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  • AvatarBullfrogMcGee
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    thought I would try it, what the heck – tastes delicious! Pieces of course were simply filleted off of each side of the breast, then I used a meat mallet (smooth side) to flatten out.

    Soy sauce
    Worcester sauce
    Liquid smoke
    Brown sugar

    marinate over night, I pat dry and then heavy with fresh ground black pepper. Into the dehydrator until desired dryness, easy and tasty!

    Avatarbeniah1066
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    Quote by: BullfrogMcGee

    thought I would try it, what the heck – tastes delicious! Pieces of course were simply filleted off of each side of the breast, then I used a meat mallet (smooth side) to flatten out.

    Soy sauce
    Worcester sauce
    Liquid smoke
    Brown sugar

    marinate over night, I pat dry and then heavy with fresh ground black pepper. Into the dehydrator until desired dryness, easy and tasty!

    What was the thickness would you say of what you were filleting off, prior to flattening?

    AvatarTeamAsgrow
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    Blasphemy!

    AvatarTrapCyclone
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    IMO bacon-wrapped dove breast is pretty dang good. Here’s a sample recipe where it is wrapped with cream cheese and a slice of jalapeño.

    https://www.sportsmansnews.com/2012/08/cooking-it-wild-bacon-wrapped-dove/

    AvatarTeamAsgrow
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    Here is my take on wild game cookery. Yes jerk and poppers are great. If that gets you to eat what you shoot, great. I like to let the game animal shine. I prepare it so it is the centerpiece flavor, not covered up with other heavy flavors to mask what it tastes like. Proper cooking methods to the correct temp help immensely. Recipes by Steven Rinella and Hank Shaw seem to exemplify this through process. I encourage all to explore some recipes beyond just adding a piece of meat to a dish to get rid of the game, celebrate it’s flavor.

    End of rant, flame me

    Avatarspeng5
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    While I’m not THAT adventurous with game meat relatively speaking, I am more so that way with fish. I’m probably a blasphemer for my opinion but I think fried fish gets old and is tasteless (the inner meat, not the breading) compared to other recipes. Sure we all love the taste of Shore Lunch breading but who can honestly tell what the fish is inside? I’d wager as long as the fish are relatively simlilar, like walleye and crappie, many could not tell one breaded nugget from the other if cut in uniform cubes. Recently I’ve finally been blessed by the fishing gods and gotten into some walleye and let me tell you it is fantastic grilled and broiled. Anymore the only fish that goes 100% in the fryer is catfish but even so I am in the process of looking up some recipes for having it baked.

    If you ask me dove are too good for jerky. Jerky for me is reserved for tough old bucks, geese, and other more undesirables. But like Asgrow points out if that is what gets you and yours eating more wild game, it’s a good deal. I will concede that some of the super bacon’d out, super marinated or breaded stuff is good for introducing non hunters to wild game. Not everyone is going to appreciate a minimally seasoned, rare-ish duck breast off the grill. But most can appreciate it cubed up and put in chili.

    AvatarTeamAsgrow
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    Fish I can take or leave. If FamilyAsgrow keeps fish, we fry it. But it all boils down to eating what you keep. I am not a huge fan of gifting away all of your fish and game meat. I understand giving some to family or friends that enjoy it but do not get out and collect their own. BUT giving away everything and not saving some for your own table doesn’t sit well with me, why keep a limit of walleyes if you dont care for fish? Game animals upsets me even more, why even bother deer hunting if you are going to give the whole animal away?

    Once again, my own standing, if you trophy hunt and hush a deer or give it to someone who will eat it that is your stance. Do as you please.

    IaCraigIaCraig
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    Glad the jerky worked well for you, thanks for sharing and good job in using it in a way that you enjoyed it.

