Home Forums Fishing Catfishing Cut Bait

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  • AvatarDrop_Tine5214
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    Post count: 534

    Do any of you ever “marinate” your cut bait with anything to make it smellier or more attractive? Had a guy tell me that he puts cut bluegill chunks in zip lock baggies with a tiny bit of vegetable oil and garlic salt and lets it soak for a few days before using it and swears it works great. I’m curious of anyone else has ever done anything like this.

    AvatarBuckFever86
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    Post count: 44

    I’ve used the garlic soak before with some success. I haven’t done it since kus my wife couldn’t handle the smell on the boat!

    oldstylelightoldstylelight
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    Post count: 1943

    Quote by: Drop_Tine5214

    Do any of you ever “marinate” your cut bait with anything to make it smellier or more attractive? Had a guy tell me that he puts cut bluegill chunks in zip lock baggies with a tiny bit of vegetable oil and garlic salt and lets it soak for a few days before using it and swears it works great. I’m curious of anyone else has ever done anything like this.

    In a nutshell, you can catch a catfish on about anything…. The question is, which one is better? The answer is not some secret recipe, nor is it the gear that guys like to give credit to (which is mostly a bunch of crap in catfishing). It comes down to one thing. Fresh bait can’t be beat. Hands down. If you want to debate that, enter a tournament and try to win it with a “secret recipe.”

    OldbearOldbear
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    Post count: 2794

    I use green sunfish cut bait and I have tried it with garlic, vanilla and anise oil. Don’t really see any difference as they bite when they’re hungary.

    Mayor of Hickory Grove

    IaCraigIaCraig
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    Post count: 1709

    This should be interesting. People have a huge variety of favorite concoctions, many include setting out in the hot sun until it stinks so bad it would make a dog puke. (I avoid all of those)

    My favorite is 2-3 big minnows squashed @ hooked through the head with 1 live one with lots of wiggle put on last. I often also try a rod with chicken livers, sometimes they seem to be what the catfish want.

    Avatarjnrbronc
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    Post count: 234

    WAY back in junior high school, a class mate talked about cutting a carp into chunks, packing it in a quart jar, cover with water and a little salt. Put a lid on loosely and place it in the sun for a couple of days. I think I might have tried it ONCE, must not have had good luck as I didn’t continue using it.

    Last few years I’ve been testing a couple of different dip baits. Doc’s and Sonny’s come to mind, as both are Iowa made/packaged. I’ve got a couple of other tubs that I forget who made them. They all seem to catch fish, some doing slightly better on one day versus the other, but no hands down winner.

    I was contemplating doing a little catfishing before reading this thread, might have to seriously consider sitting by the pond tonight. 😉

    AvatarRedRock
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    Post count: 37

    Just thinking about some of the stuff we used/tried makes my eyes water. Homemade stink baits that usually ended up so bad a gas mask should have been required! I’ve bought many no name, big name, and so on brands of stink baits over the years and they’re mild. Soaking cut bait chunks in stink baits was not uncommon. A jar and some sun stewing chum made of fish, soy beans, flour, livers, and anything else we could find in jars until it was ripe, then add flour for consistency. Did it ever stink. I remember some old relatives making dough ball baits when I was a wee little tike and it was just as horrid as the sun baked stuff we tried when teens.

    These days I just use live or fresh baits. Chubs, minnows, leaches, shad, and so on are on the top of my lists. Not saying the foul smell of rotted beans, fish, and so on doesn’t work; I just don’t want to smell it anymore. Catch rate between the two…Probably equal. When it comes to cats they’ll eat anything when hungry. locations never seemed to matter as we used the same baits on the Des MOines as we did on the Skunk, or on Red Rock.

    bowfisherbowfisher
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    Post count: 2207

    Quote by: oldstylelight

    Quote by: Drop_Tine5214

    Do any of you ever “marinate” your cut bait with anything to make it smellier or more attractive? Had a guy tell me that he puts cut bluegill chunks in zip lock baggies with a tiny bit of vegetable oil and garlic salt and lets it soak for a few days before using it and swears it works great. I’m curious of anyone else has ever done anything like this.

    In a nutshell, you can catch a catfish on about anything…. The question is, which one is better? The answer is not some secret recipe, nor is it the gear that guys like to give credit to (which is mostly a bunch of crap in catfishing). It comes down to one thing. Fresh bait can’t be beat. Hands down. If you want to debate that, enter a tournament and try to win it with a “secret recipe.”

    In my experience, oldstylelight hits the nail squarely on the head. I have never had the success with any prepared bait than I do with freshly caught bait. Des Moines River, South Skunk, Red Rock lake are my primary go to’s.

    AvatarVScott
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    Post count: 48

    Fresh cut bait is the only way to go, no doubt about it.

    Avatarkithkat
    Participant
    Post count: 563

    I try to use fresh whenever I can, but if I plan on storing bait beyond the day I catch it then I season it with a little salt and garlic powder.

    Avatarskunkboy
    Participant
    Post count: 1399

    Quote by: bowfisher

    Quote by: oldstylelight

    Quote by: Drop_Tine5214

    Do any of you ever “marinate” your cut bait with anything to make it smellier or more attractive? Had a guy tell me that he puts cut bluegill chunks in zip lock baggies with a tiny bit of vegetable oil and garlic salt and lets it soak for a few days before using it and swears it works great. I’m curious of anyone else has ever done anything like this.

    In a nutshell, you can catch a catfish on about anything…. The question is, which one is better? The answer is not some secret recipe, nor is it the gear that guys like to give credit to (which is mostly a bunch of crap in catfishing). It comes down to one thing. Fresh bait can’t be beat. Hands down. If you want to debate that, enter a tournament and try to win it with a “secret recipe.”

    In my experience, oldstylelight hits the nail squarely on the head. I have never had the success with any prepared bait than I do with freshly caught bait. Des Moines River, South Skunk, Red Rock lake are my primary go to’s.

    Bravo. There’s the answer. I’ll only add that if you are interested in 4-5 pound or less catfish (some great table fare BTW), your ‘stinky’ baits work well. Bigger catfish are more predators than scavengers…smaller cats are more scavenger that predator. That does not mean bigger cats won’t eat ‘stinky’ stuff, just that your chances are much greater with FRESH CUT bait.

    L8R…Ken

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