Home Forums Fishing General Fishing Forum Entering Canada with a DUI

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  • bigbuck31ptbigbuck31pt
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    I have a friend in town from California and he’s leaving with his dad on Wednesday for Earl Falls, Ontario going through International Falls. He received a DUI in Cali within the last year and was unaware that he may have trouble getting in. I have heard stories of people being denied enterance into Canada with a DUI conviction. Is that still the case? Is there anything he can do at this point?

    Thanks.

    "In The Wind He's Still Alive" RIP Scott Ferris

    llewellinsetterllewellinsetter
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    Post count: 2514

    At this point I’d say smile and be polite as can be. There is some paperwork that can be filled out at the crossing but this will likely change everything about their trip. This is why I say good riddance to Canada and their laws.

    Sarcasm entails a few things: one of them is intellect, another one is a sense of humor, and a third - not taking things too personally.

    Avatardirtracer4
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    Post count: 53

    1st thing is to keep your mouth shut. :mrgreen:

    If he is found out at the border, he may be able to pay a one time fee just for this trip. My wife had to do that 12-13 years ago. Her DUI was 5-6 years before that. We had to pay $250 & they wanted to know where you were going & when you would be returning to the day. When we got home, she had to fill out forms & send another $250 or so to the Canadian consulate in Chicago for a lifetime waiver. We’ve both been going to Canada for years & never knew about that. Her mom has a cabin in northern Manitoba so we had to do something so she could continue to go. I have no idea what the rules are now, just going off of my experience. Just seems a little over the top to me, but then again we are visitors…
    Having said that, there still could be chance that they will just flat out turn him away at the border – like I said, don’t offer too much info & keep fingers crossed.

    bigbuck31ptbigbuck31pt
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    Quote by: llewellinsetter

    At this point I’d say smile and be polite as can be. There is some paperwork that can be filled out at the crossing but this will likely change everything about their trip. This is why I say good riddance to Canada and their laws.

    What do you mean by “but this will likely change everything about their trip”?

    "In The Wind He's Still Alive" RIP Scott Ferris

    Avatardirtracer4
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    I didn’t mean for you to keep your mouth shut Andy – I meant your buddy. (Well maybe you too. 😆 )

    bigbuck31ptbigbuck31pt
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    Quote by: dirtracer4

    I didn’t mean for you to keep your mouth shut Andy – I meant your buddy. (Well maybe you too. 😆 )

    Thanks Chad. 😆

    "In The Wind He's Still Alive" RIP Scott Ferris

    llewellinsetterllewellinsetter
    Blocked
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    Dirtracer summed it up well. If you have to go that route expect everything in your possession to be checked over and scrutinized and expect an extremely long delay.

    Sarcasm entails a few things: one of them is intellect, another one is a sense of humor, and a third - not taking things too personally.

    AvatarBigSling
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    Post count: 221

    A quick internet search revealed the following:
    Since your buddy’s DUI was within the last year, he “should” be able to pay a 1 time fee of $200 (Canadian) to receive a temporary resident permit. However, these only work for 1 entry and apparently only work if he did not serve jail time or has other charges on his record.

    If he plans to go regularly in the future, after 5 years years he can apply for “criminal rehabilitation”. After 10 years, he shouldn’t have to apply for anything and would be “deemed rehabilitated” but having some sort of documentation proving the case occurred that long ago could be handy.

    Avatarhacksaw
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    Post count: 1434

    Quote by: BigSling

    A quick internet search revealed the following:
    Since your buddy’s DUI was within the last year, he “should” be able to pay a 1 time fee of $200 (Canadian) to receive a temporary resident permit. However, these only work for 1 entry and apparently only work if he did not serve jail time or has other charges on his record.

    If he plans to go regularly in the future, after 5 years years he can apply for “criminal rehabilitation”. After 10 years, he shouldn’t have to apply for anything and would be “deemed rehabilitated” but having some sort of documentation proving the case occurred that long ago could be handy.

    That’s pretty much right on. The only thing I might add is that if your DUI is ten years old, check with the Attorney General’s Office to see if the offense is now off the records. Many aren’t taken off. In that case you need to have a Judge expunge the offense off your record.

    Avatarhacksaw
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    Post count: 1434

    Quote by: hacksaw

    Quote by: BigSling

    A quick internet search revealed the following:
    Since your buddy’s DUI was within the last year, he “should” be able to pay a 1 time fee of $200 (Canadian) to receive a temporary resident permit. However, these only work for 1 entry and apparently only work if he did not serve jail time or has other charges on his record.

    If he plans to go regularly in the future, after 5 years years he can apply for “criminal rehabilitation”. After 10 years, he shouldn’t have to apply for anything and would be “deemed rehabilitated” but having some sort of documentation proving the case occurred that long ago could be handy.

    That’s pretty much right on. The only thing I might add is that if your DUI is ten years old, check with the Attorney General’s Office to see if the offense is now off the records. Many aren’t taken off. In that case you need to have a Judge expunge the offense off your record.

