Home Forums Hunting Predator/Varmint Hunting Cause of death opinion

Viewing 10 posts - 16 through 25 (of 25 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • Avatarsparkie
    Participant
    Post count: 163

    Quote by: whiterook

    Who knows how the calf died. However, no scavenger bird I know of. Can pull a fresh cow hide off of the carcass.

    Another good point! Can’t see the carcass through spotting scope this morning. I’ll see if I can find any tracks in the area tonight.

    Avatarwhiterook
    Participant
    Post count: 5576

    Quote by: sparkie

    Quote by: whiterook

    Who knows how the calf died. However, no scavenger bird I know of. Can pull a fresh cow hide off of the carcass.

    Another good point! Can’t see the carcass through spotting scope this morning. I’ll see if I can find any tracks in the area tonight.

    If it were my calf & I couldn’t tell from outwards appearances. Then I would skin that calf & look for trauma to the neck/throat area.

    Further viewing your pics. I see a right rear leg fracture. It would take a boatload of pressure to snap a calf’s legs.

    Avatarphonzie
    Participant
    Post count: 81

    I will be the first to admit, making assumptions off of a couple of pictures is tough. I think it probably died from some unknown reason and something ate it after that. Looks like the belly is awfully full unless it was laying there for a few days before you took the pictures ? It could have been coyotes eating on it. As far as the legs being tore up, I think that was done by whatever was eating it. In my opinion, this time of year the male coyotes would be out looking for food alone and would find it tough to drag much of a calf back to the den. But may feed on it a little itself and then look for something easier to take back to the den. And that maybe why it is not picked cleaner. However, if this was early fall, I would suspect a lot more coyotes feeding on it at once and taking little time to clean it up. Again, just my opinion, but I suspect it was not killed by a predator. Lightning maybe, but usually they bloat almost instantly and look smell as if they have been burnt. Then again maybe that is why the belly looks so full and I see some old, rotting looking flesh on the rib cage area? Keep us posted

    Avatarkenhump
    Participant
    Post count: 12769

    Quote by: phonzie

    I will be the first to admit, making assumptions off of a couple of pictures is tough. I think it probably died from some unknown reason and something ate it after that. Looks like the belly is awfully full unless it was laying there for a few days before you took the pictures ? It could have been coyotes eating on it. As far as the legs being tore up, I think that was done by whatever was eating it. In my opinion, this time of year the male coyotes would be out looking for food alone and would find it tough to drag much of a calf back to the den. But may feed on it a little itself and then look for something easier to take back to the den. And that maybe why it is not picked cleaner. However, if this was early fall, I would suspect a lot more coyotes feeding on it at once and taking little time to clean it up. Again, just my opinion, but I suspect it was not killed by a predator. Lightning maybe, but usually they bloat almost instantly and look smell as if they have been burnt. Then again maybe that is why the belly looks so full and I see some old, rotting looking flesh on the rib cage area? Keep us posted

    He knows it happened within hours of picture. Here is a picture of a cow hit by lightening. I think the calf was well grounded in wet ground when the lightening hit it and preceeded thru the body.
    https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&rct=j&q=cow+lightning+strike&source=images&cd=&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0CAcQjRw&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.dailymail.co.uk%2Fnews%2Farticle-1136542%2FPictured-The-cow-zapped-lightning–survived.html&ei=VXhbVcrVEsuisAW2rYHABQ&bvm=bv.93564037,d.b2w&psig=AFQjCNGQ6s7KycmsTGs2h8fSQhSf6wP4zw&ust=1432144300428115

    WhipWhip
    Participant
    Post count: 2363

    Its pretty hard to tell what happened after a few days went by. Sure too bad however with the price of calves currently every one is a big loss.

    Whiterook, a bear will take and peel the hide off of a critter before eating. I have actually seen where this has happened.

