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  • AvatarCRIA1576
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    Is it too late to plant Appin turnips for a fall food plot?

    ihuntducksalot72ihuntducksalot72
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    We usually planted purple tops around August 1st, but planted them
    As late as the 20th one year. I’d say you are a little late to develop much for bulb size. If I was going to plant anything now it would be rye, oats, crimson clover. Actually might even wait a week for that We had awesome luck with that!

    AvatarCRIA1576
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    Thank you for the feedback. I have a small bag of Appin’s and a big bag of Big Buck Annual fall mix. I may save the Appin’s for next year and stretch the fall mix over the two plots if it is now too late. 😡

    AvatarDaver
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    It is too late to plant turnips and get good sized bulbs, BUT…if you got them in right away AND got some rain on them to germinate them…you could still get some leafy plants(tops) and some small bulbs. I have planted them at this time of the year and under good conditions had them produce bulbs that were roughly the size of golf balls. To get the baseball and softball sized turnips though, they really needed to be in a month or so ago.

    FWIW, radishes planted now have a little better chance of developing good sized, not maximum, bulbs AND IMO deer prefer their tops better than turnips anyway. So you could heavy, or all, on radishes right now.

    AvatarCRIA1576
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    Thank you Daver. The big buck annual mix I have is a 76/24 variety of winter peas and kale to 4 different varieties of brassicas. I mowed the plots last Wednesday and a buddy disked the crap out of them the same day. The ground is super loose right now and I am in the process of cultipacking it. Afterwards I will be broadcasting the seed with a hand seeder and then packing again.

    Now all we need is some stinking rain in W Central Iowa!

    AvatarDaver
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    Peas can/should be planted now through say the 20th of September. IMHO the big buck annual mix that you have is not a good blend…since the brassicas should have ideally been planted a month ago and the peas should be planted now through roughly the 20th. So those things should not be mixed IMO…but you will find that in store bought mixes. At any rate, I would plant it now and hope for some rain. Remember to fertilize per the recommendations, particularly with Nitrogen.

    AvatarCRIA1576
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    Thank you Daver, and what you’re saying makes sense. However, it could be that the specific planting seasons for different varieties of turnips can change based on region. Cool season vs. warm, northern vs. southern, etc…

    Another member on the site donated this seed as his food plot plans fell through this year. He purchased the seed from Welter Seed and Honey, a full service feed/seed company (http://www.welterseed.com). This wasn’t bought at Scheels, Cabelas, Bass Pro, etc… Also, because the peas are a nitrogen fixer and make up 70% of the mix, i do not intend to add any nitrogen for this planting.

    At the end of the day, this is the seed I have available, and I don’t have a lot of $$$ to buy a bunch of new. This seems to be a solid fall mix based on what I’ve read, and the one thing I may do is add a little annual fall rye. That being said, I respect your experience and opinion, and will come back to this thread with an update on how it turns out.

    Thanks again!

    AvatarDaver
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    Gotcha. FWIW, I am very familiar with Welter Seed, having bought plenty from them in the past. They are a high quality, good value source. I would use them more if they weren’t the opposite direction from my farm…good company. That being said, I am a little surprised by this mix.

    If you have the seed…what the heck…plant away I say. 🙂 Peas are a N fixer…but I am truly not sure how that works biologically if you will get enough N in time from the peas to help the brassicas. (Is there an agronomist in this house? :))

    AvatarCRIA1576
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    The good news is that the ground these are being planted in hasn’t been farmed in more than 10 years, so I would think there would be some nitrogen banked in it from the passing seasons. However, can a I guy get ammonium nitrate/Urea from Bomgaars or is the local coop the best answer in your experience?

    ***EDIT***
    All- I just checked with the coop in town, and they only charge $.15/pound for Urea. For the turnips I’ve seen recommendations of 50-70# per acre, and at 46% strength, at 50# per acre I’m looking at 100# or $15 for the fertilizer. I thought this was very reasonable and all I need are a few 5 gallon buckets to load up. 😀

    AvatarDaver
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    That price for urea does seem very good…one key thing to bear in mind though regarding urea is that it will evaporate to some extent, perhaps significantly, if it is just placed on the soil surface. I linked an article below that explains this very well I think. When I apply urea I will either spread it and then till it in OR apply it just in front of a rain. Normally, I am tilling it in.

    There isn’t any rain showing in the 10 day forecast right now…so you may want to think about tilling it in.

    https://www.noble.org/news/publications/ag-news-and-views/2009/may/nitrogen-losses-from-urea/

    AvatarCRIA1576
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    That’s a great call out and thank you for the article. I will likely broadcast the seed, broadcast the fertilizer and then cultipack it all one more time. It won’t bury all of the urea, but it is better than just leaving on top like you said.

    My buddy has a big water tank that he used for watering trees. I may see if I can rig up a hose to water the food plots to get them going.

    AvatarCRIA1576
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    Plots are mowed, disked, packed, planted, fertilized, packed, and ready for rain. If ya’ll can do your best rain dance the next few days I would appreciate it! 😀

    AvatarCRIA1576
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    Made it out to the farm yesterday to check on plots and pull camera SD cards. The larger plot in the bottom with the fall mix is coming along nicely thanks to the timely rains the last few weeks. I have seedlings from 1-3″ tall and very good distribution and coverage across the plot. The camera just off the edge of this plot had decent traffic with a few nice bucks and tons of does/fawns.

    The appin turnips in the smaller plot on top of the hill are a little further behind, with most plants around 1-2″ and just getting started. This spot gets full sun and wind, and the distribution and coverage doesn’t appear to be as good, but we’ll see what they look like in a couple weeks. The interesting thing is that my camera on the edge of this plot captured a lot of deer grazing the tops off the baby turnips and other plants that are coming up. So, even if they don’t reach maturity, they are already having an impact and drawing a crowd.

    UNEXPECTED OBSERVATION- I totally missed the fact that my camera overlooking the appin plot is mounted to the trunk of a mature white oak tree. This is an older Bushnell no-flash camera, and I only run 2G cards in it. In 9 days the card was filled with over 3,000 pictures. There were deer in the food plot consistently, however, the vast majority of the traffic was 5-10 yards in front of my camera in the grass on the field edge where the does/fawns were grazing and digging for acorns. If your farm has white oaks bearing good mast, I highly recommend you put an early season set nearby. I had good daytime and evening activity with mature bucks and countless bald deer from 9/7-9/16.

    The most exciting thing I saw while pulling cards was a hood sized scrape in front of my appin plot camera under the low-hanging oak branches. Upon reviewing the pictures, I had 4 shooter bucks visit the scrape, and they all worked the scrape and reared up on their back legs to rake the branches with their horns. It was like they had all gone to the same scrape making class, because they all approached the scrape from the same direction and followed the same routine. If I scroll through the pictures, it is almost as good as video! VERY, VERY, COOL! 😀

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