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  • Avatariowaterfowler
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    Post count: 225

    There talking dove hunting again, I hope it has a different outcome then 2001
    http://www.kwqc.com/Global/story.asp?S=9808266&nav=menu83_2_5here

    Avatarcghoerichs
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    Post count: 7

    Contact your legislators. They need to know that we support dove hunting and are motivated enough to call.

    Avatariowaterfowler
    Participant
    Post count: 225

    I may have messed up, did I post this in the wrong forum? Aren’t doves considered a migratory bird???
    I’ve never hunted them, sorry for my lack of knowledge.

    Avatariowaterfowler
    Participant
    Post count: 225

    Oh Boy here we go, “they help farmers by eating weed seeds” I wonder what he thinks happens when they drop a deuce. All the seeds are completely digestested never to be seen again 🙄 🙄 🙄 This is just another way weeds are spread, what a guy 😡
    http://www.kwqc.com/Global/story.asp?S=9813623&nav=menu83_2_3here

    AvatarNreising
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    Post count: 124

    I heard on the radio this morning that it is not looking good.

    Avatarolie
    Participant
    Post count: 646

    i just sent in my email of support, lets go guys!!

    AvatarKidIcarus
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    Post count: 258

    I guess I need someone to tell me why dove hunting would be good.

    At this point I can’t say one way or the other. Are they good eating, are they a nuisance?

    AvatarMitty3
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    Post count: 84

    A dove season would be another way to get our children off the couch and outdoors. Period.

    Avatarpinny
    Participant
    Post count: 1012

    KidIcaris,

    They are both a nuisance and good eating in my opinion. But they are also beautiful and a song bird in other peoples opinion.

    This would bring up the states revenue by getting more hunters to hunt in state. Plus the shell sales, which if you have ever watched a dove fly, they are not the easiest bird to shoot at.

    MyDogCarlMyDogCarl
    Participant
    Post count: 251

    Quote by: KidIcarus

    I guess I need someone to tell me why dove hunting would be good.

    At this point I can’t say one way or the other. Are they good eating, are they a nuisance?

    Here are a few reasons…

    Hunting migratory birds is a legitimate activity under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, where doves, waterfowl, and other birds are listed as game birds.

    Currently doves are hunted in 40 states, including every state that borders Iowa, jointly managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and state wildlife agencies.

    Doves are the most abundant game birds in North America, and have a stable healthy population with an estimated fall population of 475 million birds.

    The breeding range extends from central Canada in the north to southern Mexico in the south and encompasses all of the lower 48 states.

    Professional wildlife biologists (federal, state, universities) manage migratory birds as renewable resources, regulated by surveys and scientific methods.

    Research has shown that when properly regulated, hunting has no significant impact on dove population trends. Also, research has indicated that dove hunting does not adversely impact nesting

    Dove hunting is highly regulated. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, which oversees migratory birds, regulates dove hunting and sets bag limits and season lengths. The service sets regulations the same way it does with ducks and geese and other migratory birds � through population monitoring and studies. Breeding populations have been monitored nationwide since 1966

    Migratory bird hunting provides wildlife recreation to tens of thousands of participants, contributing millions of dollars to habitat conservation and management and local economies.

    The natural mortality rate for mourning doves is high; approximately 6 out of 10 birds do not survive from one year to the next. Research indicates that mourning dove mortality is caused by a variety of factors including predators, disease, accidents, hunting and weather extremes. Nationwide, approximately 41 million doves are harvested annually. Other sources of mortality are 4-5 times higher than hunting mortality.

    The Mourning Dove (Zenaida macroura) is a member of the pigeon family (Columbidae), it is similar to the common pigeon but is more uniformly gray with a pointed tail instead of a blunt-tipped tail. It is not the biblical ‘bird of peace’. The turtledove holds that distinction, which is native to the Mediterranean region, not North America

    Doves are excellent table fare.

    Urban doves are not susceptible to hunting, as many opponents claim. A three-year study conducted by the Ohio Department of Natural Resources and Clemson University showed that less than 1 percent of the doves killed came from urban areas.

    Mourning doves do not mate for life.
    They mate for one season. Because they live on average for only 1 to 1.5 years, they may in fact have only one mate. However, those doves that return to nest a second time do not necessarily have the same mate.

    Doves are not a songbird.
    Not even the National Audubon Society classifies the mourning dove as a songbird. They are classified in the dove and pigeon category

    AvatarKidIcarus
    Participant
    Post count: 258

    If it tastes good and it can maintain a proper population with hunting, why not.

    Sounds like a good shoot to me, another thing to try. Don’t really know if I myself would ever dedicate time to hunting them.

    Nonetheless is sounds like the only reason to not have a season is because they have something pretty about them. Though that wwould leave much to hunt if that was the basis for everything.

    Avatarshaley
    Participant
    Post count: 2568

    I hunted them when I lived in PA, its like a holiday there for opener. They are about the hardest thing to try and drop out of the sky to, man they can move. When I was asked to tag along I asked my buddy what to bring, he said 4 boxes of shells and 2 guns if you got them. I thought he was joking, he wasn’t. 4 boxes didn’t get me to noon and I only had 6 bird but it was fun.

    Avatariowaterfowler
    Participant
    Post count: 225

    A friend of mine that hunts them in Illinois got ahold of me when he was grilling some up last year, they didn’t last long, Very good eating.
    I live on a farm thats thick with them to say the least, they’re strung up and down the power lines all over my area. Theres a cedar tree in my front yard that consistantly holds over twenty doves at any given time, its not uncommon to see as many as fifty in a morning sit on the deck. It doesn’t help that I have a Lab from Texas that was raised on dove hunting, I get the most confused disgusting looks from her when she watches them fly by.

    I would love to see this finaly go through…

    Does anyone have any contact info. on local legislators so we can give this a push???

    Sorry feathhd, I just looked farther down the page and found your post. Had I opened my eyes a little wider I would have just added to your post My fault.

    Avatarkenhump
    Participant
    Post count: 12770

    They are a bird that will humble many good wing shooters. Hardest thing I’ve ever hunted with a scattergun. 😳

    AvatarBeamerBoy
    Participant
    Post count: 245

    Best reason to hunt them here is that A LOT of us go elsewhere to hunt them, taking A LOT of money with us out of the state.

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