Home Forums Hunting Reloading 45-70 deer load experience

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  • Avatar2-bucks
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    Post count: 40

    Any nice 45-70 loads for 250 or 300 grain bullets? I’m hoping to get a 250 yard load made up for a Marlin.

    AvatarTrapCyclone
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    Post count: 2552

    I started doing a bit of reloading for the 45-70 Govt. and have been a bit surprised by the results so far. The commercial ammo that I started with gives a pretty good thump and your shoulder really starts to get really sore after a couple shots. I started working up some reloads and figured the lowest starting powder would kick less than the commercial ammo, but I was surprised to find that even the lowest recommended powder load from the manual was kicking quite a bit harder than the commercial ammo I was using. At first I thought I must have loaded too much powder, but a check with the chronometer showed that the bullet velocity was roughly on par with the manual. It seems that because there are quite a few older rifles (i.e., trapdoor models) that shoot 45-70 Govt. which are not capable of handling the higher pressures of modern ammunition, many ammo manufacturers only put out loads that are considered safe for essentially all rifles in .45-70 Govt.

    So basically what I’m saying is that you will want to start using a good solid lead sled when doing load development for the 45-70 Govt. This thing kicks just as hard if not harder than a 3.5″ full turkey load!! 😯 😯

    Avatarmaxx
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    Post count: 2495

    Quote by: TrapCyclone

    I started doing a bit of reloading for the 45-70 Govt. and have been a bit surprised by the results so far. The commercial ammo that I started with gives a pretty good thump and your shoulder really starts to get really sore after a couple shots. I started working up some reloads and figured the lowest starting powder would kick less than the commercial ammo, but I was surprised to find that even the lowest recommended powder load from the manual was kicking quite a bit harder than the commercial ammo I was using. At first I thought I must have loaded too much powder, but a check with the chronometer showed that the bullet velocity was roughly on par with the manual. It seems that because there are quite a few older rifles (i.e., trapdoor models) that shoot 45-70 Govt. which are not capable of handling the higher pressures of modern ammunition, many ammo manufacturers only put out loads that are considered safe for essentially all rifles in .45-70 Govt.

    So basically what I’m saying is that you will want to start using a good solid lead sled when doing load development for the 45-70 Govt. This thing kicks just as hard if not harder than a 3.5″ full turkey load!! 😯 😯

    Have you tried lowering your bullet weight?

    To me sometimes it is just the gun itself. I had a really light weight turkey gun that was a 3″ gun and it was terrible. I have a Tikka T3 300 Win Mag that doesn’t bother me to shoot much.

    AvatarTrapCyclone
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    Post count: 2552

    Quote by: maxx

    Quote by: TrapCyclone

    I started doing a bit of reloading for the 45-70 Govt. and have been a bit surprised by the results so far. The commercial ammo that I started with gives a pretty good thump and your shoulder really starts to get really sore after a couple shots. I started working up some reloads and figured the lowest starting powder would kick less than the commercial ammo, but I was surprised to find that even the lowest recommended powder load from the manual was kicking quite a bit harder than the commercial ammo I was using. At first I thought I must have loaded too much powder, but a check with the chronometer showed that the bullet velocity was roughly on par with the manual. It seems that because there are quite a few older rifles (i.e., trapdoor models) that shoot 45-70 Govt. which are not capable of handling the higher pressures of modern ammunition, many ammo manufacturers only put out loads that are considered safe for essentially all rifles in .45-70 Govt.

    So basically what I’m saying is that you will want to start using a good solid lead sled when doing load development for the 45-70 Govt. This thing kicks just as hard if not harder than a 3.5″ full turkey load!! 😯 😯

    Have you tried lowering your bullet weight?

    To me sometimes it is just the gun itself. I had a really light weight turkey gun that was a 3″ gun and it was terrible. I have a Tikka T3 300 Win Mag that doesn’t bother me to shoot much.

