Home Forums Hunting Deer Hunting Debatable Baiting?

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  • Avatardartsportsteve
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    So – I was talking to a gentleman about hunting the other night and Late Muzzy season came up. He told me that the best luck they have is hunting a field with a 3rd crop round bale placed in the middle of it. I told him that sounded like baiting to me and that the DNR wouldn’t ignore it if they discovered it. His claim was that it no different than “storing” a round bale in the field.

    Now I also know people who use round bales as blinds or near their bale blinds. Has anybody ever had a discussion with a CO about this? I’m just curious where the line is drawn.

    AvatarTrapCyclone
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    What exactly is a “3rd crop round bale”? Do you mean a hay bale?

    Avatardartsportsteve
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    Yes, basically the newest hay available for Late Muzzy season.

    Avatariowavf
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    He must have different deer than around my dad’s place because the deer will bed by the row of bales, but I’ve yet to see where they eat much of them.

    Avatardartsportsteve
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    So if his claim is true and the deer are eating the bale, would it be baiting?

    Avataraaronm
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    That is s tough one…I am guessing the DNR would write a ticket and let the courts decide. I can see it both ways…Non Baiting Side: If the hunters are simply hunting a harvested field, with bales still present, much like hunting a recently picked soybean or cornfield. Baiting Side: If it is a bale that is placed into a field for deer to consume and the hunter to shoot the deer its baiting plain and simple.

    Do deer even eat hay bales?

    AvatarTin Roof
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    I’ll bite.
    If he is purposely putting the round bale there to draw the deer into his shooting range, then yes it is baiting in my opinion. It would be no different than dumping a bushel of corn in the woods within range of your tree stand.

    Avatardartsportsteve
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    Quote by: Tin+Roof

    I’ll bite.
    If he is purposely putting the round bale there to draw the deer into his shooting range, then yes it is baiting in my opinion. It would be no different than dumping a bushel of corn in the woods within range of your tree stand.

    This was my opinion too, especially if there is evidence to prove it is placed for that reason. It would be hard to prosecute in court if there wasn’t hard evidence or a statement saying it was specifically placed to draw deer in though.

    Avataraaronm
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    Quote by: dartsportsteve

    Quote by: Tin+Roof

    I’ll bite.
    If he is purposely putting the round bale there to draw the deer into his shooting range, then yes it is baiting in my opinion. It would be no different than dumping a bushel of corn in the woods within range of your tree stand.

    This was my opinion too, especially if there is evidence to prove it is placed for that reason. It would be hard to prosecute in court if there wasn’t hard evidence or a statement saying it was specifically placed to draw deer in though.

    Does he hunt in a field with hay bales all over or does he place a hay bail in a field?

    AvatarTeamAsgrow
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    Here would be the rub with me. Is the bale in the field where it was harvested? If the bail is hay or alfalfa or anything for that matter and it is hauled into a bean field then I would consider it baiting.
    If the bails were moved to an area to store them over the winter and the hunter set up on them, I would say that is part of an agricultural practice and would not be baiting.

    Avatartrout killer
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    If he isn’t hunting a hay field this isn’t a gray area at all. If it is and that bale was not let there from the just cutting it is pretty cute and dried to .

    Plus I’ve never witnessed deer eat hay bales.

    Avatarflyfishr
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    If the bale was in the field from normal agricultural activity such as mowing, raking and then baling the hay not a problem. But if this field was not a hay field or a area in the field where bales are stored then the DNR would be raising their eyebrows on the reason it was placed there.

    OldbearOldbear
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    You didn’t say if it was used as bait or as a blind but I assume from the title its for feed. IMO the burden of proof would be on the prosecution as it was just one bale that wasn’t picked up and no one is going to admit it was left for that purpose. If its out in the middle of the field I don’t know where the hunter would place himself.

    Mayor of Hickory Grove

    AvatarTin Roof
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    To stir the pot a little, what about paying a farmer to leave a few rows of corn along where your stand or blind is? Does that fall under the category of a food plot, or if you pay to have it left there even though it was planted for agricultural purposes, is it now baiting?

    As far as deer eating round bales of hay, I’ve seen them do quite a number on some but that was only when the snow was so deep they didn’t have much choice.

    IaCraigIaCraig
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    I don’t know if a CO would try to pinch him or not. But my guess is yes that if he places the bale there to attract deer instead of intending to use it as a blind, it is baiting.

    But….. I also understand his reasoning. If there is no difference between hunting over food plots planted to specificlly attract deer vs hunting over a farmers late beans or alfalfa field or apple orchard etc, then why would there be a difference between hunting over a round bale placed there to attract deer and hunting over a round bale which the farmer stores in the field until he needs it.

    I bet the courts make a distinction, even if he doesn’t.

    Avatardartsportsteve
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    Quote by: TeamAsgrow

    Here would be the rub with me. Is the bale in the field where it was harvested? If the bail is hay or alfalfa or anything for that matter and it is hauled into a bean field then I would consider it baiting.
    If the bails were moved to an area to store them over the winter and the hunter set up on them, I would say that is part of an agricultural practice and would not be baiting.

    The way he described it was that the bale is specifically placed in the field for late muzzy season. The field is a corn/bean field – not hay.

    Avatarjlarson
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    Quote by: aaronm

    That is s tough one…I am guessing the DNR would write a ticket and let the courts decide. I can see it both ways…Non Baiting Side: If the hunters are simply hunting a harvested field, with bales still present, much like hunting a recently picked soybean or cornfield. Baiting Side: If it is a bale that is placed into a field for deer to consume and the hunter to shoot the deer its baiting plain and simple.

    Do deer even eat hay bales?

    . Have friends who put small squares out in winter to feed and collect sheds

    AvatarDGorman
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    where I hunt there is a strip of crp about 75 yards wide between the house and the timber. The landowner lines up his round bales behind the shed and you can see the highway of deer tracks from the timber up to those bales in the snow. It’s all after dark activity, most likely since it’s so close to the house, but they definitely will eat hay. If they put a round bale in the middle of a cornfield it’s baiting without a doubt. Whether the deer come to eat it or not, the intent is to draw them into that field with food that wasn’t grown there.

    OldbearOldbear
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    Quote by: dartsportsteve

    Quote by: TeamAsgrow

    Here would be the rub with me. Is the bale in the field where it was harvested? If the bail is hay or alfalfa or anything for that matter and it is hauled into a bean field then I would consider it baiting.
    If the bails were moved to an area to store them over the winter and the hunter set up on them, I would say that is part of an agricultural practice and would not be baiting.

    The way he described it was that the bale is specifically placed in the field for late muzzy season. The field is a corn/bean field – not hay.

    That being the case its baiting IMO.

    Mayor of Hickory Grove

    Avataraaronm
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    Quote by: dartsportsteve

    Quote by: TeamAsgrow

    Here would be the rub with me. Is the bale in the field where it was harvested? If the bail is hay or alfalfa or anything for that matter and it is hauled into a bean field then I would consider it baiting.
    If the bails were moved to an area to store them over the winter and the hunter set up on them, I would say that is part of an agricultural practice and would not be baiting.

    The way he described it was that the bale is specifically placed in the field for late muzzy season. The field is a corn/bean field – not hay.

    That would be baiting…pretty cut and dry. People get caught up trying to make something appear right or it is the argument that it is “no different than……”. Bottom line if you are hunting over a substance that is not within normal agricultural practices you are susceptible to being ticketed for baiting.

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