Home Forums Fishing Fly Fishing Fly rod wt?

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  • Avatarfishing1
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    I’m Looking to upgrade my fly rod and I’m pretty much set on a fenwick aetos, but I have a dilemma on what weight to get. I mostly fish poppers and dry flies for bass and bluegill, but I would like to throw some bigger deer hair poppers and streamers as well. I have a really cheap bass pro brand 6wt that I’ve been using and its been fine, but would really like an upgrade.

    Thanks
    Fishing1

    llewellinsetterllewellinsetter
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    Post count: 2514

    If I was looking for a bass rod to throw bigger streamers I’d look or a 7’10” 8wt. Redington Predator. It’s a shorter rod for the boat, tight locals and designed specifically for casting large flies, exactly what you’re looking for. Even found you one on ebay.

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/Redington-Predator-710-8-Wt-Fly-Rod/253200104761?hash=item3af3e6fd39:g:RdoAAOSwFYxZ2-A0

    Sarcasm entails a few things: one of them is intellect, another one is a sense of humor, and a third - not taking things too personally.

    Avatarmbchilton
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    Post count: 511

    +1 for 8 wt

    Avatarfishing1
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    Would bluegill still be fun on that heavy of a rod though?

    llewellinsetterllewellinsetter
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    Quote by: fishing1

    Would bluegill still be fun on that heavy of a rod though?

    No, not at all. For reference my panfish rod is a 7’6″ 3wt, if it’s windy I’ll go with a four and with that I can handle most any bass out of a farm pond. A six should easily handle any bass in Iowa. The only reason for the 8wt is to be able to chuck heavy poppers and streamers into the wind as you requested. Realistically, I’d get a 7/8wt line on your 6wt and see what you can throw with it. If you can use it then you can get a 3/4 weight for panfish and have a much more enjoyable experience.

    Sarcasm entails a few things: one of them is intellect, another one is a sense of humor, and a third - not taking things too personally.

    Avatarmbchilton
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    Quote by: fishing1

    Would bluegill still be fun on that heavy of a rod though?

    Nope, that’s why you keep the 6.

    Avatarfowl_attitude
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    Post count: 602

    I have a 4, 6, and an 8 wt fly rods. I rarely use the 8. It has to be real windy for me to get that out, and if it is that windy it isn’t much fun to be out anyway. The 6 wt gets used the most on our farm pond. Fun for bass and pan fish. The 4 weight is used mostly for small trout streams where casting distance is not a important. I do use it occasionally for pan fish but the has to be real calm to cast a fly any distance around the pond.

    Avatardjo
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    Post count: 356

    I fear you have a dilemma. As recommended, eventually you will likely end up with 4, 6, and 8 wt rods. A 4 wt is great for bluegill poppers and flies when the wind is mild. A 6 wt will allow you to handle bigger streamers and poppers as well as stronger winds. If you really want to handle big flies or heavy fish in strong currents then an 8 wt is ideal. Ultimately you will want a good quality rod in each weight. If I was you I would upgrade your 6 wt. That is likely the rod you will use most and it will handle moderate sized streamers and poppers. Then I would go for a 4 wt because you will likely fall in love with catching bluegills on a light rod. I would hold off on the 8 wt as that would likely get the least use. My opinion only and worth about half what you paid for it.
    David

    Avatarnorthwoodsbucks
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    An 8 weight is a pretty specialized rod. It would be a good choice specifically for the larger streamers or poppers but not much else. 5 and 6 are pretty much the standard for an all purpose rod.

    Myself I have a 3, 4, and 5 that I use regularly, but have used pretty much everything 0-8 borrowed from others. If I lost them all today and was starting over I would buy a 4 and a 6 right off the bat and be covered for just about anything I wanted to do. My next purchase would be a 2, and an 8 would be last. This is mainly because I do much more fishing with conventional tackle than fly fishing and when you get to the size fly you throw with an 8 I have conventional tackle presentations that work well already.

    6wt is generally the preferred bass fishing rod for most common presentations in this part of the country and my favorite, its not to bad for pan fish either

    3wt or 4wt is a good all around pan fish rod, 4 is more versatile, 3 is more fun. If I had a 6 and only wanted one other rod it would be a 3 although having a 4 and a 2 would be better for me.

    8wt is specialized and not versatile, if you want to throw big flys though they are great

    2wt and below are also specialized and not very versatile, they can be very fun though, below 2wt finding line can be a problem as well.

    Avatarmbchilton
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    Post count: 511

    If he wants to throw big deer hair poppers and streamers, he needs an 8. For bass, 8wt is standard, not specialty.

    Avatarfishing1
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    Post count: 723

    Thanks for all the replies guys. I’m still torn, but Fenwick is out of Aetos rods so I still have some time.

    Avatarnorthwoodsbucks
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    Post count: 1519

    Quote by: mbchilton

    If he wants to throw big deer hair poppers and streamers, he needs an 8. For bass, 8wt is standard, not specialty.

    I am not sure I would call 8wt the standard as your only rod, although maybe I am wrong, I dont fly fish for bass a ton.

    I look at it like if someone was talking about regular tackle and said “I am going to buy one bass rod that I will occasionally use for pan fish also, and oh by the way I want to cast giant swim baits.”

    I could tell him that the perfect rod for you is an XXH casting rod that can toss big swim baits. Or I could say that you cant toss big swim baits with a rod that does all the other things you are talking about and that you could buy one for that but I would not recommend it as an only rod.

    So in this case yes it is the right rod for big poppers and streamers, but unless that is all you do it would be a better 2nd rod to supplement a more versatile rod like a 6. If pan fish were not part of what he does that could change the answer but in the original post is says “I mostly fish poppers and dry flies for bass and bluegill”

    If he will keep that one for this purpose and get a 2nd for the more specialized large flies then 8wt is the right answer. That did not seem to be the question though.

    Avatarmbchilton
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    Post count: 511

    Quote by: northwoodsbucks

    If he will keep that one for this purpose and get a 2nd for the more specialized large flies then 8wt is the right answer. That did not seem to be the question though.

    Gotcha. Right or wrong, that was the reasoning behind my reply.

    I put off getting an 8wt for a long time. I love the advantages for fishing farm ponds: more distance, cut through wind, throw bigger bugs, and throw moderate size bugs easier.

    Avatar56bert
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    Post count: 8

    I have a 7′ 2wt, 8′ 3wt, 9′ 4wt as well as a few 5&6wt rods. My first rod to grab on a spur of the moment is my 9″ 4wt. I can handle a fair amount of wind & still get good entertainment valve out of 6/7″ bluegill. By the way the 2 wt. rod is rather helpless with much wind. I prefer to not use a 5wt. on panfish. Good luck fly fishing. 56bert

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