    The other thing I might add is to let another person drive but don’t try to hide. Just sit next to the driver. Make sure the driver has crossed before and let him answer the questions he is asked only, noone else comment and he shouldn’t say antything beyond answering the question. This possible one time passage is an experiment with the Ontario province brought on by Tourism folks. If deemed successful in keeping non-resident alcohol related accidents it may be continued ? In Canada a DUI is considered a felony class offense different from the States. It was brought on much in part because of efforts by the MADD group, the same group that is having some success in the States. Just saw a C-Span presentation where it was told that there have been about 430,000 alcohol related motor vehicle deaths in the last 30 years with millions seriously injured. The recent lowering of the percent of alcohol in one person allowed on the water was reduced just this year. It may not be long before any alcohol on the water will be allowed because just some people can’t be responsible ? Just some thoughts. Oh, and Setter, maybe you can go fishing in Mexico where they probably have laws you agree with ? 😉

    IaCraigIaCraig
    Participant
    Post count: 1709

    2 Quick comments. First, if he isn’t driving and if they don’t drive his car, the chances are that they won’t check his record. But if they do be prepared that they might not give him the option to pay. So his fishing crew better be prepared to either all go home, or find him a way home. Second, Canada can also be very strict on beer in the boat, I believe their laws say none, even if the boat driver is not drinking. So if he does cross the border without hassle, but gets caught with beer in the boat and then they check his record and find the recent dui, it may get ugly.
    I wish them well, Ontario can be a blast.

    AvatarWalleyehunter16
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    Post count: 56

    Well follow up his his trip and get the story beause my guess is it willl be sme kind of mixture of the suggestions made in this thread.
    We took a friend probably 10 years ago , that had not had a DUI or been put in jail and it was the typical pay us $200, 3 hr border check.
    He had gotten into a fight at a bar and the two of them were taken to the cop shop. Neither were charged but it was in his record.
    Needless to say he did not have alot of cash on him at the time so his trip was a little less extravagant than the rest of us.
    Its a foreign country and they can pretty much do as they want and there’s not alot you can do about it.
    We haven’t been back since. Too many locals are outspoken against Americans visiting and “ruining their country”.
    It just got to where it wasn’t worth the hassle and cost.

    llewellinsetterllewellinsetter
    Blocked
    Post count: 2514

    Quote by: hacksaw
    Oh, and Setter, maybe you can go fishing in Mexico where they probably have laws you agree with ? 😉

    There always has to be one doesn’t there.

    Sarcasm entails a few things: one of them is intellect, another one is a sense of humor, and a third - not taking things too personally.

    AvatarWalleyehunter16
    Participant
    Post count: 56

    Quote by: hacksaw

    Quote by: hacksaw

    Quote by: BigSling

    A quick internet search revealed the following:
    Since your buddy’s DUI was within the last year, he “should” be able to pay a 1 time fee of $200 (Canadian) to receive a temporary resident permit. However, these only work for 1 entry and apparently only work if he did not serve jail time or has other charges on his record.

    If he plans to go regularly in the future, after 5 years years he can apply for “criminal rehabilitation”. After 10 years, he shouldn’t have to apply for anything and would be “deemed rehabilitated” but having some sort of documentation proving the case occurred that long ago could be handy.

    That’s pretty much right on. The only thing I might add is that if your DUI is ten years old, check with the Attorney General’s Office to see if the offense is now off the records. Many aren’t taken off. In that case you need to have a Judge expunge the offense off your record.

    The other thing I might add is to let another person drive but don’t try to hide. Just sit next to the driver. Make sure the driver has crossed before and let him answer the questions he is asked only, noone else comment and he shouldn’t say antything beyond answering the question. This possible one time passage is an experiment with the Ontario province brought on by Tourism folks. If deemed successful in keeping non-resident alcohol related accidents it may be continued ? In Canada a DUI is considered a felony class offense different from the States. It was brought on much in part because of efforts by the MADD group, the same group that is having some success in the States. Just saw a C-Span presentation where it was told that there have been about 430,000 alcohol related motor vehicle deaths in the last 30 years with millions seriously injured. The recent lowering of the percent of alcohol in one person allowed on the water was reduced just this year. It may not be long before any alcohol on the water will be allowed because just some people can’t be responsible ? Just some thoughts. Oh, and Setter, maybe you can go fishing in Mexico where they probably have laws you agree with ? 😉

    The Provinces of Canada can have any rule they want. It doesn’t mean we have to like it or agree with it.
    I have enjoyed my visits there but the fact remains you are treated like a crimnal and many of the locals are not accomodating to Americans. Your experiences may be different but I’ve been there enough times to have a good sample from Ontario and Manitoba.

    AvatarDeadBird
    Participant
    Post count: 1497

    Had a long reponse to that last thread but just a few words…….good people and bad, just like here, and I feel treated like a criminal a lot in the US so how difefrent are the laws? See some pretty screwed up laws here too………

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