Home Forums Fishing Fly Fishing Best Pan Fish Flies in Central Iowa

Viewing 19 posts - 1 through 19 (of 19 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • Avatarcys_av8r
    Participant
    Post count: 179
    Up
    0
    Down

    Newbie fly fisherman here. Just started tying as well. Learning the basics via YouTube.

    I plan to do some trout fishing in NE Iowa, but living in Central Iowa and near some great farm ponds, my most frequent fishing will be for Bluegills, Crappie.

    So my question is……What are the best flies for pan fish around here?

    On.IowaOn.Iowa
    Participant
    Post count: 224
    Up
    0
    Down

    I’m not a fly fisherman, but I’ve caught hundreds of panfish per day using a simple black and on a spinning reel. I use 4lb mono with a bobber (for casting weight, mostly) about 4′ up the line and just slay them.

    AvatarTeamAsgrow
    Participant
    Post count: 9152
    Up
    0
    Down

    Wooly buggers are good Iowa Flys.

    I tie marabou jigs too that would work on a fly set up 1/80 and 1/64th jigs would then give you a little sink. I would use black or darker colors for gills but catch plenty of crappies on them too and trout.

    Avatarcys_av8r
    Participant
    Post count: 179
    Up
    0
    Down

    Quote by: TeamAsgrow

    Wooly buggers are good Iowa Flys.

    I tie marabou jigs too that would work on a fly set up 1/80 and 1/64th jigs would then give you a little sink. I would use black or darker colors for gills but catch plenty of crappies on them too and trout.

    Good stuff…..that just happens to be one of the flies I have tied to this point.

    My first one wasn’t great, but I have tied 2 more pretty decent ones.

    I have read that catching bluegills and crappies on a fly rod is a blast, have to think it is!

    AvatarTeamAsgrow
    Participant
    Post count: 9152
    Up
    0
    Down

    I would look into scud patterns too, those look like they arent too tough to tie and would work real well for gills

    AvatarRGR175
    Participant
    Post count: 161
    Up
    0
    Down

    Great info. I’m in the same boat as OP. Just learning to tie flies and these replies are very helpful.

    Anything different for ice flies?

    Avatardixson42002
    Participant
    Post count: 91
    Up
    0
    Down

    You can also be really successful with small poppers on top when they’re in the right mood. This would probably be the most fun and biggest advantage with using your fly rod. Otherwise, you can definitely catch them with nymphs under a float. Casting is a little more difficult when you have the added weight of the float, but it’s real similar to fishing a worm under a bobber. Just give it a few twitches. Prince nymphs are tough to beat in my opinion. Good luck!

    AvatarCJ
    Participant
    Post count: 14
    Up
    0
    Down

    I’ve found small poppers work through mid-July and then resort to those previously mentioned but would add an ant to that as well. I’m also fishing from a boat and always surprised at how close to the shoreline gills can be. If a cast goes astray (and I always blame it on the wind) and it hits brush or tree, etc. then falls/drops into the water it’s really a natural presentation. Just work your fly from there and then cast again. Too much splattering on the surface spooks the gills.

    Before you spend a lot on poppers or buying popper heads for blue gills if you’re tying, find some old flip-flops or go to $ General and buy a pair. Cut your popper heads out of the flip-flops using a razor blade or utility knife and work a needle through the head to slide your hook through. If you have any empty shell casings or go to a hardware store and get a piece of metal tubing and you’ve got the same thing, you can heat it up and then punch your heads out of the flip-flop. I use a .223 casing, cut it about a 1/4″ to 3/8″, a 12 – 14 dry fly hook along with deer belly hair and a little tinsel. You’ll be surprised.

    Avatardjo
    Participant
    Post count: 356
    Up
    0
    Down

    I do 90% of my bluegill fishing with poppers. They are so much more fun than any subsurface fly and work nearly as well. Here is a real simple tie that is nearly bullet proof and works very well. I like it best in yellow (http://www.flyanglersonline.com).

    David

    Avatarturkeyguy55
    Participant
    Post count: 207
    Up
    0
    Down

    I have been tying beatles from foam that you get from wal mart in the craft section. Starting in June untill late fall. You tube is your friend to learn how to tie all kinds of patterns. It might look tough at first but my 11 year old grandson loves to tie them and no matter how unique he makes them they seem to catch all kinds of fish. He watched a video on how to tie a Japenese beetle and it was the best fly for the season. Just remember no fly is exactly the same in nature. Sometimes the guy who tie’s them worries too much about the fly being perfect 😀 It’s a great hobby during the winter time.

