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  • ECFirearmsECFirearms
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    Post count: 1356

    Quote by: BullBlueGill

    My best apple tree is a $30 close out mac from walmart. the thing is 7 years old now and it amazing. I’ve ordered from Morse Nursery in Michigan, Deer Candy Wolfwrath’s in WI….Bottomline is, if you are not there to water, weed, mulch and stay on top of things, NO FRUIT tree will thrive. After many failed attempts of thinking planting trees and they will just grow if fenced is a huge waste of money. I learned the hard way, now my apple tree’s are fantastic but it takes some redneck engineering. I built a watering system on a scaffolding. built a few water catching devices that funnel water to a 55 gallon drums and made an over flow and a drip system. I kill all the weeds with gly, mulch yearly. Plant and go will NEVER work regardless of how great the claims are about how good of a tree it is. ANY tree from ANYWHERE will grow if you take care of it. I go there in the spring to mulch, I use leaf mulch from the city and compost. Throw that down in may….go back one time at the end of may and kill everything around. After that it pretty much takes care of itself. I haven’t had a year where it’s been so dry I had to bring water in.

    As for pollination, keep trees 15 ft apart. any farther you could have some issues. Talk to someone about trees that are good cross pollinators. I picks apple trees, 3 early season, 3 oct and 3 crab apple that are latter dropping. I made a funnel system that when an apple drops it goes outside of the fence. Keep the deer off them with a fence, water, weed and mulch. there is not much else to it…..just don’t plant and hope nature will do it for you. I pull most of my apples/buds off and it apparently makes the branches bigger and stronger. who knows if that’s true. I let them all just grow now.

    I see this mentioned a couple of times that it does not matter where the trees are from in the previous posts.
    I suggest doing some research on whether trees, of the same variety, from different climates will thrive in Iowa.
    I have worked with the Iowa State Forest Nursery for over 20 years on plantings and have had very good luck with my projects.
    This from their website:

    http://www.iowadnr.gov/Conservation/Forestry/State-Forest-Nursery

    Why Plant Native Trees?
    No matter where you live, it’s always best to plant trees grown from locally-adapted seed. The further a tree is planted from its seed source, the greater its risk of suffering from disease or early mortality, even if the seed source and planting site both fall within the native range of the species.

    IMHO, why not buy locally grown plants? You give your plantings a better chance to thrive and you also support locally owned IOWA businesses..

    “Second Amendment – Either you are helping pull the wagon, getting a free ride in the wagon, or trying to take away the wagon. Which one are you?” -- IAShooters

    Avatarphaffy12
    Post count: 36

    I see this mentioned a couple of times that it does not matter where the trees are from in the previous posts.
    I suggest doing some research on whether trees, of the same variety, from different climates will thrive in Iowa.
    I have worked with the Iowa State Forest Nursery for over 20 years on plantings and have had very good luck with my projects.
    This from their website:

    http://www.iowadnr.gov/Conservation/Forestry/State-Forest-Nursery

    Why Plant Native Trees?
    No matter where you live, it’s always best to plant trees grown from locally-adapted seed. The further a tree is planted from its seed source, the greater its risk of suffering from disease or early mortality, even if the seed source and planting site both fall within the native range of the species.

    IMHO, why not buy locally grown plants? You give your plantings a better chance to thrive and you also support locally owned IOWA businesses..

    This is fantastic info for native plants or those species that are actively bred for our market. And as a small business owner, I’m a huge fan of shopping local. Regrettably apples are native to central Asia and there are no large scale producers or breeders of apple trees in state (they all buy them in from MO/NY/PA nurseries and then sell them at markup). The apple tree you buy will be from a commercially or academically bred rootstock that is clonally propagated and then grafted to the scion/fruitwood that has the same production background (closest breeding station is U of Minn, most breeding in apple production areas of NW US and NE US).

    I got my degree at ISU while studying under Dr. Domoto, the apple expert of Iowa and have spent many years in specialty crop research. The info from ISU Extension is all based on local grower reports and the ISU Hort Research farm just outside of Ames. They know exactly which varieties are most likely to perform well in certain regions of Iowa. They won’t endorse a distinct retail outlet because they’re all selling the same wholesale available products more or less. Plant condition trumps the name on the front of the store as long as they carry the variety you would like to grow in the dwarfing/culture system you have selected. I can go a lot more in depth on this if you have additional questions, but generally the ISU Extension material (all available online) will get you headed in the right direction.

    Avatarkenhump
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    Post count: 12770

    Can anyone recommend a free stone, self pollenator plum?

    Avatarphaffy12
    Post count: 36

    Quote by: kenhump

    Can anyone recommend a free stone, self pollenator plum?

    Look at European varieties. They typically self pollinate and are freestone. Check hardiness for your location, not sure if you’re in zone 4 or 5. Stanley is common around here but only zone 5 hardy.

    Asians and hybrids can be more cold hardy, but need a partner for pollinating. If you’re northern Iowa zone 4, I would check with some of the cultivar releases out of U of Minn Extension. They’re nice people and have info on readily available varieties.

    Avatarkenhump
    Participant
    Post count: 12770

    Quote by: phaffy12

    Quote by: kenhump

    Can anyone recommend a free stone, self pollenator plum?

    Look at European varieties. They typically self pollinate and are freestone. Check hardiness for your location, not sure if you’re in zone 4 or 5. Stanley is common around here but only zone 5 hardy.

    Asians and hybrids can be more cold hardy, but need a partner for pollinating. If you’re northern Iowa zone 4, I would check with some of the cultivar releases out of U of Minn Extension. They’re nice people and have info on readily available varieties.

    Thanks, that’s the info I need.

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