Home Forums Fishing Fly Fishing Dropper Flies

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  • AvatarNaiveNative
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    Hello – Recently i have been reading about using a dry fly in tandem with a wet fly when trout fishing. I have yet to try this technique, but have a couple questions.

    1. I was not able to find any regulations that say you cannot use two hooks with artificial lures when fly fishing for trout in Iowa. Anyone know differently?

    2. Anyone tried this technique?

    3. If so, what is your go-to combo?

    The setup i would most like to try out is a caddis fly with a bead head nymph or a caddis larva tied on about 18-24 inches below. I have heard that not only does this double your presentation, the dry fly acts as a great strike indicator for the wet fly. I have heard that all you have to do is tie another bit of leader onto the bend of the dry fly.

    Avatardjo
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    To quote our friends at the DNR
    “Hooks
    When fishing by hook and line you cannot use more than two lines or more than two hooks on each line when still fishing or trolling. When fly fishing, you cannot use more than two flies on one line.”

    So you are fine with a two fly rig. I used to fish rigs like this all the time. They work very well. They also are a pain in the neck to cast. The two flies tend to windmilll around each other and pull the cast off line. Also you need to open your loop during the cast in order not to have the flies tangle each other. That makes the cast much more sensitive to gusts of wind. All in all kind of a pain but a very effective way to catch fish. I often think that the trout move to examine the dry fly and then grab the dropper instead. You will want to vary the length of your line connecting the dropper to your dry fly and see what works best. Many times an unweighted nymph a foot or so below the dry will float just below the water film and work great. If the line to the dropper is too short you will have more trouble foul hooking trout.

    The top fly needs to be buoyant enough to not be pulled under by the nymph. An old time favorite is to use a hopper – hence the name hopper – dropper rig. I usually use an elk hair caddis – say size 12 or 14 – or an Adams of about the same size. I tied these specially with extra elk hair or hackle to encourage them to float better and then doctored them up with paste floatant. My dropper was often a smaller (size 16 or 18) bead head hare’s ear nymph or the local favorite pink squirrel. Normally I made the dropper line one size lighter than the regular tippet so if the fly snagged I would only lose the nymph. If for example the tippet to the dry fly was a #4 the line to the nymph would be a #5 or #6.

    Some folks tie the dropper line from the eye of the dry fly. Most people simply tie the dropper line off the bend of the dry fly hook. I like to rig up a few of these dry – dropper outfits at home and take them to the stream wrapped around a bit of stiff foam (water pipe insulation works fine). That way you do not have to tie up a full rig while standing in the middle of a river. The dry fly does act as a drift indicator The only issue there is that it is a pain to change the depth of the nymph with this system as you have to change the whole dropper line. I did come across this method for tying dry fly that would allow you to adjust the depth of your dropper but have never tried it (https://winonaflyfactory.wordpress.com/2009/08/02/the-hoppicator/
    ).

    David

    AvatarNaiveNative
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    Quote by: djo

    To quote our friends at the DNR
    “Hooks
    When fishing by hook and line you cannot use more than two lines or more than two hooks on each line when still fishing or trolling. When fly fishing, you cannot use more than two flies on one line.”

    So you are fine with a two fly rig. I used to fish rigs like this all the time. They work very well. They also are a pain in the neck to cast. The two flies tend to windmilll around each other and pull the cast off line. Also you need to open your loop during the cast in order not to have the flies tangle each other. That makes the cast much more sensitive to gusts of wind. All in all kind of a pain but a very effective way to catch fish. I often think that the trout move to examine the dry fly and then grab the dropper instead. You will want to vary the length of your line connecting the dropper to your dry fly and see what works best. Many times an unweighted nymph a foot or so below the dry will float just below the water film and work great. If the line to the dropper is too short you will have more trouble foul hooking trout.

    The top fly needs to be buoyant enough to not be pulled under by the nymph. An old time favorite is to use a hopper – hence the name hopper – dropper rig. I usually use an elk hair caddis – say size 12 or 14 – or an Adams of about the same size. I tied these specially with extra elk hair or hackle to encourage them to float better and then doctored them up with paste floatant. My dropper was often a smaller (size 16 or 18) bead head hare’s ear nymph or the local favorite pink squirrel. Normally I made the dropper line one size lighter than the regular tippet so if the fly snagged I would only lose the nymph. If for example the tippet to the dry fly was a #4 the line to the nymph would be a #5 or #6.

    Some folks tie the dropper line from the eye of the dry fly. Most people simply tie the dropper line off the bend of the dry fly hook. I like to rig up a few of these dry – dropper outfits at home and take them to the stream wrapped around a bit of stiff foam (water pipe insulation works fine). That way you do not have to tie up a full rig while standing in the middle of a river. The dry fly does act as a drift indicator The only issue there is that it is a pain to change the depth of the nymph with this system as you have to change the whole dropper line. I did come across this method for tying dry fly that would allow you to adjust the depth of your dropper but have never tried it (https://winonaflyfactory.wordpress.com/2009/08/02/the-hoppicator/
    ).

    David

    Great info – Thanks!!!

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