    Avatar56bert
    Participant
    Post count: 8
    Up
    0
    Down

    I ‘ve been fly fishing in n/west Ia. for at least 15 years, got my nephew into it 10 years ago. We just love it. I tie a yellow gurgle pop with wh/blk barred legs on a no. 10 or 12 dry fly hook. Sometimes the same thing in black. These work extremely well on the surface. For sub-surface fishing with an indicator we use no10 or 12 wooly buggers in black or chartruse beaded or not. Other flies we use are damsel nymph , zud bug , pregnant shrimp , prince nymph or gold ribbed hares ear. I,m a been a auto mechanic for 40+years.& these beat up hands & fingers can still manage to tie flies. It seems when I start on a fly pattern, the first several don’t look quite right. That doesn’t mean they can’t work. Sometimes it seems our best flies are the ones that have caught many fish and are shredded up. Have fun fly fishin , Bert

    AvatarHideHunter
    Participant
    Post count: 763
    Up
    0
    Down

    Easily 90% of my warm weather fly fishing is with the fly rod. I “roll my own” – and many are “my variation of”. 😉 All my panfish flies must have three properties: 1.) They must catch fish.. 2.) They “should” be relatively easy to tie (sometimes I stray here 😉 ) and 3.) they must be relatively indestructible. Panfish (especially those hard-mouthed bluegills) are hard on flies (especially if you catch 50 in an afternoon) 😉 .

    I use a lot of Boa yarn (google boa leech). You can get as simple or creative as you wish and you will catch fish.

    I use a lot of bead chain eyes. Rubber legs.. Tear apart one bungie cord and you will find a huge supply. Marabou “boa” can often be bought at the Dollar Store for almost nothing. The sheets of foam you buy at Hobby Lobby, or the like, have many uses. I used to tie deer hair – then I discovered foam. 😉 I like “chuggers” and Stealth Bombers in all sizes from #12 to 1/0.

    Hope you needed another bad habit.. It is addictive.;)

    cys – sent you an email..

    OldbearOldbear
    Participant
    Post count: 2840
    Up
    0
    Down

    My favorite is a San Juan worm fly. Put it about 2′ below a dinky bobber.

    Mayor of Hickory Grove

    Avatarcys_av8r
    Participant
    Post count: 179
    Up
    0
    Down

    Haven’t been able to get back to the forum. Thanks for all of the great info.

    A couple of days ago I went to Michael’s (a art/craft shop) and bought a couple of sheets of 8 and 1/2 by 11 inch foam that people use for art projects.

    I got some spray glue and glued two sheets together. Then took a hollow punch and starting punching out 3/16in popper heads. Works great and was cheap. The foam sheets were less than a buck a piece. Haven’t had time to tie lately, but when I get a “presentable” popper I will post a pic.

    Avatarmunchy71
    Participant
    Post count: 1111
    Up
    0
    Down

    Quote by: dixson42002

    … Otherwise, you can definitely catch them with nymphs under a float.

    THIS!

    Or you can substitute a foam hopper for the float and have chance at catching them top-water and sub-surface. I use this same exact setup for NE Iowa trout. Prince, Hare’s Ear, Copper John and Pheasant Tail are all good nymph patterns that will catch trout AND panfish. 😉

    -Munchy

    AvatarJT21
    Participant
    Post count: 6
    Up
    0
    Down

    One of my favorite panfish flies is the “Goddard Caddis” trout fly in a size #10. It should be fished on the surface especially towards evening. Keep it dry with false casting and use a silicon paste. I use a #3 or #4 weight fly rod 8 -9′ in length.

    Avatargone bassin
    Participant
    Post count: 371
    Up
    0
    Down

    My favorite bluegill fly is an ant pattern, of sorts, with wooly bugger hackle wrapped between two 3mm tungsten beads on a #12 hook. I finish with some blood quills sticking out of the front of the fly, pointing forward instead of backward. All black seems to catch the most fish.

    Avatarcys_av8r
    Participant
    Post count: 179
    Up
    0
    Down

    Don’t get back to the forums enough!

    I have been killing gills and bass all spring and summer long with the fly rod.

    In the spring I was using mostly streamers like buggers and small clouser minnows.

    Then it was to foam poppers. Then double barrel popper for big bass.

    Lately it has been grasshoppers, ants, and beetles all made out of craft foam from Michael’s Art store and some deer hair of course.

    Nothing in my opinion is more fun that catching big gills on a 3wt swinging a beetle or a hopper.

    AvatarBrad Phillips
    Participant
    Post count: 3187
    Up
    0
    Down

    Bimbo Skunk: fly, jig or ice 😀 😀

Viewing 19 posts - 1 through 19 (of 19 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.