Home Forums Hunting Deer Hunting Best 3 point tiller

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  • AvatarCRIA1576
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    Post count: 574

    Hey guys,

    I am going to buy a 48″ 3-point tiller for my 25hp Kubota this spring. I will be using it to work our home garden as well as prepare food plots for deer season. King Kutter seems to be the most available/popular brand, but are there better options out there that you guys have experience using? I am looking to buy next month, and appreciate any ideas.

    Thank you!

    Joel

    AvatarDGorman
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    Post count: 1851

    We bought the 48″ king kutter a couple years ago and have been very happy with it. I haven’t had any problems and I’ve tilled plenty of gardens and several acres of food plot each year. I have a 2305 John Deere which should be similar to your Kubota and it handles it well. I had to use a quick connect as my tractor has short 3 pt arms so the pto shaft was too long without it but that wasn’t a big deal. It doesn’t cut very deep on a first pass of untilled ground but I’m not sure any of them do. We bought ours at Blain’s in Dubuque. My wife even haggled a bit and got them to take an extra hundred dollars off their sale price.

    AvatarCRIA1576
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    Post count: 574

    Thank you for the feedback. Yes, my Kubota is a B2410, so very similar to your JD. Good call on the quick connect too. I borrowed a buddies 60″ KK last year and the PTO shaft was on a bind with it lifted all the way up. I was able to use the larger tiller for a sweet corn patch and our garden, but my tractor was maxed out. I should be able to get more RPMs without bringing my tractor to its knees with the 48″.

    I have a spring tooth cultivator that I am going to use to make a first pass and rip the food plots I will be planting this spring. I will make a second and possibly third pass with the tiller. Next I plan to let the weeds come up a few inches, burn them down with round up and then culti-pack and plant.

    Avatariaredneck72
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    Post count: 270

    For the money, I think KK is a great choice. Common, widely available parts, affordable. I have a 60″ on my B7800 Kubota, 30hp. I did learn quickly that breaking new ground takes about 5 passes. I strongly recommend plowing, ripping or disking prior to tilling. Tiller will then do much better with less passes, saving time and fuel.

    If I had lots of extra money I would have spent it on a Land Pride reverse tine model.

    I bought a 1 bottom moldboard plow for $90. A pass with the plow and 1 pass with the tilled and all is good. I recently bought a springtooth for $20 so will add that to the tillage routine. I suggest plowing in fall, springtooth in spring fhen till, you will have a nice seed bed.

    AvatarCRIA1576
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    Post count: 574

    Roger that bud, and i’ve seen the reverse tine models out there as well. What is the benefit of this vs. standard?

    AvatarLarry Richard
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    Post count: 451

    My John Deere 2720 has pulled a 60 in tiller of the same brand for several years now. I can create a sod to seed bed in just a couple of passes. It’s green so some extra costs I suppose, but my JD dealer is within sight so I know where to take it if it broke. The quick tatch or i max as JD calls it is worth every penny asyou add other toys to your tractor.

    AvatarBullBlueGill
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    Post count: 156

    I bought a woods tc 74 last spring. It does an amazing job. The reverse tiller was 350 more i think, I didn’t go with that option. I’m glad I didn’t, the forward does a super job. I till about 5 acres of food plots with it.

    One little weld popped on the gate, Woods replaced it. Nice thing is they are out of Ill and WI, so some what local. I think i paid $1800 for it not setup. the setup is simple. I had it sent to the farm, set up took about an hour. Getting it out of the crate was the hardest part.

    Only problem with KK is availability of parts quickly and someone to fix if you don’t want to do it yourself. If you are willing to fix stuff or someone else that will do it, then KK is a good option for you.

    one of the reasons I went with Woods is it’s a “supposed” better name brand and the difference in price for the 6 ft vs KK was no different. No one at Fleet Farm knew anything about them, they said you have to call KK for parts or service…I felt like if I bought it and walked out of the door i walked into this black hole.

    AvatarBrownItsDown
    Participant
    Post count: 1066

    When I had my tractor, I bought one of those Best Products tillers from ebay. Great tiller. Gear driven in an oil bath. Only issue I had was breaking tines occasionally, so I bought extras and replaced them when I did. I’ve since sold all of my tractor stuff and upgraded to a track-steer that built a tandem disc mounted on a quick attach plate for. It doesn’t whip up the dirt as thoroughly as the tiller did, but it gets the job done.

    AvatarTeamAsgrow
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    Post count: 9152

    Do you have a pic of your disc that you built? That sounds like something I would be interested in seeing!

    drifty4drifty4
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    Post count: 770

    As long as your tractor is heavy enough so it will not get pushed ahead of the tiller, the reverse is probably not needed. The reverse tine option doesn’t lay the soil as nice behind the tiller either when running in reverse. I have a walk behind tiller that has the reverse on it and it comes in handy there.

