Home Forums Hunting Waterfowling Cranes

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  • Avatarorngruffee
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    Post count: 900

    Was at a marsh in West Central Ia. today for a walkabout and saw a pair of Sandhill Cranes. Don’t remember seeing any round here
    before.

    AvatarDr Ruff
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    great news, theres a pair near palo that looks to be claiming a territory. very nice to see these ancient birds making a comeback in the midwest

    Avatarfarmer11
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    Post count: 79

    There are sandhill cranes at the Chichaqua Bottoms Greenbelt park north of Bondurant.

    Avatarlive4fall
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    Post count: 261

    There are several pairs in the Bellevue area and a group of about 12 in the Green Island WMA.

    A vote is like a rifle, its usefulness depends upon the character of the user- Teddy Roosevelt

    Avatarstevenoak
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    Post count: 1172

    Few come thru pool 16 every year, hang around and feed a few days. MMMMMM. “Rib-eye in the sky” possibly the best eating critter I ever hunted.

    Avatarspeng5
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    Post count: 2928

    These are real sucky cell phone pics taken out of a car, but I saw these last year. Apparently they are making a comeback in some areas nearby but I had never seen them for myself, very cool birds.

    Very wary too, they started getting real uneasy when I stopped for pics even though I was pretty far away.

    3.5 tens3.5 tens
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    Post count: 434

    Seen them in the Tripoli area a few years ago, now seeing them south of Rockwell in areas from sheet water to Iowa river bottoms by Clarion
    Great even if only passing through

    "I have always had a soft spot in my heart for marshes. They challenge me to come and look. Their capacity for mothering wild life is far greater than the drier uplands, no matter how beautiful they may be. It seems to me that no man is closer to the beginning of things and the eternal motherhood of the outdoors than when he is familiar with a marsh."

    Avatarorngruffee
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    Been on bus trips out to Nebraska a couple of times to see them. When you hear their calls you will never forget them. Saw a Whooping crane with a big bunch of them one year. They roost on the sand bars and shallow waters of the Platte river to keep safe from predators.
    The low flows over the years has caused the sandbars to be covered with brush and trees. They had places where they were trying to restore the sand bars by mowing and bulldozing.

    Avatarstevenoak
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    Post count: 1172

    Quote by: speng5

    These are real sucky cell phone pics taken out of a car, but I saw these last year. Apparently they are making a comeback in some areas nearby but I had never seen them for myself, very cool birds.

    Very wary too, they started getting real uneasy when I stopped for pics even though I was pretty far away.

    There is a huge migration from Texas to Canada, thru the Dakotas. People travel miles to watch it in the rain water basin of Nebraska. Sandhills have a season on them in Texas and North Dakota. Seems the last few years they widen their path. There are very common on the lower Wisconsin River as well. They are Leary of vehicles due to drive bys .

    Avatarnorthwoodsbucks
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    Last spring and much of the early part of the summer I saw them daily near my house about 40 min north of the Minneapolis area. As many as about 12 together although more commonly in groups of 2-4. The spend a lot of times in fields that are near the lake.

    I dont recall seeing them at all 10 years ago in the same areas, it is great to see them around. I have not seen them yet this spring but it seems just a little on the early side yet, am expecting them within the next week or two.

    WhipWhip
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    Post count: 2363

    Started seeing them here where I live in Wyoming about 20 years ago. Now we have many that summer here and a limited season in the fall. Drawing for 50 tags. They are considered prime rib of the sky. I’ve not eaten one myself yet but let a young guy shoot one on my farm last fall. He brought it by the house and they are big. Huge beak like a dagger not dog friendly. I decided to put in for a tag this year.

    Whip

    Avatarspeng5
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    Post count: 2928

    Quote by: Whip

    Started seeing them here where I live in Wyoming about 20 years ago. Now we have many that summer here and a limited season in the fall. Drawing for 50 tags. They are considered prime rib of the sky. I’ve not eaten one myself yet but let a young guy shoot one on my farm last fall. He brought it by the house and they are big. Huge beak like a dagger not dog friendly. I decided to put in for a tag this year.

    I am guessing mostly people pass shoot along known routes? Or do people decoy them?

    WhipWhip
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    Post count: 2363

    Of the couple I know about they either pass shoot leaving a field or like the young man at my place snuck down a. Irrigation ditch and jump shot it. The first two times he tried pass shooting he was in the wrong spot. Finally the birds were in the right spot and his third time was a charm.

    Whip

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