    I started out using 300 gr Sierra bullets as these were suggested as being an ideal weight for deer hunting. It may also be the gun as it isn’t exactly all that heavy. I fully believe them when they say the .45-70 Govt. can take down any game animal on earth! That actually was one of the selling points for me as I thought it would be pretty cool to own something capable of taking down even a large cape buffalo with the right load.

    AvatarWallyman
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    Post count: 887

    Used my 45/70 this year in NE Iowa to help with the CWD in Allamakee county. I used the Winchester 300 grain Super X rounds. They don’t kick at all and roll deer like a dream.
    https://www.midwayusa.com/product/2900269092/winchester-super-x-ammunition-45-70-government-300-grain-jacketed-hollow-point-box-of-20

    Avatarmaxx
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    Post count: 2495

    300 grains of lead is a lot of lead to be pushing out of a gun, that is also a big chunk for a deer.

    If they make one that you can shoot lighter then I would give that a shot, it is going to make a fine bullet to kill a deer but it may be easier on your shoulder.

    Avatarlwh723
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    Post count: 755

    I’ve had a few guys use my 310APB in 45/70’s with good results. But definitely not for lever actions. 🙂 Shown next to 300 barnes original and 325 FTX. A good muzzle brake will help a lot with recoil or a Hybrid Suppressor with an Anchor brake.

    AvatarBrad Phillips
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    Post count: 3188

    Who would even imagine that a .45-70 levergun would have some thump on both ends????

    Load yourself up some .457125’s with a compressed load of black and see how that works for ya??? 500 grain boolit 😀

    I would just get a Gould HP mold and load some stuff up, OK recoil and plenty of knock down power. 330 grains of good old lead.

    AvatarBrad Phillips
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    Post count: 3188

    Just for an FYI, there are different pressure levels for trapdoors, leverguns, and Ruger #1’s

    AvatarDirt doc
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    Post count: 38

    Remington 300 grn JHP have proven to be very accurate bullets for me. I load them over IMR 3031 and get one hole groups out of my Guide guns at 100 yds. The load I use averages 1870 fps chronographed. Most loading manuals will give you starting loads and max for IMR 3031 in a 45-70. You can probably get greater muzzle velocity using IMR 4198 although I haven’t found a load as accurate as the one with IMR 3031. That increased velocity comes at a price though so I’ll be using the 3031 loads in December. My ballistics app tells me that the Remington 300 grain bullet with a muzzle velocity of 1870 and sighted at 100 yds. will be 12.8 inches low at 200 and 26.4 inches low at 250. I won’t be shooting at anything over 200 yds and hopefully I won’t have to shoot that far.

    AvatarWallyman
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    Post count: 887

    Quote by: maxx

    300 grains of lead is a lot of lead to be pushing out of a gun, that is also a big chunk for a deer.

    If they make one that you can shoot lighter then I would give that a shot, it is going to make a fine bullet to kill a deer but it may be easier on your shoulder.

    I disagree. 300 grains in a 45/70 is a light bullet. My 45acp handgun shoots 230 gr FMJs. The original bullet was 400 or 405 grains, for the 45/70. Also, my 12 gauge slug gun shot 1 ounce slugs, which are a lot more then 300 grains (1 oz=437.5 gr.) I am saving up brass now, but when I reload for my Guide Gun, I am sitting a 300 grain projectile on top of a stiff dose of 3031. My 2 cents. Probably heavier for elk and bear, liking the looks of the 350 grain Swift A Frames.

    Avatarmaxx
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    Post count: 2495

    Quote by: Wallyman

    Quote by: maxx

    300 grains of lead is a lot of lead to be pushing out of a gun, that is also a big chunk for a deer.

    If they make one that you can shoot lighter then I would give that a shot, it is going to make a fine bullet to kill a deer but it may be easier on your shoulder.