    Now that I am older, preparing game meat is almost as much fun as harvesting it. Almost….. 😆 And something about taking home-made jerky, sausage or even a cold duck sandwich for a sack lunch on your next hunting trip makes it even more rewarding. I go a bit to the extremes to use the “whole critter”, but that is just how I was raised. If I wasn’t married there would be a lot more variety of wild game and foraged fruit & veggies on the dinner table in my household. :mrgreen:

    AvatarBullfrogMcGee
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    Quote by: beniah1066

    Quote by: BullfrogMcGee

    thought I would try it, what the heck – tastes delicious! Pieces of course were simply filleted off of each side of the breast, then I used a meat mallet (smooth side) to flatten out.

    Soy sauce
    Worcester sauce
    Liquid smoke
    Brown sugar

    marinate over night, I pat dry and then heavy with fresh ground black pepper. Into the dehydrator until desired dryness, easy and tasty!

    What was the thickness would you say of what you were filleting off, prior to flattening?

    Not very thick to begin with, but I didn’t measure them. You could probably dry as is if one wanted to.

    AvatarBullfrogMcGee
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    Quote by: TeamAsgrow

    Here is my take on wild game cookery. Yes jerk and poppers are great. If that gets you to eat what you shoot, great. I like to let the game animal shine. I prepare it so it is the centerpiece flavor, not covered up with other heavy flavors to mask what it tastes like. Proper cooking methods to the correct temp help immensely. Recipes by Steven Rinella and Hank Shaw seem to exemplify this through process. I encourage all to explore some recipes beyond just adding a piece of meat to a dish to get rid of the game, celebrate it’s flavor.

    End of rant, flame me

    Haha! Don’t mind or care one way or the other, I am just happy as heck to get the chance to hunt and harvest some game! Experimenting with cooking game is a lot of fun too!

    Ask me what my favorite beer is, and I will tell you “cold”! 😆

    AvatarTeamAsgrow
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    Quote by: BullfrogMcGee

    Quote by: TeamAsgrow

    Here is my take on wild game cookery. Yes jerk and poppers are great. If that gets you to eat what you shoot, great. I like to let the game animal shine. I prepare it so it is the centerpiece flavor, not covered up with other heavy flavors to mask what it tastes like. Proper cooking methods to the correct temp help immensely. Recipes by Steven Rinella and Hank Shaw seem to exemplify this through process. I encourage all to explore some recipes beyond just adding a piece of meat to a dish to get rid of the game, celebrate it’s flavor.

    End of rant, flame me

    Haha! Don’t mind or care one way or the other, I am just happy as heck to get the chance to hunt and harvest some game! Experimenting with cooking game is a lot of fun too!

    Ask me what my favorite beer is, and I will tell you “cold”! 😆

    Free beer is my fave!

    Avatarkenhump
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    Quote by: speng5

    While I’m not THAT adventurous with game meat relatively speaking, I am more so that way with fish. I’m probably a blasphemer for my opinion but I think fried fish gets old and is tasteless (the inner meat, not the breading) compared to other recipes. Sure we all love the taste of Shore Lunch breading but who can honestly tell what the fish is inside? I’d wager as long as the fish are relatively simlilar, like walleye and crappie, many could not tell one breaded nugget from the other if cut in uniform cubes. Recently I’ve finally been blessed by the fishing gods and gotten into some walleye and let me tell you it is fantastic grilled and broiled. Anymore the only fish that goes 100% in the fryer is catfish but even so I am in the process of looking up some recipes for having it baked.

    If you ask me dove are too good for jerky. Jerky for me is reserved for tough old bucks, geese, and other more undesirables. But like Asgrow points out if that is what gets you and yours eating more wild game, it’s a good deal. I will concede that some of the super bacon’d out, super marinated or breaded stuff is good for introducing non hunters to wild game. Not everyone is going to appreciate a minimally seasoned, rare-ish duck breast off the grill. But most can appreciate it cubed up and put in chili.

    Blackened catfish
    Ingredients

    2 tablespoons paprika

    1 tablespoon salt

    2 teaspoons onion powder

    2 teaspoons garlic powder

    1 1/2 teaspoons ground black pepper

    1 1/2 teaspoons ground white pepper

    1 teaspoon dried thyme

    1 teaspoon dried oregano

    2 teaspoons cayenne pepper

    1 1/2 cups butter, melted

    4 (6 ounce) catfish filets

    Directions

    1. Mix paprika, salt, onion powder, garlic powder, black pepper, white pepper, thyme,

    oregano and cayenne pepper together in a small bowl.