    Whip

    Avatarwhiterook
    Participant
    Post count: 5576

    Quote by: Whip

    Its pretty hard to tell what happened after a few days went by. Sure too bad however with the price of calves currently every one is a big loss.

    Whiterook, a bear will take and peel the hide off of a critter before eating. I have actually seen where this has happened.

    Last coyote I killed the bullet exited its abdomen area. Massive exit hole. So she stayed where she fell. As she was near cut in 1/2. Snow melted & I went back the next wk. Their she laid maybe 20′ from where she fell. Something, had de-gloved her then fed upon her. Pulling her hide from stern to bow. As if she was on a skinning pole. I couldn’t detect any legible tracks around the carcass.

    Avatarphonzie
    Participant
    Post count: 81

    Quote by: kenhump

    Quote by: phonzie

    I will be the first to admit, making assumptions off of a couple of pictures is tough. I think it probably died from some unknown reason and something ate it after that. Looks like the belly is awfully full unless it was laying there for a few days before you took the pictures ? It could have been coyotes eating on it. As far as the legs being tore up, I think that was done by whatever was eating it. In my opinion, this time of year the male coyotes would be out looking for food alone and would find it tough to drag much of a calf back to the den. But may feed on it a little itself and then look for something easier to take back to the den. And that maybe why it is not picked cleaner. However, if this was early fall, I would suspect a lot more coyotes feeding on it at once and taking little time to clean it up. Again, just my opinion, but I suspect it was not killed by a predator. Lightning maybe, but usually they bloat almost instantly and look smell as if they have been burnt. Then again maybe that is why the belly looks so full and I see some old, rotting looking flesh on the rib cage area? Keep us posted

    He knows it happened within hours of picture. Here is a picture of a cow hit by lightening. I think the calf was well grounded in wet ground when the lightening hit it and preceeded thru the body.
    https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&rct=j&q=cow+lightning+strike&source=images&cd=&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0CAcQjRw&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.dailymail.co.uk%2Fnews%2Farticle-1136542%2FPictured-The-cow-zapped-lightning–survived.html&ei=VXhbVcrVEsuisAW2rYHABQ&bvm=bv.93564037,d.b2w&psig=AFQjCNGQ6s7KycmsTGs2h8fSQhSf6wP4zw&ust=1432144300428115

    That makes sense to me Ken. I don’t have much experience with cattle, but we pasture farrow hogs and I have seen a few sows struck by lightning. Usually the tell tale sign is the instant bloating.

    Avatarsparkie
    Participant
    Post count: 163

    Nothing new to report, only turkey vulchers feeding on the carcass. Have seen a few coyotes checking it out, but nothing to put a new spin on the story. I guess the true cause of death of calf #73 will remain a mystery & a story.

    TheDuckMasterTheDuckMaster
    Participant
    Post count: 1594

    Quote by: sparkie

    Nothing new to report, only turkey vulchers feeding on the carcass. Have seen a few coyotes checking it out, but nothing to put a new spin on the story. I guess the true cause of death of calf #73 will remain a mystery & a story.

    I just don’t understand why Iowa coyotes wont touch a calf or cow. They will eat hogs and cleanings in the spring. Plumbgranny had a neighbor a few years back that lost a dairy cow. If I remember correctly coyote tracks went around the carcass but the carcass it stood in tact for weeks. I bet it floated away in the spring floods.

    Go out west and a 1100 pound cow will last a week to 10 days and 600 pound calves are gone in 4-5 days due to coyotes.

    Like I have always said about calling yotes in Iowa use coyote vocalizations to main consistent as Iowa coyotes just aren’t that hungry!

    Larry

    AvatarBushFamilyNine
    Participant
    Post count: 354

    Perhaps it is a learned taste? The cattle land is a little smaller in size here and the cows closer. Maybe we do such a good job keeping them away that the coyotes learn to enjoy rabbit, pheasant, cat and chicken?

Viewing 10 posts - 16 through 25 (of 25 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.