    I disagree. 300 grains in a 45/70 is a light bullet. My 45acp handgun shoots 230 gr FMJs. The original bullet was 400 or 405 grains, for the 45/70. Also, my 12 gauge slug gun shot 1 ounce slugs, which are a lot more then 300 grains (1 oz=437.5 gr.) I am saving up brass now, but when I reload for my Guide Gun, I am sitting a 300 grain projectile on top of a stiff dose of 3031. My 2 cents. Probably heavier for elk and bear, liking the looks of the 350 grain Swift A Frames.

    Ya coming from that perspective but I can promise you if you shoot a 250 grain bullet out of that thing and you hit a deer in the goodies it isn’t going far. I have watched 6 plus deer fall to 250 Grain Hornady XTP and 50 grains of triple 7 powder out of my muzzle loader with my kids shooting.

    In rifle terms and shooting deer a 300 grain bullet is huge. My 300 win mag which has a way more energy than the 45/70 is shooting a 180 grain bullet.

    AvatarWallyman
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    Post count: 887

    Quote by: maxx

    Quote by: Wallyman

    Quote by: maxx

    300 grains of lead is a lot of lead to be pushing out of a gun, that is also a big chunk for a deer.

    If they make one that you can shoot lighter then I would give that a shot, it is going to make a fine bullet to kill a deer but it may be easier on your shoulder.

    I disagree. 300 grains in a 45/70 is a light bullet. My 45acp handgun shoots 230 gr FMJs. The original bullet was 400 or 405 grains, for the 45/70. Also, my 12 gauge slug gun shot 1 ounce slugs, which are a lot more then 300 grains (1 oz=437.5 gr.) I am saving up brass now, but when I reload for my Guide Gun, I am sitting a 300 grain projectile on top of a stiff dose of 3031. My 2 cents. Probably heavier for elk and bear, liking the looks of the 350 grain Swift A Frames.

    Ya coming from that perspective but I can promise you if you shoot a 250 grain bullet out of that thing and you hit a deer in the goodies it isn’t going far. I have watched 6 plus deer fall to 250 Grain Hornady XTP and 50 grains of triple 7 powder out of my muzzle loader with my kids shooting.

    In rifle terms and shooting deer a 300 grain bullet is huge. My 300 win mag which has a way more energy than the 45/70 is shooting a 180 grain bullet.

    I agree. Just seems like the 300 grainers worked well, and that was from field experience. TBH, I was using my 35 Remington this winter for the CWD hunt in Allamakee county and the 220 grain Hornady LeveRevolution ammo worked great! I couldn’t tell a nickles difference between the 35 Rem and the 45/70 as far as their abilities to tip over whitetail deer at reasonable distance. As far as that 300WM of yours, you bet a 180 grain pill going 3000fps will beat out any lever bullet as far as energy, but a half inch hole through an animal usually puts them down pretty good, even if it is only going 1900fps:)

    Avatarkenhump
    Participant
    Post count: 12770

    Quote by: Wallyman

    Quote by: maxx

    300 grains of lead is a lot of lead to be pushing out of a gun, that is also a big chunk for a deer.

    If they make one that you can shoot lighter then I would give that a shot, it is going to make a fine bullet to kill a deer but it may be easier on your shoulder.

    I disagree. 300 grains in a 45/70 is a light bullet. My 45acp handgun shoots 230 gr FMJs. The original bullet was 400 or 405 grains, for the 45/70. Also, my 12 gauge slug gun shot 1 ounce slugs, which are a lot more then 300 grains (1 oz=437.5 gr.) I am saving up brass now, but when I reload for my Guide Gun, I am sitting a 300 grain projectile on top of a stiff dose of 3031. My 2 cents. Probably heavier for elk and bear, liking the looks of the 350 grain Swift A Frames.

    My grandfather had an 1873 trapdoor carbine. Standard load was 405gr. 300 gr was consider a ‘sporting load.’ I shot a 500gr that knocked me on my ads. Personally I would look at 300gr. With modern powder, that’s a lot of power.

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