    2. Heat a large cast iron frying pan over high heat til hot.

    3. Dip fish fillets into melted butter and sprinkle each fillet generously with the seasoning mixture.

    Place the fish fillets in the frying pan. Pour 1 tablespoon of butter over each

    fillet. Cook until the underside of the fillet looks charred (3 to 5 minutes). Flip the fish

    over, pour another tablespoon of butter over the fish and cook briefly (2 minutes).

    Drum or snapper work will also.

    Avatarmaxx
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    I agree you can fry a turd and it would take good but that doesn’t stop me from frying fish.

    I have started to expand my cooking on wild game. I do a lot of smoking with a reverse sear. Something about it is delicious. I really like finding different ways to use meat. I always have canned deer meat available. If my last one runs out I typically get more going. It is nice and easy for a busy family.

    Sometimes you still have to wrap some stuff in bacon though. Last new years I rolled out a backstrap stuffed it with cheese and sausage and rolled it up with bacon on the outside and tossed it in the smoker. That may have been one of the finer pieces of meat I have prepared.

    Avatarspeng5
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    Quote by: kenhump

    Quote by: speng5

    While I’m not THAT adventurous with game meat relatively speaking, I am more so that way with fish. I’m probably a blasphemer for my opinion but I think fried fish gets old and is tasteless (the inner meat, not the breading) compared to other recipes. Sure we all love the taste of Shore Lunch breading but who can honestly tell what the fish is inside? I’d wager as long as the fish are relatively simlilar, like walleye and crappie, many could not tell one breaded nugget from the other if cut in uniform cubes. Recently I’ve finally been blessed by the fishing gods and gotten into some walleye and let me tell you it is fantastic grilled and broiled. Anymore the only fish that goes 100% in the fryer is catfish but even so I am in the process of looking up some recipes for having it baked.

    If you ask me dove are too good for jerky. Jerky for me is reserved for tough old bucks, geese, and other more undesirables. But like Asgrow points out if that is what gets you and yours eating more wild game, it’s a good deal. I will concede that some of the super bacon’d out, super marinated or breaded stuff is good for introducing non hunters to wild game. Not everyone is going to appreciate a minimally seasoned, rare-ish duck breast off the grill. But most can appreciate it cubed up and put in chili.

    Blackened catfish
    Ingredients

    2 tablespoons paprika

    1 tablespoon salt

    2 teaspoons onion powder

    2 teaspoons garlic powder

    1 1/2 teaspoons ground black pepper

    1 1/2 teaspoons ground white pepper

    1 teaspoon dried thyme

    1 teaspoon dried oregano

    2 teaspoons cayenne pepper

    1 1/2 cups butter, melted

    4 (6 ounce) catfish filets

    Directions

    1. Mix paprika, salt, onion powder, garlic powder, black pepper, white pepper, thyme,

    oregano and cayenne pepper together in a small bowl.

    2. Heat a large cast iron frying pan over high heat til hot.

    3. Dip fish fillets into melted butter and sprinkle each fillet generously with the seasoning mixture.

    Place the fish fillets in the frying pan. Pour 1 tablespoon of butter over each

    fillet. Cook until the underside of the fillet looks charred (3 to 5 minutes). Flip the fish

    over, pour another tablespoon of butter over the fish and cook briefly (2 minutes).

    Drum or snapper work will also.

    Hey ken thanks for the recipe! That definitely sounds good and I’ll be looking to try it should I get any catfish soon. Wish I knew about this recipe a few days ago, while walleye fishing I thought I may have hooked a 30″ ‘eye, and turns out it was a huge drum 👿 👿 Didn’t want to grill or fry it so back it went, but this recipe sounds like it would have worked well. I don’t think drum is a horrible eating fish, and a recipe like this seems like it would really make it tasty.

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