Aged deer 2018-12-04T13:29:12+00:00

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  • fisher24
    Participant
    Post count: 44

    I don’t want to start a debate on whether aging a deer does anything but I do have a question about after you age the meat. The dry outer side of the meat. Are you supposed to trim that away? Or can it stay? I have been trimming it off and not losing much meat at all but I am curious what other people do.

    WhipWhip
    Participant
    Post count: 2300

    I always trim the rind off.

    Whip

    twdenney
    Participant
    Post count: 728

    I would also like to know what others do with dry outside of meat after aging?  Also what are you experiences aging deer…time, temps, cutting techniques, and recipes, etc.

    medicdanomedicdano
    Participant
    Post count: 4953

    If i dry age I leave the hide on until I butcher, usually 5-7 days. You will have less loss that way. I have also wet aged with similar results, usually if the weather wont allow to hang in the garage. Butcher, vacuum seal and leave in refrigerator for 5-7 days.

    WhipWhip
    Participant
    Post count: 2300

    I always skin and if the weather cooperates I let them hang for at least 5 days if I can. I Need to build a cooler to hang quarters in. I cut back straps into butterfly steaks and wrap with bacon then vacuum seal. I then cut up hind quarters and last front quarters.  Some steaks from hinds maybe a roast. Fronts I normally bone and cut for hamburger grind.

    Whip

    primitiveprimitive
    Participant
    Post count: 177

    After hunting, shooting, tracking, finding, gutting dragging, loading, hauling, and hanging, I made sure to skin and get the carcass cooling. Deer can’t cool with its coat on. Then drink a few brew skis.  Best meat anywhere if taken care of it properly.  I never aged any deer over a day or two. Helped a guy who aged his deer once, it stunk.

    primitive

    fisher24
    Participant
    Post count: 44

    This is my first time dry aging. I have always wet aged so I was curious in the flavor and texture differences. These are also my first non-iowa deer. I harvested two west river whitetail does from south dakota. So maybe they will taste a bit different since there are less crops to eat out there but we will find out. Neck roast #1 will be on the menu later this week.

    medicdanomedicdano
    Participant
    Post count: 4953

    This is my first time dry aging. I have always wet aged so I was curious in the flavor and texture differences. These are also my first non-iowa deer. I harvested two west river whitetail does from south dakota. So maybe they will taste a bit different since there are less crops to eat out there but we will find out. Neck roast #1 will be on the menu later this week.

    Ive never noticed any flavor differences but the meat will be noticeably more tender, especially your steaks.

    primitiveprimitive
    Participant
    Post count: 177

    fisher – There are so many choice roasts on a deer. Friend gave me a neck roast years before I started deer hunting and it was horrible.  Don’t let a neck roast discourage you from trying a choice rump or roast off hind quarter. If I’m wrong, enjoy your meal.

    primitive

    WhipWhip
    Participant
    Post count: 2300

    I have several friends who hang meat for up to ten days in a cooler before cutting it up.  We had a guy in town who ran a meat cutting business during hunting season only 25 years ago. He aged at least 10 days and it was excellent. I killed a huge mule deer that was at the height of rut. It smelled terrible the day I killed him. I took him that deer and he told me this deer will take a little longer. Not sure how long it aged but turned out to be very good.

    Whip

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