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  • jnrbronc
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    Finished replacing the carb and the muffler on the Troy Bilt tiller this weekend. Oil change is next.

    We will be starting sets soon. Anybody else getting the itch?

    orngruffee
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    Looks like a good old horse model. Got rid of the one I had when I downsized the garden.
    Mistake.

    TeamAsgrow
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    I have herbs growing in my window sill. I checked on spinach that I over wintered and it should go crazy as soon as we stop getting snowed on. I planted garlic under a cover last fall, it has sprouted and looks good as well.

    CRIA1576
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    Used part of tax return to buy a 60″ Behlen tiller for garden and food plots. It is a beast, and shares same design and many components with King Kutter Professional. Looking forward to pulverizing some dirt in the next couple weeks.

    Also order 2 peach and 2 apple trees from fastgrowingtrees.com. They should arrive in April for planting and are guaranteed to bear fruit the first year. Trees are 5-7′ tall.

    BrownItsDown
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    Quote by: TeamAsgrow

    I have herbs growing in my window sill. I checked on spinach that I over wintered and it should go crazy as soon as we stop getting snowed on. I planted garlic under a cover last fall, it has sprouted and looks good as well.

    Hey TeamAsgrow, you asked a while back for a pic of the tandem disc I built for my track loader. Every time I’ve been up by it, I’ve forgotten to take a pic, so here’s this. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JigN0qBMLlc I built mine really similar to the one in this video. Bought an old heavy-duty tandem disc, just a little wider than my tracks. Sawed off and ground down the 3-pt harness on the front, flipped around the discs and welded a quick-attach plate onto the 3-pt end, so that I can push it. My disc blades are round, not notched, but it still works really well. I can put a ton of down-force on it and really tear up the earth, but I tend to break discs when I find rocks and stumps this way. It kicks up a ton of dust directly in-front of you, and you drive over the disced ground, (track machines don’t compact soil much), but other than that, it works awesome.

    oldstylelight
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    I got rid of my tiller when i went to all raised beds. Wish I still had the tiller, but the raised beds are worth the effort to put in. IMO.

    Last fall I emptied a pickup load of compost on my garden, so I am ready to plant whenever the soil warms up.

    TeamAsgrow
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    Quote by: BrownItsDown

    Quote by: TeamAsgrow

    I have herbs growing in my window sill. I checked on spinach that I over wintered and it should go crazy as soon as we stop getting snowed on. I planted garlic under a cover last fall, it has sprouted and looks good as well.

    Hey TeamAsgrow, you asked a while back for a pic of the tandem disc I built for my track loader. Every time I’ve been up by it, I’ve forgotten to take a pic, so here’s this. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JigN0qBMLlc I built mine really similar to the one in this video. Bought an old heavy-duty tandem disc, just a little wider than my tracks. Sawed off and ground down the 3-pt harness on the front, flipped around the discs and welded a quick-attach plate onto the 3-pt end, so that I can push it. My disc blades are round, not notched, but it still works really well. I can put a ton of down-force on it and really tear up the earth, but I tend to break discs when I find rocks and stumps this way. It kicks up a ton of dust directly in-front of you, and you drive over the disced ground, (track machines don’t compact soil much), but other than that, it works awesome.

    Interesting. Not sure how that would work with the toolcat since it only has one arm vs two on a skid steer. I might have to fab up something from old equipment we have to drag behind the tractor. I would rather put the wear and tear a 50+ year old tractor instead of the toolcat.

    TeamAsgrow
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    Quote by: oldstylelight

    I got rid of my tiller when i went to all raised beds. Wish I still had the tiller, but the raised beds are worth the effort to put in. IMO.

    Last fall I emptied a pickup load of compost on my garden, so I am ready to plant whenever the soil warms up.

    I have not looked back since I went to raised beds.

    walleye jim
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    got tomatoes, peppers and various other seeds under the grow light this weekend… time for a warm up in the weather…

    ccb1
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    :question: I have used skid loader to peel sod and clean areas by timber
    but seams to compact soil
    its a b–ch to rotor till
    what am i doing wrong?

    DGorman
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    I’m scaling back my pepper operation this year and haven’t started any seeds. I do have a couple scorpion peppers and Carolina reapers in pots that have survived the winter in my four seasons porch.

    Maverick
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    Quote by: DGorman

    I’m scaling back my pepper operation this year and haven’t started any seeds. I do have a couple scorpion peppers and Carolina reapers in pots that have survived the winter in my four seasons porch.

    I have a scorpion pepper plant that I bonsai’d from the original batch of peppers way back from when I brought you those scorpions and reapers. It’s still healthy and it produced peppers last year. It’s 3 years old now I think. It’s been a fun experiment to shrink a full size plant into a bonsai pepper tree.

