Home Forums Fishing Fly Fishing Favorite flies and must have gear!

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  • AvatarTimberjunkies
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    New to the scene any advice on flies you use or for what fish would be greatly appreciated maybe you have that fly you don’t leave home without or some gear you must? Any tip or advise would be helpful thanks in advance!

    medicdanomedicdano
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    For what fish? Where? Too many variables. And give some info about your self unless you’re a spammer.

    AvatarTimberjunkies
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    Long time follower of the group new to fly fishing ive done a little as a kid long ago but nothing serious not sure what you want to know? just looking for any advise on any fish or water I plan on trying for everything including trout I’m sure every fly fisher has some go to flies or gear that a amateur might not think to bring? I’ve looked around online but since I live in central Iowa thought it would be best to go straight to some local guys isn’t that what this is all about? Thanks

    quailslayerquailslayer
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    HI-COUNTRY FLIES
    http://pistolpeteflies.com/

    Always in my fly box!

    AvatarBrad Phillips
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    Gold bead head Nymph

    AvatarTrapCyclone
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    I’m new to fly fishing myself, but from my readings the wooly bugger is supposedly a good all-around fly.

    medicdanomedicdano
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    If you have a bead hare nymph, pheasant tail nymph, prince nymph, caddis, parachute Adams, hopper, and black wooly buggar you will catch any trout in Iowa. I have caught a rediculous amount of trout in 4 different states on a prince nymph under a woolybuggar or hopper. Probably 95% of my trout. With that setup I will catch more fish per mile of stream than probably any other fisherman on it. Sounds arrogant, but I have proven it many times over.

    Buy a fly rod with a lifetime guarantee; it costs more but saves money in the long run. I like 5 weights in Iowa, tapered fluorocarbon leaders.

    Everything else is preference.

    AvatarAnonymous
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    Far from an expert but I have had good success on trout with hare’s ear nymph and a more recent find has been a pink squirrel. Trout.

    medicdanomedicdano
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    Quote by: zondy

    Far from an expert but I have had good success on trout with hare’s ear nymph and a more recent find has been a pink squirrel. Trout.

    Pink squirrel? Gotta see that one!

    AvatarAnonymous
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    Avatardjo
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    Yup. The pink squirrel is probably the most popular nymph pattern in Wisconsin. I suspect that the great secret of nymphs is that pattern makes very little difference. I usually suggest to new fly flingers that they pick a pattern they like in a couple of sizes. Say a good general nymph like a bead head hare’s ear in size 12 and 16 and learn how to get a good dead drift as near to the bottom as physically possible. Get lots of them because if you are fishing them right you will lose a fair number. Learn how to adjust drift indicators and weights (maybe even some added on the tippet) to get the nymph drifting naturally were the fish are, learn how to cast these monstrosities, and learn how to detect even subtle strikes. Once you have mastered these steps you will have most of the tricks needed to catch any fish that can be caught on nymphs. Then you can spend your time collecting more and more nymph patterns. The same is pretty much true with dry flies. Pick a generic mayfly pattern like a parachute Adams and a generic caddis pattern like an elk hair caddis, both in a range of sizes from say 12 to 18. Learn how to cast to rising fish and how to get a dead drift. Again most of the trout feeding off the surface will be fooled. Then you can buy or tie enough flies to fill a half dozen boxes.
    David

    Avatarbear2
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    I’ve had a lot of luck with the dropping any kind of bh nymph from an indicator dry fly. Also had pretty good luck with zebra midges earlier in the year and hopper patterns later in the year.

    medicdanomedicdano
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    Quote by: djo

    Yup. The pink squirrel is probably the most popular nymph pattern in Wisconsin. I suspect that the great secret of nymphs is that pattern makes very little difference. I usually suggest to new fly flingers that they pick a pattern they like in a couple of sizes. Say a good general nymph like a bead head hare’s ear in size 12 and 16 and learn how to get a good dead drift as near to the bottom as physically possible. Get lots of them because if you are fishing them right you will lose a fair number. Learn how to adjust drift indicators and weights (maybe even some added on the tippet) to get the nymph drifting naturally were the fish are, learn how to cast these monstrosities, and learn how to detect even subtle strikes. Once you have mastered these steps you will have most of the tricks needed to catch any fish that can be caught on nymphs. Then you can spend your time collecting more and more nymph patterns. The same is pretty much true with dry flies. Pick a generic mayfly pattern like a parachute Adams and a generic caddis pattern like an elk hair caddis, both in a range of sizes from say 12 to 18. Learn how to cast to rising fish and how to get a dead drift. Again most of the trout feeding off the surface will be fooled. Then you can buy or tie enough flies to fill a half dozen boxes.
    David

    All true but the second sentence. most times in dingy water you are right. But there are days where fish/no fish as simple as changing from a prince nymph to a hare nymph.

    AvatarTimberjunkies
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    Thank you guys for the great replies! this is what I wanted to happen everyone getting together giving tips and tricks to each other. Feel free to add anything else your experience and advice is greatly appreciated.

    Avatarradical
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    X2 on Pink Squirrels. Those things work on everything. I’ve caught Trout, Crappie, Bass, and Gills on that fly alone. I’m a casual Fly fisherman, enjoy mixing it up once in a while and fly fish. When I do fly fish, 95% of the time I’m using a Pink Squirrel.

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