A few from yesterday2019-03-12T15:54:03-05:00

Home Forums Hunting Predator/Varmint Hunting A few from yesterday

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  • Avatarcoydog
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    Avatarcoydog
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    Avatarcoydog
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    Avatarcoydog
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    Avatarcoydog
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    Avatarcoydog
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    Top 3 ended up chasing a herd of deer. Thus they jumped the fence in hot pursuit. Bottom 2 pics are the same coyote. He was a biggun. They are lucky I was not after them. 🙂

    AvatarKeokukCounty
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    Wow, These pics are just insane. Im glad you have shared these and all your other pics with us throughout the years E.V. You have captured a lot of good ones and again thank you

    Avatarcoydog
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    Top 3 ended up chasing a herd of deer. Thus they jumped the fence in hot pursuit. Bottom 2 pics are the same coyote. He was a biggun. They are lucky I was not after them. 🙂

     

    I never learned much from a dead critter. Observe them while they are alive.

    AvatarTally Ho
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    Sweet!

    You are correct! A lot of guys kill them and have no clue about them. I haven’t carried a center rifle in a few years if I call them in shotgun range I learn a lot more.

    Avatarcoydog
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    Sweet! You are correct! A lot of guys kill them and have no clue about them. I haven’t carried a center rifle in a few years if I call them in shotgun range I learn a lot more.

     

    I’ve seen & learned plenty just observing. This Winter rounds off my 54 th year predator hunting. Great memories.

    All I want now is a lion, the frosting on the cake.

    AvatarKeokukCounty
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    Notice that pic where the three are in the cornfield, It seems the one watching the other two with its tail between its legs could be the odd man out in this situation. Or could it be a female offspring left over to help rear the next batch of pups? Any thoughts?

    AvatarTally Ho
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    “I’ve seen & learned plenty just observing. This Winter rounds off my 54 th year predator hunting. Great memories. All I want now is a lion, the frosting on the cake.”[/quote]

     

    I haven’t even been on this dirt 54 years! Like to hear the knowledge.

    • This reply was modified 2 months, 1 week ago by Avatar Tally Ho.
    Avatarcoydog
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    “I’ve seen & learned plenty just observing. This Winter rounds off my 54 th year predator hunting. Great memories. All I want now is a lion, the frosting on the cake.”

    I haven’t even been on this dirt 54 years! Like to hear the knowledge.[/quote]

     

    A few things; Red Fox do not have near the sharp eye sight as do the coyotes. They’ll also often dismiss ambient sounds around them. Such as a hunter getting near. Coyotes pay attention to ALL noises. So best to stealth in like a stalking cat. As for the Reds. High pitched noises peak their interest much more than deeper base tones. Higher the pitch sound. The more it will peak a Red’s interest.

    Coyotes; They miss very little. Specifically a local territorial older coyote. A pair of coyotes on the move. 99.9% of the time. The female sets the direction & the pace. Where she goes, he follows. She is also, (most often) the last of the two to lay her head down. She is the wariest of the two. When they bed down for the day. An old female is tops. If a hunter can fool her. That is something. When they dig a den or do a “clean-out” The male does the digging. If she doesn’t like his work. She may not accept that den hole & move on elsewhere.

    Coyotes routinely hug the inner 1/4 mile area of a 1 square mile area. Most all of the time. Both coyotes & the Red’s use the up-wind areas mainly as transition areas. To get from one down-wind area to the next.

    Most coyotes are bedded down for the day @ either pre-Sunrise up until 9-10am. Few stragglers on the move after 10am.

    Coyotes territories are roughly 5-7 square miles in total mass in my old hunt areas. Generally the territory is oblong & they often over lap a 1/4 mile or so. With the neighboring alpha pair. I call that over-lap area. The “buffer area” Because a certain degree of trespassing is tolerated by the local pair. When young coyote pups near Winter. They can often be found on the outer area’s of their parents territories.

    If you call in a pair or stalk a pair. Shoot the female 1st. Because often the male will linger some. Maybe offering a shot on him? Same goes for the Reds.

    • This reply was modified 2 months, 1 week ago by Avatar coydog.
    Avatarcoydog
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    Notice that pic where the three are in the cornfield, It seems the one watching the other two with its tail between its legs could be the odd man out in this situation. Or could it be a female offspring left over to help rear the next batch of pups? Any thoughts?

     

    The coyote trio, I believe is an alpha pr with a yearling female. Some experts claim on rare occasion. A yearling female is held back to raise next years litter. Other’s claim a female is held back. So the male can breed her & pass on his genes. I vote for the latter opinion. From the short time I observed the trio. Top left is the alpha male, top right is the alpha female. Bottom coyote is the yearling. The yearling acted subdued & looking for direction from the other two coyotes.  Welp, that’s my story & I’m sticking to it. haha

    AvatarKeokukCounty
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    The coyote trio, I believe is an alpha pr with a yearling female. Some experts claim on rare occasion. A yearling female is held back to raise next years litter. Other’s claim a female is held back. So the male can breed her & pass on his genes. I vote for the latter opinion. From the short time I observed the trio. Top left is the alpha male, top right is the alpha female. Bottom coyote is the yearling. The yearling acted subdued & looking for direction from the other two coyotes.  Welp, that’s my story & I’m sticking to it. haha

     

    Couple years ago I got to observe a trio from my sisters living room for a few hours that were across a highway laying down on the edge of a picked cornfield. Two were laying close together with the third one always laying by itself about fifty or so yards away. Always there was at least one with its head up while the other ones slept. Once in awhile they would get up to stretch , yawn, make a couple of circles and lay back down. The wind was always coming from their backside. I often wondered why a female would be selected to be held back to help raise her mothers next set of pups. If she was ready to breed I would think that she would be out looking for a date where another male would be picking her up to go to the prom. On the other side of my theory , I would think if she is held back for breeding purposes and if that’s the case, I would suspect that the male wouldn’t be her dad. I could possibly see this happening if something happened to her dad and her mom got a new male. Just my thoughts on this and I would like to here more on this subject. Thanks

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