    BrownItsDown
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    Quote by: ccb1

    :question: I have used skid loader to peel sod and clean areas by timber
    but seams to compact soil
    its a b–ch to rotor till
    what am i doing wrong?

    If your bucket has teeth, (it’s easier with teeth anyway), walk your skid loader backward 6 to 12 inches at a time with the bucket. Stab the bucket in 8 to 10 inches or so. Scoop up just enough to break that strip of topsoil loose. Backup 6 to 12 inches and repeat. Then run the rototiller through the area. It’s not as time consuming as it sounds. If these areas are filled with thick webs of tree roots, you may need to do this a time or two over the next 2 or 3 years prior to being able to successfully run a rototiller through there.

    DGorman
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    Quote by: Maverick

    Quote by: DGorman

    I’m scaling back my pepper operation this year and haven’t started any seeds. I do have a couple scorpion peppers and Carolina reapers in pots that have survived the winter in my four seasons porch.

    I have a scorpion pepper plant that I bonsai’d from the original batch of peppers way back from when I brought you those scorpions and reapers. It’s still healthy and it produced peppers last year. It’s 3 years old now I think. It’s been a fun experiment to shrink a full size plant into a bonsai pepper tree.

    That’s pretty cool. I’ve never heard of anyone trying that. I bet it would be a fun experiment. It might be four years even. My wife still laughs and tells people about the truck stop pepper plant transaction. I still have seeds from the one that was supposed to be a reaper but was some sort of hot cherry pepper. I’ve been growing them every year because I’m afraid to lose them since I can’t figure out what kind of pepper they are. They are hot and make great pickled sandwich peppers. I probably should go through seeds and see what I need to grow this year…

    Maverick
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    Quote by: DGorman

    Quote by: Maverick

    Quote by: DGorman

    I’m scaling back my pepper operation this year and haven’t started any seeds. I do have a couple scorpion peppers and Carolina reapers in pots that have survived the winter in my four seasons porch.

    I have a scorpion pepper plant that I bonsai’d from the original batch of peppers way back from when I brought you those scorpions and reapers. It’s still healthy and it produced peppers last year. It’s 3 years old now I think. It’s been a fun experiment to shrink a full size plant into a bonsai pepper tree.

    That’s pretty cool. I’ve never heard of anyone trying that. I bet it would be a fun experiment. It might be four years even. My wife still laughs and tells people about the truck stop pepper plant transaction. I still have seeds from the one that was supposed to be a reaper but was some sort of hot cherry pepper. I’ve been growing them every year because I’m afraid to lose them since I can’t figure out what kind of pepper they are. They are hot and make great pickled sandwich peppers. I probably should go through seeds and see what I need to grow this year…

    Lol, when you think of a truck stop transaction for plants, it’s not usually peppers that you think of! 🙂

    It has been pretty neat to do, and it was cool to see it produce little tiny peppers last summer. I got the idea from this page and followed his instructions. Mine isn’t as neat as his are, but it’s still been a fun project. If I can remember I’ll grab some pics of my plant.

    https://www.fatalii.net/Bonsai_Chiles_Bonchi

    DGorman
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    I’m going to have to try that this year. I wish I had seen it last year before I pulled the plants before the first frost. Some of them had stems that were over 1.5″ diameter. All this gardening talk got me going so I ordered some Count Dracula pepper seeds last night and ill be starting some others this weekend.

    jnrbronc
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    We overwintered a jalapeno last winter, planted it in the garden last year. Got lots of huge fruit off of it. Didn’t dig it to bring it back in this past winter.

    For someone looking to experiment with some new tomato varieties, a friend told me about a University of Florida lab that is creating new strains: http://hos.ufl.edu/kleeweb/newcultivars.html I have not ordered from them, but my friend said the tomatoes they raised were fantastic. I think they tried the Garden Gems.

    Maverick
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    Quote by: DGorman

    I’m going to have to try that this year. I wish I had seen it last year before I pulled the plants before the first frost. Some of them had stems that were over 1.5″ diameter. All this gardening talk got me going so I ordered some Count Dracula pepper seeds last night and ill be starting some others this weekend.

    I had to google Count Dracula peppers, those are cool!

    ccb1
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    . thanks for info on skid loader
    .

    rdwmpb
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    Quote by: Maverick

    Quote by: DGorman

    I’m going to have to try that this year. I wish I had seen it last year before I pulled the plants before the first frost. Some of them had stems that were over 1.5″ diameter. All this gardening talk got me going so I ordered some Count Dracula pepper seeds last night and ill be starting some others this weekend.

    I had to google Count Dracula peppers, those are cool!

    How spicy are the count dracula’s? I have been getting what I call little spicy effers from menards for the past few years. Don’t even know their real name. Very spicy when I let them dry then grind them up for pepper flakes. I’m always open to new peppers.

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