Home Forums Trapping / Fur Handling Fur Handling Hide tanning

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  • Avatarrfireman
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    Post count: 444

    So I have a coyote that I have just finished skinning, I get the whole fleshing out process, what is a good beginner process to tan the hide myself? I’m looking for something fairly idiot proof. B)

    Avatarwalleye warrior
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    Post count: 445

    cant help you with tanning a coyotes hide,but I can give you all kinds of ways mom used to tan mine!! sssshhhhheeeezzzzz!! I think that woman enjoyed it lol

    Avatarkenhump
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    Post count: 12769

    I remember some stuff in an orange bottle at one of the box.stores that looked good. Or you could go old school and try brain, urine or chewing it. 😉 Cabelas maybe.

    Avatarspeng5
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    Post count: 2928

    Orange stuff works pretty good, you can get bottles of it at Scheel’s or Bass Pro. You oughta be able to do 2-3 coyotes with whats in a bottle. Follow the instructions to a T and you will have a decent product to hang on a wall or in the man cave.

    If you want a GARMENT quality tan, have it tanned by a pro. Hides tanned with the orange bottle stuff remain relatively stiff and the inside (skin side) will be rough and gritty and not all that pliable. A pro tan is a completey soft, smooth product that could later be made into a hat, mittens etc. due to being so much more supple.

    http://www.sleepycreektannery.com/

    ^^This fellow has gotten great reviews both on IowaTrappersTalk and Trapperman. Local guy who is outstanding at his craft, and has earned a reputation as a straight shooter business wise. Fair prices, GREAT quality work, honest and accurate about estimating turnaround times. Many horror stories out there about guys sending fur out of state to big outfits to get tanned, and not getting back their actual critter. You might get a coyote tanned in the mail but at a big outfit it may or may not be yours. I haven’t heard one bad word about Ben at SLeepy Creek.

    Looks like Ben charges $25 for a coyote. Seeing as the orange bottle stuff is 10-15 bucks in stores plus your gas to go there and get it, and also sales tax, spend the extra $10 for a QUALITY product that you know will last forever.

    Avatarkenhump
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    Post count: 12769

    Thanks Speng. I just remembered the orange bottle. I remember experimenting with tanning many winters ago. First victim was a nice possum. Ised black walnut bark. Tannins worked okay, but. I didn’t get it fleshed quite as good as it could have been. Also way underestimated the dying properties of the walnut husks. Result it was supple, but looked looked a bit like a small, shaggy roadkill beaver, with the mange. I did get pretty good with rabbits with some stuff from Herters. Doubt that even exists any more.

    Avatarspeng5
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    Post count: 2928

    Quote by: kenhump

    Thanks Speng. I just remembered the orange bottle. I remember experimenting with tanning many winters ago. First victim was a nice possum. Ised black walnut bark. Tannins worked okay, but. I didn’t get it fleshed quite as good as it could have been. Also way underestimated the dying properties of the walnut husks. Result it was supple, but looked looked a bit like a small, shaggy roadkill beaver, with the mange. I did get pretty good with rabbits with some stuff from Herters. Doubt that even exists any more.

    I have wondered about using natural stuff to tan, from my understanding it CAN produce a supple, soft skin but you have to either sand it, wire wheel it (on tough skins, not thin like fox) or break it over a rope

    AvatarBrad Phillips
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    Post count: 3188

    Big hides were “broke” over a post set in the ground. Smaller stuff was chewed on.

    I will be taking a couple Yotes over to Ben in Wellsburg. I have a few things tanned every year for me or buddies who want stuff done. Ben does a great job and has a well earned reputation.

    AvatarBrad Phillips
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    Post count: 3188

    Right now, while it is cold would be a good time to ship a hide.

    Avatarkenhump
    Participant
    Post count: 12769

    I got better at fleshing out hides. Sold rabbit hides by the pound. Did a couple fox with the Herters stuff that were mounted flat on heavy felt that was trimmed using a pinking shears. Looked pretty good. Stiff, but no odor. Used aluminimium sulfate I believe on it when curing. Good old Gilberts chemistry set. That ser would probably bring out Homeland and ATF both today. 😆

    Avatarrfireman
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    Post count: 444

    Thanks for the replies, it’s off to Wellsburg.

    IaCraigIaCraig
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    Post count: 1709

    I think that is a good choice. Depending upon your past experience with fleshing and working hides, I’d say your chances are less than 75% of liking the 1st few you try.

    Like others, I also have a goal to someday learning to tan hides using natural cures (like brains). About 20 years ago, I tanned 4 or 5 deer hides and 1 raccoon with decent results on about 50% of them using kits from tandy leather called “tannery in a box”. (I do not see it on their current website). Hair off deer hides were a lot of work, and the end result still wasn’t as supple as I hoped. I also experimented with some squirrels using a different 1 step bottled product(probably the same orange stuff others mentioned), results were quite good but it warned not to use leather tanned with the bottle for clothing. (I think it warned that it could be caustic to the skin).

    Now that my kids are grown up, I should have time to try it again.

    Avatarpaulblair4
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    Post count: 3

    Thanks for the replies.

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