    I had an old John Deere garden tractor that the tiller would push the tractor ahead when the dirt was hard, that was a pain. I guess I would talk to the dealer and find out if the tractor will hold the ground or not. If not the the reverse might be needed.

    Maybe they can give you a name of a customer that you can talk to about their experiences.

    Genesis 27:3
    Now therefore take, I pray thee, thy weapons, thy quiver and thy bow, and go out to the field, and take me some venison;

    AvatarBrownItsDown
    Participant
    Post count: 1066

    Quote by: TeamAsgrow

    Do you have a pic of your disc that you built? That sounds like something I would be interested in seeing!

    I just checked my computer for an original pic that I took of it, and can’t find it. Next time I’m out by it, I’ll take a pic and post it here for you TeamAsgrow. I found and bought a sturdy dual / tandem disk that was 6ish feet wide. Then I flipped the disk direction so that it could be pushed instead of pulled. Then I cut and welded what used to be the front 3pt hitch section to a quick attach plate. My machine is like 5 tons or better, so I can really put some pressure on the disk if I throttle down the loader arms. I’m always running into stuff when I drive in reverse, so I push it a lot more than I pull it in reverse. It does kick up dust right in front of me while I’m driving, and it makes me drive directly over top of the freshly churned soil, but the tracks only make like 8-lb per square inch for a footprint, so it doesn’t compact the soil much. It works well for what I use it for.

    AvatarBullBlueGill
    Participant
    Post count: 156

    Quote by: drifty4

    As long as your tractor is heavy enough so it will not get pushed ahead of the tiller, the reverse is probably not needed. The reverse tine option doesn’t lay the soil as nice behind the tiller either when running in reverse. I have a walk behind tiller that has the reverse on it and it comes in handy there.

    I had an old John Deere tractor that the tiller would push the tractor ahead when the dirt was hard, that was a pain. I guess I would talk to the dealer and find out if the tractor will hold the ground or not. If not the the reverse might be needed.

    Maybe they can give you a name of a customer that you can talk to about their experiences.

    wow, never heard of a tiller pushing a tractor.

    By the way, reverse tine vs standard I see was asked about. Reverse tine churnes the dirt up better, more mixing basically. Con’s of a Reverse is the debris gets stuck more easily and you’ll break tines, jam it up. IF you have rocks, logs, lot’s of junk, don’t get reverse. I got the standard forward. it’s does more than ample job. It was better than what I expected. Many companies will show you pics of what Reverse and standard will do. Those pics are deceiving. Forward is PLENTY good for gardens and food plots, we are not planting golf course putting greens.

    AvatarTeamAsgrow
    Participant
    Post count: 9152

    Quote by: BrownItsDown

    Quote by: TeamAsgrow

    Do you have a pic of your disc that you built? That sounds like something I would be interested in seeing!

    I just checked my computer for an original pic that I took of it, and can’t find it. Next time I’m out by it, I’ll take a pic and post it here for you TeamAsgrow. I found and bought a sturdy dual / tandem disk that was 6ish feet wide. Then I flipped the disk direction so that it could be pushed instead of pulled. Then I cut and welded what used to be the front 3pt hitch section to a quick attach plate. My machine is like 5 tons or better, so I can really put some pressure on the disk if I throttle down the loader arms. I’m always running into stuff when I drive in reverse, so I push it a lot more than I pull it in reverse. It does kick up dust right in front of me while I’m driving, and it makes me drive directly over top of the freshly churned soil, but the tracks only make like 8-lb per square inch for a footprint, so it doesn’t compact the soil much. It works well for what I use it for.

    What is kind of skid steer do you have?

    AvatarBrownItsDown
    Participant
    Post count: 1066

    Quote by: TeamAsgrow

    Quote by: BrownItsDown

    Quote by: TeamAsgrow

    Do you have a pic of your disc that you built? That sounds like something I would be interested in seeing!

    I just checked my computer for an original pic that I took of it, and can’t find it. Next time I’m out by it, I’ll take a pic and post it here for you TeamAsgrow. I found and bought a sturdy dual / tandem disk that was 6ish feet wide. Then I flipped the disk direction so that it could be pushed instead of pulled. Then I cut and welded what used to be the front 3pt hitch section to a quick attach plate. My machine is like 5 tons or better, so I can really put some pressure on the disk if I throttle down the loader arms. I’m always running into stuff when I drive in reverse, so I push it a lot more than I pull it in reverse. It does kick up dust right in front of me while I’m driving, and it makes me drive directly over top of the freshly churned soil, but the tracks only make like 8-lb per square inch for a footprint, so it doesn’t compact the soil much. It works well for what I use it for.

    What is kind of skid steer do you have?

    CASE 440CT

    drifty4drifty4
    Participant
    Post count: 770

    bullbluegill,

    I should have made that clear, it was a John Deere garden tractor, not a full sized one, and I have edited that statement.

    Genesis 27:3
    Now therefore take, I pray thee, thy weapons, thy quiver and thy bow, and go out to the field, and take me some venison;

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