Browns are doing great and will continue to improve. Attention is now on finding a brook trout that will work well in Iowa. It�s not going to happen quickly, but if we find a strain of brookie that takes off as well as our browns you�ll hear more people make the case that we stop stocking rainbows in those streams and enact more protections for the fish.

    And the betterment has been because those people fishing for stocked rainbows are buying stamps. Take that away and then you’ll have no one buying trout stamps to support the funding. There simply is not enough interest outside of the weekend trout slayer to support this kind of thinking.

    Sarcasm entails a few things: one of them is intellect, another one is a sense of humor, and a third - not taking things too personally.

    Avatarmhock
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    Post count: 3353

    Quote by: speng5

    I’m not going to chime in on this,

    Not calling you out , just struck me as humorous! 😆
    B)

    Avatarspeng5
    Participant
    Post count: 2928

    Quote by: mhock

    Quote by: speng5

    I’m not going to chime in on this,

    Not calling you out , just struck me as humorous! 😆
    B)

    In fairness I did wait a few posts before chiming back in :mrgreen:

    Avatarmbchilton
    Participant
    Post count: 511

    Quote by: llewellinsetter

    Quote by: mbchilton

    Iowa has made big strides toward becoming a wild trout fishery in the last 20-30 years. Browns are doing great and will continue to improve. Attention is now on finding a brook trout that will work well in Iowa. It�s not going to happen quickly, but if we find a strain of brookie that takes off as well as our browns you�ll hear more people make the case that we stop stocking rainbows in those streams and enact more protections for the fish.

    And the betterment has been because those people fishing for stocked rainbows are buying stamps. Take that away and then you’ll have no one buying trout stamps to support the funding. There simply is not enough interest outside of the weekend trout slayer to support this kind of thinking.

    A wild trout fishery requires far less resources. Hatcheries are a big expense. Anyone know the dollar amount on what it costs to raise a catchable size trout? Isn’t it something like $10? 380,000 stocked trout in 2017. A trout stamp costs $12.50 for 2018, and in 2014 there were 43,000 sold. You do the math. Trout stamps are nice money to have, but they’re not the reason for the success of our trout program.

    Avatarspeng5
    Participant
    Post count: 2928

    Quote by: mbchilton

    Quote by: llewellinsetter

    Quote by: mbchilton

    .

    Anyone know the dollar amount on what it costs to raise a catchable size trout? Isn�t it something like $10?.

    Dang, I caught a lot of money this year. Who knew trout were Worth more than the coon I’m not trapping this year.

    Avatarmbchilton
    Participant
    Post count: 511

    Quote by: speng5

    Quote by: mbchilton

    Quote by: llewellinsetter

    Quote by: mbchilton

    .

    Anyone know the dollar amount on what it costs to raise a catchable size trout? Isn�t it something like $10?.

    Dang, I caught a lot of money this year. Who knew trout were Worth more than the coon I�m not trapping this year.

    It’s true. People don’t realize the cost of stocking that fish. I just double checked my number, and found a report from the Ohio DNR from January 2015 saying it cost them $9.41 to raise a 10-12” rainbow trout.

    llewellinsetterllewellinsetter
    Blocked
    Post count: 2514

    Quote by: mbchilton

    Quote by: llewellinsetter

    Quote by: mbchilton

    Iowa has made big strides toward becoming a wild trout fishery in the last 20-30 years. Browns are doing great and will continue to improve. Attention is now on finding a brook trout that will work well in Iowa. It�¢ï¿½ï¿½s not going to happen quickly, but if we find a strain of brookie that takes off as well as our browns you�¢ï¿½ï¿½ll hear more people make the case that we stop stocking rainbows in those streams and enact more protections for the fish.

    And the betterment has been because those people fishing for stocked rainbows are buying stamps. Take that away and then you’ll have no one buying trout stamps to support the funding. There simply is not enough interest outside of the weekend trout slayer to support this kind of thinking.

    A wild trout fishery requires far less resources. Hatcheries are a big expense. Anyone know the dollar amount on what it costs to raise a catchable size trout? Isn�t it something like $10? 380,000 stocked trout in 2017. A trout stamp costs $12.50 for 2018, and in 2014 there were 43,000 sold. You do the math. Trout stamps are nice money to have, but they�re not the reason for the success of our trout program.

    Your using logic that keeps out so many variables that because your focused on a want and not a want that the majority of fishermen want. The average trout fisherman is the guy drowning worms on a medium rod with 10 lb line expecting to get a limit and fry them up for dinner while sitting in the Highlandville campground. Take away the ability to catch stocked rainbow trout, one of the easiest, readily available and family oriented traditions for our youth, and see what happens to the overall fishing.
    The good fishing, the return of native species, the great habitat, and everything in between is because we give people the opportunity to catch 12 inch rainbows at easily accessible streams and ponds throughout the state. How many people do you think would visit NE Iowa if they didn’t have the opportunity to catch those fish? Like it or not, this aint, Montana, Colorado, or even Arkansas.

    Believe me I’m not against hoping for a better fishery with some awesome 4″ brookies that I can catch on a 3 weight BUT we will never have any of that if we take away the bread and butter.

    Sarcasm entails a few things: one of them is intellect, another one is a sense of humor, and a third - not taking things too personally.

    Avatarspeng5
    Participant
    Post count: 2928

    Quote by: mbchilton

    Quote by: speng5

    Quote by: mbchilton

    Quote by: llewellinsetter

    Quote by: mbchilton

    .

    Anyone know the dollar amount on what it costs to raise a catchable size trout? Isn�¢ï¿½ï¿½t it something like $10?.

    Dang, I caught a lot of money this year. Who knew trout were Worth more than the coon I�m not trapping this year.

    It�s true. People don�t realize the cost of stocking that fish. I just double checked my number, and found a report from the Ohio DNR from January 2015 saying it cost them $9.41 to raise a 10-12� rainbow trout.

    Just playing devils advocate here as I don’t know enough about this to make an educated guess. But what does a 11” wild fish cost in terms of the watershed and water quality improvements made in order to make previously non fertile trout waters fertile? Like watershed improvement labor and material cost to trout biomass? I do realize in time the cost washes out as improvements aren’t made constantly after a certain point but after that point it will still produce wild trout. A good investment Imo as that cost to biomass ratio gets better every year ideally.

    Avatarmhock
    Participant
    Post count: 3353

    Anyone know the difference in the number of fishing licenses sold as opposed to trout stamps?

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